T Nation

Layne's Take on Glassman


-Greg Glassman, founder of Crossfit Training.

S

Wow, lol. I’ll say one thing, crossfit “athletes” have been giving me a steady flow of patients as a Physical Therapist. The best part is when I try and tell them that I will undoubtedly see them again if they don’t change their programming and crazy antics, they just say “nah man, balls to the walls all day long.” SMH!

[quote]DaBeard wrote:
Wow, lol. I’ll say one thing, crossfit “athletes” have been giving me a steady flow of patients as a Physical Therapist. The best part is when I try and tell them that I will undoubtedly see them again if they don’t change their programming and crazy antics, they just say “nah man, balls to the walls all day long.” SMH![/quote]

I’ve heard that from another physical therapist and two chiropractors. Some coaches weigh in here: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_investigative/the_truth_about_crossfit

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:

[quote]DaBeard wrote:
Wow, lol. I’ll say one thing, crossfit “athletes” have been giving me a steady flow of patients as a Physical Therapist. The best part is when I try and tell them that I will undoubtedly see them again if they don’t change their programming and crazy antics, they just say “nah man, balls to the walls all day long.” SMH![/quote]

I’ve heard that from another physical therapist and two chiropractors. Some coaches weigh in here: http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_investigative/the_truth_about_crossfit[/quote]
[/quote]
At the PT company my brother’s a partner in (they handle training and rehab for a staggering amount of east coast professional athletes), one of the employees brought up integrating some Crossfit in their offerings, as it’s the latest thing. It was met with a definitive no f-ing way. It seems to be regarded by most professionals I speak with (at least in terms of the majority of Crossfit studios popping up every block or two) as unsafe in regard to the actual technique and practice of selected exercises.

S

The problem is mainly the high-rep explosive or Olympic lifting work for endurance. Exercise pairings too are often not well thought out. Much depends on the coach in charge though. Many box owners are smarter than whoever comes with the WODs at HQ.

It’s that damned kipping, isn’t it?

And another blow to the crossfit community lol

That’s funny because several years ago I bought the Crossfit Journal that supposedly defined what “Crossfit” was supposed to be and how it related to Glassman’s own view of fitness and health (I don’t regret the purchase because I was curious and I believe in gathering information before I make an opinion). So, isn’t Crossfit simply based on Glassman’s own “theory of fitness?” Does that make him a fraud as well?

Well I’d enjoy Glassman’s money.

I took his underlying sentiment to mean “do what works for you,” which has its place (everyone’s body is different). This viewpoint has certainly been bandied about here on this website, too. But, he does go a bit too far IMO by refusing to aknowledge any scientific basis whatsoever in any training method. Just my 2 cents.

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
The problem is mainly the high-rep explosive or Olympic lifting work for endurance. Exercise pairings too are often not well thought out. Much depends on the coach in charge though. Many box owners are smarter than whoever comes with the WODs at HQ. [/quote]

Your 100% correct. Walking overhead squats for distance are not what I would consider having a good safety vs. cost effectiveness ratio. The irony is that many of the ones I’ve treated think that their form is actually better than most other athletes. They’ll squat so low that the posterior pelvic tilt at the bottom is destroying posterior ligaments. I just really don’t like that it’s become a culture type of thing. The whole crossfit thing could have had some merit if done a little differently.

did anyone catch the Norton vs. Yates on twitter? now THAT was funny shit

A common negative theme about crossfit is the injuries, overuse,lack of form etc, but there must be lots of injuries and such at hardcore powerlifting gyms,hardcore bodybuilding gyms and other fitness facilities. It appears on forums and other places where people vent, that injuries only happen at crossfit gym and everyplace else it’s safe and their form and programmming are great. My two cents

What’s really sad to me is the fact that it’s by far the best mainstream fitness program we have right now.

While it’s flawed in a lot of ways, Crossfit is the only thing I see bringing “real” fitness - gyms with bars and chalk, proper long term nutrition, and squatting and other real exercises - to the masses. So on one hand I definitely applaud Crossfit for being light years ahead of the Zumba and yo-yo diet routines my friends have me critique, but I also find it nuts odd that the founder and designer is obese and doesn’t espouse the org’s values.

[quote]austin_bicep wrote:
Well I’d enjoy Glassman’s money.[/quote]
Okay, but you get his physique too. Enjoy. :wink:

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
It seems to be regarded by most professionals I speak with (at least in terms of the majority of Crossfit studios popping up every block or two) as unsafe in regard to the actual technique and practice of selected exercises. [/quote]
The worst/saddest/scariest part is that it’s intentional on the part of the coaches. Bryan Krahn’s piece about attending a Crossfit seminar really highlighted this, mostly in the “Sloppy Seconds” section.

A lady my girlfriend works with recently told her that she started going to a Crossfit gym, so my gal was asking me about it. I told her that I’ve thought about it for her before, but I haven’t found a single local place that I’d be comfortable letting her train at when I wasn’t there to keep an eye on things. She has knee and sporadic low back issues, and I’ll be damned if I send her to a Crossfit box just to do some generic group class routine.

[quote]browndisaster wrote:
What’s really sad to me is the fact that it’s by far the best mainstream fitness program we have right now.

While it’s flawed in a lot of ways, Crossfit is the only thing I see bringing “real” fitness - gyms with bars and chalk, proper long term nutrition, and squatting and other real exercises - to the masses. So on one hand I definitely applaud Crossfit for being light years ahead of the Zumba and yo-yo diet routines my friends have me critique, but I also find it nuts odd that the founder and designer is obese and doesn’t espouse the org’s values.[/quote]

I disagree with most of this. bars and chalk don’t inherently equate to a quality fitness program, to any degree. Those are just tools that can easily be misused, and in most crossfit gyms they are. I’m also not completely on board with their nutrition protocol (is it still paleo?) It’s better than an average american diet, but just about any thoughtful diet is.

Finally, I don’t believe crossfit is light years ahead of Zumba. Nobody’s ending up at the physical therapist with serious injuries as a result of shaking their ass too hard. In other words, I would rather send my girlfriend to a Zumba class than a Crossfit class any day of the week.

[quote]DaBeard wrote:

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
The problem is mainly the high-rep explosive or Olympic lifting work for endurance. Exercise pairings too are often not well thought out. Much depends on the coach in charge though. Many box owners are smarter than whoever comes with the WODs at HQ. [/quote]

Your 100% correct. Walking overhead squats for distance are not what I would consider having a good safety vs. cost effectiveness ratio. The irony is that many of the ones I’ve treated think that their form is actually better than most other athletes. They’ll squat so low that the posterior pelvic tilt at the bottom is destroying posterior ligaments. I just really don’t like that it’s become a culture type of thing. The whole crossfit thing could have had some merit if done a little differently.[/quote]

A lot of that blame goes on the coaches and owners of the individual CFit gyms. Your typical ‘need to get in shape’ person isn’t going to have knowledge of pelvic tilt and ankle flexion and how it should limit their squat depth even if they can physically get ‘deep.’ It’s the coach/trainers job to watch their athletes and inform them.

While this obviously happens in any gym, they aren’t being monitored by people running a progam(excepting pro training facility type gyms like DeFranco’s). Add in the idea that Crossfit espouses how they are so much better in terms of ‘fitness’ and health of their athletes, it puts more focus on them when they fail to address such issues.

Has anyone ever met someone who wasnt a former athelete or formely trained like a bodybuilder who does cross fit and looks good?

I have alot of former wrestling buddies on FB that always post crap about CF, but they were physically like that in the past. I have even more average Joe’s posting on it and they look like shit, just skinny hipsters.

A bit off topic, but the last argument i got into with a Cross Fit enthusiast ended when i asked him to take off his shirt and flex his ‘stabilizer’ muscles.

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]browndisaster wrote:
What’s really sad to me is the fact that it’s by far the best mainstream fitness program we have right now.

While it’s flawed in a lot of ways, Crossfit is the only thing I see bringing “real” fitness - gyms with bars and chalk, proper long term nutrition, and squatting and other real exercises - to the masses. So on one hand I definitely applaud Crossfit for being light years ahead of the Zumba and yo-yo diet routines my friends have me critique, but I also find it nuts odd that the founder and designer is obese and doesn’t espouse the org’s values.[/quote]

I disagree with most of this. bars and chalk don’t inherently equate to a quality fitness program, to any degree. Those are just tools that can easily be misused, and in most crossfit gyms they are. I’m also not completely on board with their nutrition protocol (is it still paleo?) It’s better than an average american diet, but just about any thoughtful diet is.

Finally, I don’t believe crossfit is light years ahead of Zumba. Nobody’s ending up at the physical therapist with serious injuries as a result of shaking their ass too hard. In other words, I would rather send my girlfriend to a Zumba class than a Crossfit class any day of the week.[/quote]
To me I see progress towards real lifting/nutrition on a large scale as a really good thing, even if it’s far from perfect. I definitely see your point and to be honest I don’t have authority on this subject, so I’ll leave it at that.

CrossFit has convinced many women to lift weights and not be scared of “getting too big.” And for that, I thank them.