T Nation

Lacrosse Training

Grandson just got his acceptance letter to college where he hopes to play lacrosse. He’s about 6’1" and 185, got some quicks and hops. Four-year letterman and two-year captain. College lacrosse I’ve seen on the tube looks pretty physical. I’d like to help him get prepared. He’s been pounding on a tire with a 12-pound sledge and flipping it and dragging it around.

He does some lifting and sprinting. He’s a mid-fielder, so he handles the ball a lot and is the target for all the defenders. Does anyone know about a “Be a Lacrosse Superman” box or DVD or somebody who specializes in training lacrosse players? Does he just do a football workout with some extra arm and shoulder work for shooting?

Thanks.

Hey buddy,

Ill get you in touch with JTownLax. He is a lacrosse player. he does have a training log, but only logs in the off-season as he just maintains and trains with the team in-season.

Im sure he can give your grandson some advice.

Uncle Bird.

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I’m a lax coach and player. The non-traditional stuff (tires, sledge, ropes, ect) are a hot topic in the lacrosse world today; they carry over to the game well and espouse general athleticism. They’re a decent start. Whole-body workouts focusing on basic movements are always good, maybe giving a little extra attention to the overhead press.

As a middie, he should try to do a little extra conditioning, and extra work on the upper back, shoulders, and wrists/forearms will serve him well. Don’t focus on weight too much and rather on explosiveness and flexibility/mobility. Skill work with some moderate-length distance work (4&8 hundred meter timed runs) should be decent.

Lacrosse players aren’t usually given benchmarks for weightroom performance like a football player would be. Don’t get too hung up on numbers. If he can run a sub-50 second 400m and an 800 in 1:40 or so he shouldn’t have to worry about fitness too much. A good model in terms of strength and ability to try to emulate would me Max Siebald; your grandson will know who he is.

Any other questions, feel free to ask.

Hi Jeffco,

High school season just starting here in Ohio. Son and grandson were down today for son’s birthday/ I told them about your reply. Coincidentally, my son said he was timing his son at 400 meters and aiming at 60. I told him you mentioned 50. I used to run some track so I suggested they do some intervals with 600s and 800s and bust some 50s and 100s so he has a combination of speed and stamina. Oddly enough, the boy has talked to Max Siebold a couple of times at camps. There was a good article in T-Nation last week on shoulders. I told my son to read it and then have the boy do a sort of scaled-down program in-season and then crank up both his speed and stamina work in the summer along with strength stuff. I’ll let you know when he hits a 50 sec. 400. Thanks for the assist.

old geezer

[quote]Jeffro_88 wrote:
I’m a lax coach and player. The non-traditional stuff (tires, sledge, ropes, ect) are a hot topic in the lacrosse world today; they carry over to the game well and espouse general athleticism. They’re a decent start. Whole-body workouts focusing on basic movements are always good, maybe giving a little extra attention to the overhead press.

As a middie, he should try to do a little extra conditioning, and extra work on the upper back, shoulders, and wrists/forearms will serve him well. Don’t focus on weight too much and rather on explosiveness and flexibility/mobility. Skill work with some moderate-length distance work (4&8 hundred meter timed runs) should be decent.

Lacrosse players aren’t usually given benchmarks for weightroom performance like a football player would be. Don’t get too hung up on numbers. If he can run a sub-50 second 400m and an 800 in 1:40 or so he shouldn’t have to worry about fitness too much. A good model in terms of strength and ability to try to emulate would me Max Siebald; your grandson will know who he is.

Any other questions, feel free to ask.[/quote]
A 1:40 800???

Seriously, though–if you take your kid out to the track and he runs a 1:40, immediately remove him from his lacrosse program and send him to the 2016 Rio olympics where he will earn a gold medal in the 800.

And a sub-50 400? get out of here. you’re a shitty coach

[quote]bigblockford wrote:

[quote]Jeffro_88 wrote:
I’m a lax coach and player. The non-traditional stuff (tires, sledge, ropes, ect) are a hot topic in the lacrosse world today; they carry over to the game well and espouse general athleticism. They’re a decent start. Whole-body workouts focusing on basic movements are always good, maybe giving a little extra attention to the overhead press.

As a middie, he should try to do a little extra conditioning, and extra work on the upper back, shoulders, and wrists/forearms will serve him well. Don’t focus on weight too much and rather on explosiveness and flexibility/mobility. Skill work with some moderate-length distance work (4&8 hundred meter timed runs) should be decent.

Lacrosse players aren’t usually given benchmarks for weightroom performance like a football player would be. Don’t get too hung up on numbers. If he can run a sub-50 second 400m and an 800 in 1:40 or so he shouldn’t have to worry about fitness too much. A good model in terms of strength and ability to try to emulate would me Max Siebald; your grandson will know who he is.

Any other questions, feel free to ask.[/quote]
A 1:40 800???

Seriously, though–if you take your kid out to the track and he runs a 1:40, immediately remove him from his lacrosse program and send him to the 2016 Rio olympics where he will earn a gold medal in the 800.

And a sub-50 400? get out of here. you’re a shitty coach[/quote]

Just looked this up and saw that the WORLD RECORD in the 800 is 1:40 and change. OP, don’t listen to anything this guy says. Look into WS4SB versions 1,2 &3. All three would work perfectly for your kid.

In all honest i know this is a lifting forum and all but i do not think that weightlifting should be your number one priority when training for lacrosse. For me it is but thats just because i enjoy is and dislike running.

As a lacrosse play in the midfield position i would focus on overall conditioning. Have your grandson do lots of 100 yard sprints and longer sprints such as a full field suicide. The goal is to never get tired as a middy because they control the teams possession in the midfield. I would also include some explosive work such as box jumps med ball slams etc. As for lifting get him on 5/3/1 or WS4SB3 of any program where he will continuously progress in strength on the squat, bench, deadlift, and press. Before each lifting session have him perform mobility drills such as " Agile ". So for example if he is in the offseason this is what i would do.

4 days a week :

-explosive training ( Box jumps, med ball slams, short sprints anywhere from 10-50 yards)
-mobility( Highly recommend Agile 8)
-lifting via 5/3/1 or any other sufficient program

  • conditioning ( prowler, full field suicides, Shuttle runs)

Off days he should focus on skill pick up games, wallball, footwork etc.

In conjunction with a good diet he should be in good shape for the season.

Wow, I was going to say something about the 1:40 goal in the 800 since the world record is just over 1:40.

First of all, where does he live and where is he going to college. If you let us know where he lives, I might be able to suggest someone. He should have a strength coach at the college he committed to, and he should have a program available. That’s probably the best place to start.

I train a lot of LAX players, and he’s going to need a combination of conditioning, speed and strength. He definitely needs to continue lifting. He doesn’t need to worry about numbers or powerlifting, but he’s going to need to lift, so keep him in the weight room.

For conditioning, he’s going to need a combination of short-sprint speed, long-sprint speed, agility and endurance, so he needs to do it all. I recommend putting together interval workouts that include different distances and speeds, mixed with changes of direction. You can turn it into a long obstacle course to keep it interesting.

Have him run with his stick all the time because that changes things dramatically. And, never ever forget that LAX is a game of SKILL so make sure he’s constantly working his skills.

Let us know where he is and where he’ll be going.