T Nation

Left Hip Sits Lower, Left Leg is Shorter

As stated in thread subject:

  1. my left hip sits lower than my right hip

  2. my left leg is a tad shorter than my right one - not anatomically, though

  3. my right shoulder sits higher than my left one, very noticeably so

  4. causes the biggest problem for me, since I had a few tears at my right sternoclavicular joint (SCJ). It seems the shoulder height difference causes the sternal head of my right clavicle to be spaced too far apart from my right sternum. In conjunction with the SCJ ligament tear (anterior and posterior capsules), my right SCJ can’t take too much force and has been the weakest link in my upper body for the past 2 years.

Since I’m pretty sure that 3. can’t be fixed before 1. has been taken care of: how would I go about correcting the hip height dysbalance?

Get yourself checked out to determine if the hip is lower, or if the pelvis is rotated/tilted back. And if the opposite shoulder is higher, or if it is merely forward. If the pelvis is tilted back on one side, then the spine can have rotation, causing forward shoulder on the opposite side. If it is truly the problem, this can be fixed. May take some time and effort. Again, IF it is really the problem.

FattyFat,

Your ‘imbalance’ in your hips or pelvis is not something to lose sleep over.

First, there is no reliable way to determine this. Second, the pelvis and sacroiliac joint are naturally asymmetrical. There is no correlation between symmetries and pain. Even if there were, see my reliability statement. Next, lets assume it did matter for a second, there is no way to change it. If you’ve studied conservative rehabilitation research (i.e. manual therapy; non-surgical interventions), manipulation of the joint does not change the joint alignment at all. Mr. Hayes suggest it can be fixed but he obviously ignored or is unaware of the piles of research and evidence that have supported my statements here. Chiropractors, physical therapists and osteopaths have wasted thousands of dollars on courses and scared thousands of people into thinking they are structurally abnormal. It keeps the business coming back.

Finally, anyone that has dissected the pelvis of a human (I have) would remind you the pelvis and sacroiliac joints are two of the most reinforced regions of the body. You would need an axe to get to the sacroiliac joint.

The only way to figure out if your leg length is off is to have it x-rayed. Any individual that measures it with tape or a hands on approach, again, does not understand or ignores research and science…

[quote]olifter1 wrote:
FattyFat,

Your ‘imbalance’ in your hips or pelvis is not something to lose sleep over.

First, there is no reliable way to determine this. Second, the pelvis and sacroiliac joint are naturally asymmetrical. There is no correlation between symmetries and pain. Even if there were, see my reliability statement. Next, lets assume it did matter for a second, there is no way to change it. If you’ve studied conservative rehabilitation research (i.e. manual therapy; non-surgical interventions), manipulation of the joint does not change the joint alignment at all. Mr. Hayes suggest it can be fixed but he obviously ignored or is unaware of the piles of research and evidence that have supported my statements here. Chiropractors, physical therapists and osteopaths have wasted thousands of dollars on courses and scared thousands of people into thinking they are structurally abnormal. It keeps the business coming back.

Finally, anyone that has dissected the pelvis of a human (I have) would remind you the pelvis and sacroiliac joints are two of the most reinforced regions of the body. You would need an axe to get to the sacroiliac joint.

The only way to figure out if your leg length is off is to have it x-rayed. Any individual that measures it with tape or a hands on approach, again, does not understand or ignores research and science…
[/quote]
olifter, I am not suggesting that symmetry can be magically induced by hands-on technique. Just mentioning that many folks have, by working at desks, driving, remote-controlling, have adapted to postural faults. Forward shoulders, flattened lumbar regions, and forward head indicate lifestyle changes. Couple that with not watching form while deadlifting, over-reliance on bench press. Sure, I have not read everything that is out there, and maybe I am somewhat missing your point, but in no way am I stating that this is the only solution. Ready to listen to all opinions, agreeing or disagreeing. Rational discourse encouraged. Peace.

Not to sidetrack Fattyfat’s issues here but I seem to have a similar situation. At least I believe I do. I noticed when I perform dip exercises and my hands are placed in equivalent positions on the parallel bars that my shoulders do not sit at the same height and my traps do not seem symmetrical. I shrugged it off as something I would just have to live with but I am always fearful that this asymmetry could be the result of a problem or lead to future problems. Should I be concerned with this. I would really appreciate your insight olylifter you seem very educated on the subject, I am assuming your a MD.

[quote]olifter1 wrote:

You would need an axe to get to the sacroiliac joint.

[/quote]

I got to them with a scalpel, lol

Agreed…if the leg length inequality is anatomical

Ooops, hadn’t noticed the replies, thanks, guys.

Turned out I could solve my problem by doing away my left arch support and elevating the right one with a few layers of paper. Seriously.

FattyFat,

I hope everyone else here reads your comment. All this ‘alignment/symmetry/imbalance’ crap is based on examination methods that can be determined as ‘positive’ with something so simple as an arch support; not to mention these issues have ever shown any relevant link to pain or injury…

Well, in my case, the arch support made a tremendous difference concerning pain and functionality. :slight_smile:

What you perceive as your left leg being ‘shorter’ and your left hip being lower could be caused by excessive anterior tilt of your pelvis on that side. Any abnormal deviation at your pelvis knocks your entire frame’s alignment off; it is transfered both up and down body’s muscular chain (much like what happens to a car’s frame in an acccident). The foundation of your frame is not your feet, but your pelvis–the center of your body.

Yes, an insert for your shoe can ‘mask’ the problem and provide temporary relief. A better long-term, permanent solution would be to consult with a professional trainer that would assess your posture and identify/confirm any alignment issues you have and provide corrective exercises to resolve them speedily. This would spare your body from enormous wear and tear, as well.

Happy Training!

[quote]postureperfect wrote:
What you perceive as your left leg being ‘shorter’ and your left hip being lower could be caused by excessive anterior tilt of your pelvis on that side. Any abnormal deviation at your pelvis knocks your entire frame’s alignment off; it is transfered both up and down body’s muscular chain (much like what happens to a car’s frame in an acccident). The foundation of your frame is not your feet, but your pelvis–the center of your body.

Yes, an insert for your shoe can ‘mask’ the problem and provide temporary relief. A better long-term, permanent solution would be to consult with a professional trainer that would assess your posture and identify/confirm any alignment issues you have and provide corrective exercises to resolve them speedily. This would spare your body from enormous wear and tear, as well.

Happy Training! [/quote]

Just wondering what constitutes a “professional trainer”?

NASM CES certified. These trainers often work with NBA athletes, etc.
Or you could ask around your local gyms. Just make sure they specialize
in corrective training.(Someone who earns a living from it

[quote]postureperfect wrote:
NASM CES certified. These trainers often work with NBA athletes, etc.
Or you could ask around your local gyms. Just make sure they specialize
in corrective training.(Someone who earns a living from it [/quote]

Haha I just looked up the NASM training course and apparently you can become a CES certified trainer by doing an online multichoice course, what a joke.
These training courses NASM or what other course you choose to do are shit. Anyone with half a brain cell can pass them. The things that i hear coming out of the mouths of the trainers at the gym are terrible and to be honest the majority of their clients would be better off training themselves. I do get the fact that some clients need someone to hold their hands and tell them that they are doing the best exercises for them. However the exercises they do and the advise give is more likely to injure them than cure them (and pay a rediculous amount of money for the pleasure). I would hate to see anyone with any sort of pathology being trained by them, it would be suicide…

I also refute the claim that it is best to train with someone making a living from it. Some of the best coaches are the ones without any qualifications (although i would fail to call a personal training qualification a qualification anyways…) most of them have what is called a passion for the sport. Most won’t even accept a payment for their services.
They study training scheduals/methods… every night because they love what they are doing, not thinking of ways how they can make money of unsuspecting clients with the latest piece of shit equipment or drag up an old training schedual from the 80’s simply because no one else is doing it and they’ll look smart and innovative.
Also they have an interest beyond money and if you muck around, they don’t have time for that and will tell you to piss off.

My rant for the day!