T Nation

Laser Dentistry

Anyone familiar with this?

Is it better, less painfull?

http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/laser/

yeah i read that, thats all i can find,. wondering if anyone had first hand experience as a patient, or as an actual dentist

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
Anyone familiar with this?

Is it better, less painfull?[/quote]

It is only less “painful” (and by this I assume you mean needing anesthetic because getting a tooth worked on in itself should not be “painful” unless you aren’t numb) if you have very sensitive teeth and your cavities are very shallow and would likely not need much anesthetic in the first place. In other words, if you are a regular dental patient with great hygiene and you only have a few small cavities that just appeared in the last year or so, yeah, this may be able to get the job without anesthetic IF the cavity is very small.

If you have not been to a dentist regularly and have HUGE cavities that are near root canals, no, you will have to be numbed no matter what.

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
Anyone familiar with this?

Is it better, less painfull?[/quote]

It is only less “painful” (and by this I assume you mean needing anesthetic because getting a tooth worked on in itself should not be “painful” unless you aren’t numb) if you have very sensitive teeth and your cavities are very shallow and would likely not need much anesthetic in the first place. In other words, if you are a regular dental patient with great hygiene and you only have a few small cavities that just appeared in the last year or so, yeah, this may be able to get the job without anesthetic IF the cavity is very small.

If you have not been to a dentist regularly and have HUGE cavities that are near root canals, no, you will have to be numbed no matter what.

[/quote]

Got it, thanks, any reason why i should or shouldn’t go to one? or is it basically the same thing done differently.

I have lived in several countries and several cities over the past many years and as such the last time i went to a dentist i think they hit you on the head with a rock as a pain killer.

[quote]stevo_ wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
Anyone familiar with this?

Is it better, less painfull?[/quote]

It is only less “painful” (and by this I assume you mean needing anesthetic because getting a tooth worked on in itself should not be “painful” unless you aren’t numb) if you have very sensitive teeth and your cavities are very shallow and would likely not need much anesthetic in the first place. In other words, if you are a regular dental patient with great hygiene and you only have a few small cavities that just appeared in the last year or so, yeah, this may be able to get the job without anesthetic IF the cavity is very small.

If you have not been to a dentist regularly and have HUGE cavities that are near root canals, no, you will have to be numbed no matter what.

[/quote]

Got it, thanks, any reason why i should or shouldn’t go to one? or is it basically the same thing done differently.

I have lived in several countries and several cities over the past many years and as such the last time i went to a dentist i think they hit you on the head with a rock as a pain killer.[/quote]

I treat patients all day long and they leave happy. If you haven’t seen a dentist in years, focus more on finding a good dentist rather than worrying about whether they use lasers.

That technology has been around for a while. I first heard of it while still in school, but the cost of it is why I imagine it hasn’t caught on in a more substantial way.

PX-

This was in the news a few weeks ago. Have you heard much about this and how far away (timewise) it is? Seems pretty neat.

Acid syringe ‘could spell an end to dentist’s drill’

It’s the main reason so many of us feel such trepidation when faced with a trip to the dentist.

But the dreaded drill could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a new technique in which teeth are treated with acid gel squirted from a syringe.

Although acid in food and drink is one of the biggest causes of decay, scientists say its corrosive properties become an advantage when it comes to removing rotting parts of teeth.

And while a drill can destroy healthy parts of the tooth, the makers of the pencil-sized ‘Icon’ syringe say their treatment is far more efficient at removing only the diseased area - and less traumatic.

Full Story:

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]stevo_ wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
Anyone familiar with this?

Is it better, less painfull?[/quote]

It is only less “painful” (and by this I assume you mean needing anesthetic because getting a tooth worked on in itself should not be “painful” unless you aren’t numb) if you have very sensitive teeth and your cavities are very shallow and would likely not need much anesthetic in the first place. In other words, if you are a regular dental patient with great hygiene and you only have a few small cavities that just appeared in the last year or so, yeah, this may be able to get the job without anesthetic IF the cavity is very small.

If you have not been to a dentist regularly and have HUGE cavities that are near root canals, no, you will have to be numbed no matter what.

[/quote]

Got it, thanks, any reason why i should or shouldn’t go to one? or is it basically the same thing done differently.

I have lived in several countries and several cities over the past many years and as such the last time i went to a dentist i think they hit you on the head with a rock as a pain killer.[/quote]

I treat patients all day long and they leave happy. If you haven’t seen a dentist in years, focus more on finding a good dentist rather than worrying about whether they use lasers.

That technology has been around for a while. I first heard of it while still in school, but the cost of it is why I imagine it hasn’t caught on in a more substantial way.

[/quote]

Fair play mate. Thank you.

[quote]SteelyD wrote:
PX-

This was in the news a few weeks ago. Have you heard much about this and how far away (timewise) it is? Seems pretty neat.

Acid syringe ‘could spell an end to dentist’s drill’

It’s the main reason so many of us feel such trepidation when faced with a trip to the dentist.

But the dreaded drill could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a new technique in which teeth are treated with acid gel squirted from a syringe.

Although acid in food and drink is one of the biggest causes of decay, scientists say its corrosive properties become an advantage when it comes to removing rotting parts of teeth.

And while a drill can destroy healthy parts of the tooth, the makers of the pencil-sized ‘Icon’ syringe say their treatment is far more efficient at removing only the diseased area - and less traumatic.

Full Story:


[/quote]

Only cavity I have ever had was so minor that they oxide blased it out with Al2O3 alumina powder and filled it with the UV reactive epoxy. Took less then 10 minutes for the whole thing…

Oh, he ground down the epoxy after it hardened with a drill type grinding ball to smooth it out till ti felt right…

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I treat patients all day long and they leave happy.
[/quote]

I think they are happy this huge guy is not going to eat them for dinner and they let alive. That is why they are happy! :wink:

I am sorry but I see a huge guy that is massive with a dentist drill. I think I would be a little afraid to be honest. Specially if I was a little kid.

[quote]dirtbag wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I treat patients all day long and they leave happy.
[/quote]

I think they are happy this huge guy is not going to eat them for dinner and they let alive. That is why they are happy! :wink:

I am sorry but I see a huge guy that is massive with a dentist drill. I think I would be a little afraid to be honest. Specially if I was a little kid.[/quote]

I’ve been treating only kids all day and they seem quite happy.

In fact, I’ve found kids to be far less prejudice based on appearance than adults. My last patient (we are done for the day right now) was only 9 years old and was scared to come. She left smiling after three fillings.

The one thing I know how to do is get in people’s heads.

I’m good at what I do. If some of you allow your own biases to determine who treats you, that is your own set of problems.

The one thing I would never do is base who treats me on how they look.

My dentist keeps saying he wants to get a lazer when he is working on me. One of the problems I have is I’m a bleeder. A procedure that takes 30 minutes for a normal person takes 2 hours with me because my dentist is constantly trying to control my bleeding. He said if he had a lazer he could just zap my gums a little and cauderize them so they stop bleeding while he works.

V