T Nation

Lean Mass Friendly?

Hello, I am new to this site, and I had a question. I went to the doctor the other day to get my BF tested. They used a scale that sent an electrical current through my body and measured my body fat. I had a 22% body fat at 214 lbs giving me lean body mass 167lbs at 5’8.5".

I am currently following a powerlifting program where I am trying to get my 3 lifts up. I would also like to get my lean mass up well over 200lbs. Here’s the question: Will I build mass just as fast lifting heavy weights, or will I need to switch up my program to a more bodybuilding friendly program to get my lean body mass up?

[quote]SamiAmm wrote:
Hello, I am new to this site, and I had a question. I went to the doctor the other day to get my BF tested. They used a scale that sent an electrical current through my body and measured my body fat. I had a 22% body fat at 214 lbs giving me lean body mass 167lbs at 5’8.5".

I am currently following a powerlifting program where I am trying to get my 3 lifts up. I would also like to get my lean mass up well over 200lbs. Here’s the question: Will I build mass just as fast lifting heavy weights, or will I need to switch up my program to a more bodybuilding friendly program to get my lean body mass up? [/quote]

  1. Bodybuilders lift heavy weights.

  2. Whoever made it seem that bodybuilders don’t train heavy at all should be someone you avoid taking advice from in the future.

  3. The largest difference between bodybuilding and powerlifting is how they EAT and the fact that bodybuilders aren’t concerned with what their “one rep max” is.

  4. The goal in bodybuilding is not to simply get the weight up into the air but to fatigue the targeted muscle group if not bring it close to failure.

Like professor X says, just lift heavy and eat clean.

So I will build mass just as fast working in the low rep ranges than if I were to work in the say 8-12 rep range where you fatigue your muscles more?

[quote]Professor X wrote:

  1. Bodybuilders lift heavy weights.

  2. Whoever made it seem that bodybuilders don’t train heavy at all should be someone you avoid taking advice from in the future.

  3. The largest difference between bodybuilding and powerlifting is how they EAT and the fact that bodybuilders aren’t concerned with what their “one rep max” is.

  4. The goal in bodybuilding is not to simply get the weight up into the air but to fatigue the targeted muscle group if not bring it close to failure.[/quote]

[quote]SamiAmm wrote:
So I will build mass just as fast working in the low rep ranges than if I were to work in the say 8-12 rep range where you fatigue your muscles more?
[/quote]

Mix it up.

There is no set “rule” as to what people respond to best - everyone is different.

Try doing 6repsx4sets, then finish by doing 2sets of 12 reps - to get the blood flowing.

Bottom line is if you lifting heavy - tearing up the muscle and recovering by eating and sleeping a lot then you will grow.