T Nation

Lawyer or Whore?


#1

Decisions, decisions...

Of course, what she was having done to her literally is what most big-firm junior associates have done to them metaphorically.


#2

"Lawyer or Whore?"

Is there really a distinction?


#3

Of course there is. Whores have some morals! :wink:


#4

Always lawyer bashing until you need one yourself...very interesting!!


#5

As an upstanding citizen, not to mention a good guy, I don't have much need for a lawyer's services very regularly. And when I do, I sure as hell know they will do what they are getting paid for, and nothing more (generally speaking). This country is being litigated into the ground. As a recent transplant to CA, I am horrified by some of the crap I read in the papers. Example: a homeowner being found liable in the drowning of a child (in the homeowners' pool), despite the fact that they were away on vacation and the children were using the pool without their knowledge or permission. If it wasn't a lawyer that suggested suing, then it is certainly enabled by this pervasive eagarness to sue.


#6

I think it's sad that so many are obsessed with (what I believe is) the social status of such professions; so much so that they will sell their souls (or bodies, in this case) to achieve it. I may not have a Stanford Law degree, but at least I can be proud of what I see in the mirror each morning.


#7

a. I've never had sex worth $650/hour

b. I'll bet Boston Barrister doesn't charge that much.

c. I'm glad prostitution is illegal, because if it weren't I'd be really tempted to pay the $650 to see if it was worth it.


#8

Ah, lawyer jokes can be funny. I'm definitely not a fan of the plaintiff's bar myself.

Dookie -- I don't think anyone was obsessed with status in this story, unless it's the status that accompanies money. Whores don't get high social standing, generally...

Doogie: They charge clients $250/hour for my services... But I'm just an associate, so I'm on a salary.


#9

I suppose it is the status that accompanies the money; I just find it hard to believe that she was so driven to become a lawyer because she had a burning desire to help people.


#10

I'm sorry to hear you have yet to have sex worth $650 and hour. To be honest I don't think the price is that bad because you can ask a hooker to do things that most girls won't.


#11

The one I heard was "What's the difference between a lawyer and a whore? A whore stops screwing you after you're dead."


#12

why doesn't everyone just admit that they'd love to get paid 650 bucks an hour to have sex


#13

Common misconception. I am fairly sure I actually read somewhere that overall, litigation is DOWN. Its just that the media reports about it a lot more now, so it SEEMS like its up. And for the pool case, well, think if it were your kid. Kids do that kind of crap - that's why pools should have fences with locked gates around them. If this pool was just sitting there in the back yard, and any of the local kids could go sneak in whenever, then the people had what was coming to them... TONS of kids die in pools, and its a simple matter to fence the damn thing off.


#14

Oh and just to add.. that is one nice set of tits.


#15

Sniper99

I was wondering how you would define having the pool fenced off. I would imagine that the pool was probably in a back yard which was more than likely fenced already. Since the owners were away on holidays we could probably assume that ther yard was secured as well. If this was the case, what difference would a fence around the pool make? The kids already got into the yard, why would another fence stop them?

As far as I am concerned, operating on the assumption that the yard was secured, the kids had no right to be there in the first place. So how could the owners be blamed?


#16

Onion:

It's the so-called "attractive nuisance" theory in torts, and it really only applies to kids. We studied a bunch of these cases in "Legal Process" class in law school -- the theory started out applicable to railroad turntables, and is applicable to such things as mountains of sand on construction sites, and, unfortunately, swimming pools.

In most cases, landowners do not have to protect other people trespassing on their property from clear hazards. However, in the case of children, in many states there is a duty to protect from "attractive nuisances," which are basically anything that the owner could reasonably suspect would attract kids.

The strength of the duty depends upon the caselaw in the state -- apparently, CA is rather stringent. One would think that a fence, with a locked gate, would be sufficient, but maybe some case out in CA said it's not.


#17

This was always my favorite:

Q. Why do lawyers know so many lawyer jokes?

A. Because they're all true.

I've always had an interest in pursuing a law degree, but I just rebel at the idea of being yet ANOTHER Jewish lawyer. Jewish software developers are at least a bit less common.


#18

What do you call the person who scores lowest in their class on the bar exam?

"Your Honor"


#19

I know this is a serious discussion and all, but AMEN to that.


#20

I third that opinion.