T Nation

Lat Recruitment

With any lat movement I do, on my left side my rear delt seem to take more of the brunt of the load than the lat. I don’t have this problem on the right side.

Any techniques to increase lat involvement over rear delt involvement?

Do a straight arm lat pulldown to pre-fatigue the lats. Try doing these with no waiting prior to the lat work.

Straight arm lat pulldown: stand in front of a cable machine. Grab the bar with you arms slightly bent. Move the bar in a downward arc till it touches your leg. Slowly reverse the motion and repeat.

If you are doing lat pulldowns behind the neck, then you are also using posterior deltoid muscles. Doing lat pulldowns infront of the neck recruits the lats more.

Thanks, but I’m saying any lat exercise mainly hits my delt on the left side. Especially pull-overs and straight-armed pull downs don’t seem to do anything for the left lat. Moderate grip pullups have seemed to be my best bet. I’m wondering if it has something to do with the shoulder rotators, scapula retraction, or trap balance or something like that.

Sometimes it feels like there’s a little hitch in my left shoulder at a certain point on the way up. It’s like I need to keep my left shoulder up a little higher to get past this point(as if I were shrugging). I’ve also noticed my left shoulder is slightly higher than the right at rest.

[quote]darrenrs wrote:
Thanks, but I’m saying any lat exercise mainly hits my delt on the left side. Especially pull-overs and straight-armed pull downs don’t seem to do anything for the left lat. Moderate grip pullups have seemed to be my best bet. I’m wondering if it has something to do with the shoulder rotators, scapula retraction, or trap balance or something like that.

Sometimes it feels like there’s a little hitch in my left shoulder at a certain point on the way up. It’s like I need to keep my left shoulder up a little higher to get past this point(as if I were shrugging). I’ve also noticed my left shoulder is slightly higher than the right at rest.[/quote]

Check out the “Neanderthal No More” series; Mike and I outline some stretches for your levator scapulae and upper traps. Do them for the left side only, and incorporate some single-arm prone trap raises, cable rows, and scapular wall slides on the left side.

Thanks Eric, I think thats just what I needed.