T Nation

Knife Defense


#1

Hi everyone,

I saw this video about a knife attack today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUm42U1hv8M&feature=youtu.be

It got me wondering about knife defense and such . . . I've only ever done combat sports, so I've never really delved into weapon defense. Anyone know any sports / traditional martial arts / instructors that actually teach realistic defense?

Obviously, awareness to avoid these situations and being a fast sprinter are probably better than any training . . .

Bonus topic of conversation: I couldn't help feeling ridiculously enraged by the video. I can't help but think that, in clear cases like this where it was truly unprovoked violence, the death penalty should almost required. Thoughts?


#2

“Obviously, awareness to avoid these situations and being a fast sprinter are probably better than any training”

^^^^^^^^^==TRUTH.

Some excellent reading:

IMHO: Try to locate and train with a quality RMA instructor. I am sure Sento will respond with a detailed answer to your question, he is a very experienced RMA instructor.

IMHO: Death penalty discussions are better suited for GAL. This forum focuses on the practical not the philosophical. I dont recall seeing you post here. Welcome.


#3

Sad story and as a father of a little son myself, my heart goes out to the family of Daniel.

I’d also like to state that, although I would have acted differently than a Daniel and his friend did and could point out several “mistakes/better courses of action” that they made/could have made which could have potentially saved Daniel’s life, neither of them is responsible for Daniel’s death; the men who commited this assault and murder are solely at fault.

Regarding Martial Arts/Martial Artists to seek out for edged weapon defense, Richard Ryan and his Martial Art of Dynamic Combat Method has the best edged weapon defense program and methodology of anyone out there. Walt Lysak and his Lysak’s Sento Method is also outstanding and their jointly founded iCAT Martial Arts provides the best of both worlds.

If you cannot get access to either of them or any of their instructors, then some other good resources include:
Tony Blauer
Kelly McCann
Dan Inosanto
Mike Lee Kanarek
to name a few who I know are legit but I’m sure there are others that I am unfamiliar with or have slipped my mind

Some Martial Arts that address edged weapon defense realistically include:
Dynamic Combat Method (DCM)
Lysak’s Sento Method (LSM)
Integrated Combative Arts Training (iCAT)
Chu Fen Do
Krav Maga
Haganah
Kali (or any Indonesian or Phillipino Art really as both cultures are historically “blade cultures”)
Most legit “Combatives” programs will also address edged weapons defense, but the quality can vary

Regarding awareness and sprinting…

Yes, awareness is always an important aspect of any self defense situation, and provided that it is safe, possible, and feasible running/escape is the best option when dealing with weapons, especially when unarmed. In this situation though, it was not safe, possible, and feasible for Daniel to just run and leave his friend to the mercy of these three men who had already demonstrated the ability, intent, and means to do him harm. In such situations where escape is not a viable option there are several other effective measures that one can take to maximize your chances of survival (none of which a Daniel really attempted/implemented), but the reality of edged weapons defense is that it is an extremely dangerous situation (compounded even more by the fact that he was also outnumbered) and there is no foolproof/gauranteed means to surviving such a situation. You are also very likely going to get cut and wind up in the hospital should you find yourself in such a situation, your goal is to survive, so mentally preparing yourself for this reality is also a crucial step in edged weapons (or any weapons for that matter) defense training.

Good luck.


#4

jgreever1167,

I second idaho’s post.

On the off chance you are posting from the UK than two names that are well regarded are Geoff Thompson and Lee Morrison.

In general edged weapon defense is going to be especially tricky. Weapons were invented for a reason so if you are stuck facing a weapon armed only with finger nails and harsh language you are already really behind the curve.

Edged weapons can be even uglier because a good blade or point can do damage without a lot of effort/energy. This means that even an off balanced flailing can open you up. That is not the case with clubs, fists, ect.

Add to the mix that a whole lot of folks don’t realize there is a blade involved until after. They may notice the attack seems “off”(e.g. a lurch instead of a punch). This means that having one set of tactics/technique for “fist fighting” and another for “edged defense” can really be fucked up.

I would also look at the situational awareness and bad idea threads for general self defense discussion.

Welcome to the forum.

Regards,

Robert A


#5

One night, out in the parking lot of a shitty club, my friends and I were enjoying a car bar pre-game. It began like any night that ends with a knifing in that we chose a shitty club to hang out in and were drinking. You don’t always need both these conditions but together they make most scenarios a perfect storm of stupid.

As we drank we saw a gang of teens get in a scuffle, heard the sound of broken glass and then watched the group scatter but for a few individuals. One looked really distressed and as he lifted his shirt it was clear he’d been cut with a broken bottle. The cuts didn’t seem more than superficial but our hero started to freak out and was going into shock. Him and his buddies piled into a car and sped off to a hospital that was mercifully less than two blocks away.

Nobody even saw the bottle coming. It started with a fist fight that I personally would have won hands down outnumbered by these scrubs. But it escalated when an otherwise innocuous bottle turned into an edged weapon. It also happened in 30 seconds. And suddenly it was a situation that I personally would have left bleeding, just like our hero.

As if that wasn’t enough, out of the shadows appeared the “Incredulous Hulk” as a I call him. An infamous local tow truck operator with a chip on his shoulder and a skull that pre-dates cro magnon man. Oh, he was wearing a pink shirt. Out of his pocket came a knife. I switchblade. As I understand it, switchblades are issued at birth to cunts. They’ve always got them.

He held the blade against his leg and basically threatened to cut us if we didn’t tell him who started the fight. My friends were tripping hard and just smiling through a booze and drug addled fog at this giant, pink shirted turd. I realised I was singled out as the most sober by him. This guy was easily twice my weight. I very quickly presented the most nonthreatening posture I could, showed the man-mountain my empty hands and straight up told him that he was in control of this situation and that I couldn’t help him. I also asked if he knew the group of teens. He didn’t. He pretty much just wanted to stab someone, even if it was me. I made it clear to him that I didn’t know them either, that the fight ended quickly and that everyone ran. I also told him where the hospital was but warned him that I knew there were police at that hospital all the time (I wanted to give him something, seem like I was helping but also make him think twice about actually going there). Slowly, I became an unappetizing meal for this guy. He was expecting a hamburger and I gave him tofu and rice. Almost annoyed that he wasn’t able to end a life, he stormed off.

This cluster fuck of a night left me with some very valuable lessons that I earned at little cost… luckily:

Fights break out around you. Don’t get involved.

You can inadvertently become embroiled in someone else’s fight. Get the fuck out of it rick fucken tick.

Anything sharp, that can be held is a weapon.

Try not to be drunk or high in unsafe areas.

This started as a scrap, and ended with a call to a hospital and immediately, another knife point encounter. Shit ESCALATES!

You need to be absolutely certain of victory before you engage an assailant that is armed. Even if you are armed yourself. If you cannot 100% guarantee this then you need to avoid the conflict at all costs.

Now, OP, I’m sorry I babbled like this. But my anecdote taught me in less than 15 minutes outside a shitty club in a shitty town something that people have been trying to learn from Martial Arts and Self Defence for centuries. The best way to avoid the scenario I experienced was to sit down with my mates and say, “Guys, 54 is a shite club. Every time we go there we see shit. Let’s go to a nice bar that doesn’t need a bouncer where the girls are classy and much hotter. We can get proper smashed and then catch a cab home.”

Nonetheless I advocate training. But common sense and awareness trump my physical ability to defend myself and has to this day saved me from situations I don’t even know I avoided. Here ends my sermon.

P.S: I have a funny story about our pink-shirted shaved gorilla receiving some instant Karma later that evening. It’s another anecdote about how being armed doesn’t necessarily mean automatic glory in battle.


#6

[quote]Pigeonkak wrote:

P.S: I have a funny story about our pink-shirted shaved gorilla receiving some instant Karma later that evening. It’s another anecdote about how being armed doesn’t necessarily mean automatic glory in battle.

[/quote]

You can’t just hang that out there and leave it like that brother.


#7

Good points pigeon, and glad you got out of that safe.

I would revise one thing you said though and that is that you should always seek to avoid an edged weapon attack if that option is available, even if you have a superior weapon. But, should you find yourself in a situation where it is you or them, you need to make up your mind that you will do anything and everything to prevail and that you will survive while they will not. There is no “fair”, “cheap”, “dirty” or any other “sporty” types of restrictions on your mind or actions; it is truly anything goes and a kill or be killed mentality.

I actually want to write more on this subject and expand on some of the points that you and Robert have brought up, because they are very important to understanding edged weapon defense situations, but will have to wait till I get more time.


#8

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
Good points pigeon, and glad you got out of that safe.

I would revise one thing you said though and that is that you should always seek to avoid an edged weapon attack if that option is available, even if you have a superior weapon. But, should you find yourself in a situation where it is you or them, you need to make up your mind that you will do anything and everything to prevail and that you will survive while they will not. There is no “fair”, “cheap”, “dirty” or any other “sporty” types of restrictions on your mind or actions; it is truly anything goes and a kill or be killed mentality.

I actually want to write more on this subject and expand on some of the points that you and Robert have brought up, because they are very important to understanding edged weapon defense situations, but will have to wait till I get more time.
[/quote]

I think we’d all learn a lot from that write up. I’m sure I speak for everyone when I say that I hope you are able to find time!


#9

Thanks for the kind words London. :slight_smile:

I keep starting this post but getting interrupted, so I’m going to break this into smaller posts.

Robert mentioned some good realities about the lethality of edged weapons that I wanted to flesh out.

First, anyone wielding an edged weapon against you should automatically be considered your superior and should be approached with the utmost respect and caution (I would also add that in a real encounter, you should assume that everyone is armed until you have evidence to the contrary, not the other way around). As Robert mentioned, weapons were created to exponentiate the killing abilities of human beings eons ago and although recent improvements in projectile weapons (guns, missles, and bombs) have caused them to replace edged weapons as the primary weapons of modern war, edged weapons held that title for centuries and for good reason.

The primary characteristic behind edged weapons’ lethality is due to their design. By creating a very small, elongated surface area (edge) edged weapons are able to focus energy into a very small area, thus magnifying that force considerably and consequently the damage. This means that with very little mass, speed, or leverage (the components generally required to create considerable force and/or damage) edged weapons are still capable of inflicting serious damage. We actually refer to them as “touch weapons” due to this characteristic, as the blade really only has to touch you in order to do damage. Add to this characteristic the fact that our skin is pressurized/under constant tension/is elastic and the effects of being cut with an edged weapon become even more apparent.

This “touch weapon” characteristic of edged weapons also gives them multi-directional capabilities equalling (and probably even surpassing in many ways) flexible weapons. What this means is that because edged weapons only really have to make contact with your skin to do damage, and don’t require mass transfer, high amounts of speed, or leverage, that attacks using them can come at any conceivable angle and can also change angles at any point in their trajectory and still cause serious damage. This multi-directional characteristic makes defending them with “precision defensive tactics” (defensive tactics based on high degrees of timing, exacting movements, or having a specific defensive based on a specific attack) problematic at best.

This is also the reason why it is highly likely that should you ever have to actually engage an edged weapon wielding opponent, that you will wind up getting cut by the weapon, and thus should mentally prepare yourself for that reality and go into the situation with the goal of surviving, not avoiding getting cut. I’m not saying to try to get cut, or that you shouldn’t attempt to avoid the edged weapon altogether, what I am saying is that if your goal is to avoid getting cut at all, then should you get cut (and again, if actually engaging someone with an edged weapon the likelihood of that happening is high), then your mental state will start to crumble and you may very well freeze or split your focus “stuck in the past attempting to figure out what you did wrong or reconciling the fact that you just got cut with your previous expectations” and thus no longer be fully focusing on the present and continuing to fight (which, especially when talking about an edged weapon, can quickly become a death sentence).

Finally on this point, this is why you should only engage an edged weapon wielding opponent while you yourself is unarmed as a last resort and should seek to escape, get a weapon yourself ( preferrably a better one), use obstacles/cover to impede the attacker’s access to you or at least try to stay far enough away from them so that your distance will protect you from the weapon’s ability to cause you harm and you can hopefully buy yourself enough time to utilize one of the other above mentioned options.


#10

The second point that Robert touched on that I wanted to address is the difference between someone using a weapon as a threat vs using it as a weapon.

Most of the “knife defense” taught in traditional Martial Arts/Self Defense systems is based on either someone using the knife as a threat or a “duel” style encounter. There is nothing wrong with this as “weapons as threats scenarios” are fairly common and therefore should be addressed and while duels are less common, they occasionally can happen.

In a “weapon as a threat” scenario an attacker wants you to know they have the weapon and will therefore show it to you or at least let you know they have it prior to actually using it to harm you. Such situations generally involve the attacker wanting something from you, so if you can comply with their demands (they want your money, jewelry, something that can be replaced or at least parted with) then doing so should always be a high priority option. Sometimes they truly are only looking for a fix or desperate for cash and giving them what they want will end the encounter and cause them to leave you alone. Such situations also always provide you with at least some time to attempt to improve your position and use verbal and postural self defense tactics to attempt to either talk your way out of danger or gain the element of surprise should you have to engage them or escape.

Such situations are where rehearsed “disarming techniques” are fairly useful, though, as you get more competent you should have your training partners try to confuse you with different positions, use different speech and intonation patterns, add stress inoculation tactics (like slapping you in the face to try to intimidate or fluster you, making yourself crazy tired beforehand to simulate the adrenaline dump of being faced with an edged weapon defense situation, etc…), and change the environment (practice in the dark, outside, in the cold, in the blistering sun, etc…). Adding in these elements will greatly increase the realism in your weapon defense training and thus better prepare you for a real situation and better allow you to remain as calm as possible under pressure and adapt to the situation as need be.

The second type of scenario that weapon defense fall under though is not addressed as often in traditional knife defense training and that is a “weapon as a weapon” scenarios. In these types of situations the attacker does not want you to know they are armed and will not give you any warning that they have it or are about to use it until they are. In such situations you generally are not going to have much if any opportunity to utilize verbal or postural self defense tactics, there are no demands to comply with or feign compliance with, and your attacker will either have the element of surprise or at the very least neither of you will (if you are very aware and really paying attention to them). Such attacks also generally involve multiple rapid fire attacks as the attacker attempts to overwhelm you with a “rush” of attacks and won’t be just a single stab or slash like most knife defense techniques are based on.

These are generally considered more dangerous (though both are potentially lethal) and more difficult to deal with. Awareness is definitely paramount in dealing with these types of scenarios and probably will make or break any attempts to defend against them as generally the opponent is not going to make themselves conspicuous in any way. The video that was posted in the OP showed a “weapon as a weapon” scenario as the knife wielding attacker never alerted Daniel that he had the knife until he had pulled it out and stabbed him. In that specific case, even if Danield had employed some effective defensive tactics after he realized he had been stabbed he still would have likely died (as unfortunately for him that first stab hit his heart).

Regarding the actual attack, again “precision” defenses are very difficult to pull off (but are possible providing you have put in the thousands of hours training them realistically and have the natural speed and reaction time to pull them off), so generally more “gross motor defensive skills” are preferable. These generally rely on placing less vital targets between you and the knife (similar to using an obstacle to protect yourself) and then “getting to the hit” as quickly as possible and not stopping your attack until you have either done enough damage to escape or disarm the attacker. This is crucial because, especially with edged weapons defense situations, you must minimize the timeframe of the encounter; every second (and with it number of attacks against you with the knife) longer that it goes on without you either damaging the opponent, gaining control of the weapon, or escaping will decrease your likelihood of surviving such a situation.


#11

Sento,
Two excellent and insightful posts. From my limited training in Kali and my own butt getting cut handling a domestic, your information is dead on. Since the OP has not checked in, let me thank you for taking the time from your schedule and sharing your experience. Good advise for all.


#12

Sorry for being a bit MIA, everyone, it’s been a rough few days in school. I wanted to make sure I had some presence of mind before I responded. Luckily, I’m graduating this year and will be done forever!

Thanks to everyone for the thoughtful posts, I really appreciate it. Special thanks to Sento for his last two posts, both of which were extremely insightful. I guess the answer is to train as much and as realistically as possible for the unfortunate possibility that you’ll have to face a situation like this. I’ll have to look around my area to see if I can find a school resembling any of the styles you mentioned, Sento. I hope I never have to face a situation like this, but I’ve wondered because the city I’m in tends to have a shooting/stabbing pretty frequently.

Robert A, I live in the U.S., so unfortunately don’t have access to those teachers.

Idaho and Sento, I might have missed it, but what does RMA stand for?

Thanks for the warm welcome, everyone, glad to be part of such a great forum.

P.S. pigeonkak, if you get a chance, I’d be interested in your next story.


#13

[quote]jgreever1167 wrote:
Sorry for being a bit MIA, everyone, it’s been a rough few days in school. I wanted to make sure I had some presence of mind before I responded. Luckily, I’m graduating this year and will be done forever!

Thanks to everyone for the thoughtful posts, I really appreciate it. Special thanks to Sento for his last two posts, both of which were extremely insightful. I guess the answer is to train as much and as realistically as possible for the unfortunate possibility that you’ll have to face a situation like this. I’ll have to look around my area to see if I can find a school resembling any of the styles you mentioned, Sento. I hope I never have to face a situation like this, but I’ve wondered because the city I’m in tends to have a shooting/stabbing pretty frequently.

Robert A, I live in the U.S., so unfortunately don’t have access to those teachers.

Idaho and Sento, I might have missed it, but what does RMA stand for?

Thanks for the warm welcome, everyone, glad to be part of such a great forum.

P.S. pigeonkak, if you get a chance, I’d be interested in your next story.[/quote]

It was a UK story, so I wasn’t sure. Sento’s list of instructors is good for the lower 48. Weapons laws in the U.S. also allow for being armed in many places as opposed to the UK.

RMA is “Reality Martial Art”.

School never really ends.

Train hard.

Stay safe.

Regards,

Robert A


#14

Sentoguy,

Fantastic posts. Thank you for taking the time to type that material out. I hope this gets a lot of traffic/views.

Now, in the interest of comedy.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
This “touch weapon” characteristic of edged weapons also gives them multi-directional capabilities equalling (and probably even surpassing in many ways) flexible weapons. [/quote]

Except edged weapons don’t suck. I hate flexible weapons. If Hell is the worst fate one can imagine than mine will be a never ending training session consisting of lead hand uppercuts and training with flexible weapons.

A cycle of

45min lead uppercuts

45min spin nunchaku

45min lead uppercuts

45min manriki gusari
repeat

Worst weapon ever: kusarigama

Take the worst fucking design for a knife, with almost no tang or stability, for shit penetration, and an angle that makes slashing and snap cuts difficult and then staple a fucking chain to it.

Regards,

Robert A


#15

"The second type of scenario that weapon defense fall under though is not addressed as often in traditional knife defense training and that is a “weapon as a weapon” scenarios. In these types of situations the attacker does not want you to know they are armed and will not give you any warning that they have it or are about to use it until they are.

In such situations you generally are not going to have much if any opportunity to utilize verbal or postural self defense tactics, there are no demands to comply with or feign compliance with, and your attacker will either have the element of surprise or at the very least neither of you will (if you are very aware and really paying attention to them). Such attacks also generally involve multiple rapid fire attacks as the attacker attempts to overwhelm you with a “rush” of attacks and won’t be just a single stab or slash like most knife defense techniques are based on.

These are generally considered more dangerous (though both are potentially lethal) and more difficult to deal with. Awareness is definitely paramount in dealing with these types of scenarios and probably will make or break any attempts to defend against them as generally the opponent is not going to make themselves conspicuous in any way.

The video that was posted in the OP showed a “weapon as a weapon” scenario as the knife wielding attacker never alerted Daniel that he had the knife until he had pulled it out and stabbed him. In that specific case, even if Danield had employed some effective defensive tactics after he realized he had been stabbed he still would have likely died (as unfortunately for him that first stab hit his heart)."

OP,
Since you seem serious about this subject, I want you to re-read Sento’s excellent explaination on the second attacker scenario. I am posting a picture of my left arm, slashed by a female on a domestic call I was on. Not for the “wow” factor, but, to demonstrate how arrogance and stupidity can get you hurt. It happened very fast, no warning, no threats, just a direct attack with no verbal warning and I was lucky. Learn from Sento’s and Robert’s posts. Train Hard, Stay Safe.


#16

[quote]Robert A wrote:
Sentoguy,

Fantastic posts. Thank you for taking the time to type that material out. I hope this gets a lot of traffic/views.

Now, in the interest of comedy.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
This “touch weapon” characteristic of edged weapons also gives them multi-directional capabilities equalling (and probably even surpassing in many ways) flexible weapons. [/quote]

Except edged weapons don’t suck. I hate flexible weapons. If Hell is the worst fate one can imagine than mine will be a never ending training session consisting of lead hand uppercuts and training with flexible weapons.

A cycle of

45min lead uppercuts

45min spin nunchaku

45min lead uppercuts

45min manriki gusari
repeat

Worst weapon ever: kusarigama

Take the worst fucking design for a knife, with almost no tang or stability, for shit penetration, and an angle that makes slashing and snap cuts difficult and then staple a fucking chain to it.

Regards,

Robert A[/quote]

Totally agree, but, hey, would we not look cool using one…LOL


#17

jgreever, where are you located in the US?

Lol about about the flexible weapons. Other than the manriki gusari though (and even that would be debatable), all of those weapons you mentioned are technically what we refer to as “combination weapons”. For instance Nunchaku would be a combination of impact and flexible, kusarigama (which I actually feel is a pretty useful though admittedly not very practical in today’s world, but I would add that my knowledge and understanding of using one pretty much comes directly from Hatsumi Sensei via Robert Bussey>James Rosenback>Walt Lysak> Me, so that understanding is more total in nature than how I see a lot of people utilize or teach the weapon) would be a combination of an edged weapon, an impact weapon, and a flexible weapon.

Purely flexible weapons would be things like hand straps, a rolled up t-shirt, a rope, a whip, a garden hose, a chain, a belt, essentially a weapon that pretty much is only useful for wrapping and entangling. Such weapons can be really effective for controlling and can be great if you are good at grappling and understand how to utilize them for that. Knowledge of use of such weapons, although definitely not as lethal or incapacitating as things like edged, impact, or projectile weapons, does open up another door to improvised options that otherwise would not be there for you.

For instance, should I have to deal with an edged weapon, if I am skilled using flexible weapons I could take off my pants belt or shirt and at least be armed against the blade rather than unarmed; definitely not the ideal scenario and if I could get my hands on an edged long range impact or projectile weapon I would certainly prefer those options, but still better than being unarmed. Of course this would also need to occur in “active combat” as I wouldn’t have to to deploy such a weapon against an ambush, nor would I attempt it in a “weapon as a threat” scenario unless I had already damaged and or attempted to escape and been unable to finish the job (in which case I would be in “active combat”).

I’ve gotta admit that I also find them fun to use, but hey different strokes. :slight_smile:


#18

[quote]idaho wrote:
Totally agree, but, hey, would we not look cool using one…LOL
[/quote]

You would.

I wear my heart on my sleeve too much. I think the look on my face would take away any cool points.


#19

Sentoguy,

It actually doesn’t surprise me that you would know people who can use such things. I figure someone must, and it seems like you either know the guy, or know a guy who does for damn near everything martial arts related.

I would love to know if any of the people listed, yourself included, would prefer such weapons to more conventional fare? My issue is kama take up the same real estate as tomahawks and axes, and those are very robust, don’t suck at all, and can still be used as a rudimentary billhook if needed. IF someone is not in a particular place and time where kama were usual, expected, and allowed but other things were banned than why? Axes may not have the cool “reaping” mechanic but an ax to the side of the knee or an arm should get noticed just the same. Also, most folks can’t cut through shit with the kind of reaping they demo with kamas. I am sure you and your people actually put a bit of work into it and can, but damn have I wathced folks come up short trying to wow me with demo cutting.

Adding the chain and ball gets even goofier for me. Chucking something at a dude’s face and closing is great, but do I have to have that something tethered to my damn blade? Everyone I have ever met, let alone trained with/under, who could make even the “combination” weapons work well were even more dangerous with something like a sword, jo, ect. I am unmoved by someone who can easily kick my ass with fucking stick (I mean jo, obviously a very special martial arts weapon and embodiment of all that is aiki. Or some shit. It is a stick.) being able to still do ok with something more complicated. All the demo work seems like it was a burn more calories for the same result kind of affair and I really don’t enjoy that.

I have seen and trained certain “disarms” and traps with flexible, I guess combination, weapons but nothing blew my skirt up and said “This is way more robust than just getting off line, parrying, ect. and/or cutting down or cracking the asshole with your sword/stick/other non goofy weapon.” Add any kind of multiple attackers/chaos and I like the swingy shit even less.

All in all I would rather have a framing hammer than a pair of nunchaku, kama, chain, ect. if I was going to face leaving this world as I entered it. You know, covered in someone else’s blood and screaming my fucking head off.

Naked.

Just cause I am not going to use them for fancy weapon trapping doesn’t mean I have to keep my pants on, right?

Right?

Regards,

Robert A


#20

Speaking of the hatchet attack in NYC, I am going to post this in the “knife Defense” thread also. I am firmly committed to visualization as training tool for mental preparedness. Whether you are planning on explosive entry or simply walking down a crowded street, a small corner of your awareness should be evaluating attack points, exit routes, and it unarmed, any useful object in your area that can be used as a emergency weapon.

Take the photo for example: confined area, it appears one escape route is cut off,(subway?), scum is already in the process of active threat, deadly weapon, scum is hell bent on killing you. Each here should think about how to survive this attack and have a mental plan to activate. Food for thought.

I posted this in the “situational Awareness” thread, but, all who are following this thread, give some serious thought on how you would survive this attack.