T Nation

Lactic Acid Training

In his recent article CP describes 2
training regimes.

The first “Judo” regime involves 4 total body movements for sets of 12 with 1 minute rest between sets.

The second “bodybuilding” regime involves 3 sets of 6, 12 and 25 reps on
3 different exercises per body part with 10 seconds rest between sets.

As lactic acid tolerance is important for a number of sports including wrestling/grappling I wonder if utilising the second regime for sports
training, a rep range of say 10/10/10 or 5/10/15 might not be preferable?

I say this as intense efforts are more akin to the demand that one faces on the mat rather than the ability to sustain high numbers of reps of a relatively light movement.

I appreciate that the duration of the effort may be important to create max levels of lactic acid but does this apparent advantage (which obviously does not figure in the Judo regime)overcome the disadvantage of utilising light weights -at least for the last set?

Any thoughts?

[quote]peterm533 wrote:
In his recent article CP describes 2
training regimes.

The first “Judo” regime involves 4 total body movements for sets of 12 with 1 minute rest between sets.

The second “bodybuilding” regime involves 3 sets of 6, 12 and 25 reps on
3 different exercises per body part with 10 seconds rest between sets.

As lactic acid tolerance is important for a number of sports including wrestling/grappling I wonder if utilising the second regime for sports
training, a rep range of say 10/10/10 or 5/10/15 might not be preferable?

I say this as intense efforts are more akin to the demand that one faces on the mat rather than the ability to sustain high numbers of reps of a relatively light movement.

I appreciate that the duration of the effort may be important to create max levels of lactic acid but does this apparent advantage (which obviously does not figure in the Judo regime)overcome the disadvantage of utilising light weights -at least for the last set?

Any thoughts?

[/quote]

From what I noticed from watching the Olympics, Judo requires just enough stamina to hold onto your opponent long enought for you to explosively throw him/her. With that being said, one needs to look at the energy system demand and muscle adaptation requirements of the sport- explosive strength. L

actic acid training is an ideal training tool for mixed martial arts, wrestling, and boxing because of the constant moving of hitting, kicking, avoiding blows, position manuevering during a 3-5 minute time period. With Judo, a majority of energy is spent holding onto your opponet long enough to execute a quick throw. There is no running aroung the mat avoiding punches or kicks or throwing 20-40 blows a round.

Lactic acid training has a place in any training program. It all depends on where you place it in your periodization scheme and how often you think you will need to use this tool.

[quote]Truet wrote:
peterm533 wrote:
In his recent article CP describes 2
training regimes.

The first “Judo” regime involves 4 total body movements for sets of 12 with 1 minute rest between sets.

The second “bodybuilding” regime involves 3 sets of 6, 12 and 25 reps on
3 different exercises per body part with 10 seconds rest between sets.

As lactic acid tolerance is important for a number of sports including wrestling/grappling I wonder if utilising the second regime for sports
training, a rep range of say 10/10/10 or 5/10/15 might not be preferable?

I say this as intense efforts are more akin to the demand that one faces on the mat rather than the ability to sustain high numbers of reps of a relatively light movement.

I appreciate that the duration of the effort may be important to create max levels of lactic acid but does this apparent advantage (which obviously does not figure in the Judo regime)overcome the disadvantage of utilising light weights -at least for the last set?

Any thoughts?

From what I noticed from watching the Olympics, Judo requires just enough stamina to hold onto your opponent long enought for you to explosively throw him/her. With that being said, one needs to look at the energy system demand and muscle adaptation requirements of the sport- explosive strength. L

actic acid training is an ideal training tool for mixed martial arts, wrestling, and boxing because of the constant moving of hitting, kicking, avoiding blows, position manuevering during a 3-5 minute time period. With Judo, a majority of energy is spent holding onto your opponet long enough to execute a quick throw. There is no running aroung the mat avoiding punches or kicks or throwing 20-40 blows a round.

Lactic acid training has a place in any training program. It all depends on where you place it in your periodization scheme and how often you think you will need to use this tool.

[/quote]

Have you ever grappled? A high level grappling match looks very simple and still but they are constantly exerting force against each other and trying to move each other. They just don’t succeed most of the time because they are both so good.

Actually judo randori can be every bit as tiring as any other combat sport. You aren’t just standing there holding onto your opponent. Both parties are moving and constantly trying to control grip and position. Lactic acid training is a good idea for sure for Judo and I personally would strive for that 12 rep workout without rest periods.