T Nation

Knee Frustrations


#1

This issue started maybe ten weeks ago. I have no mobility issues. I can squat equipped-style wide or olympic ATG, knees behind or in front of the toes, feet at whatever angle necessary. I've tried squatting in Chucks and in .75inch oly squat shoes. Regardless of width, hip angle, knee angle, foot angle, all of it - whenever I near parallel there is an audible, almost grinding sound in my left knee, in both the eccentric and concentric, no matter the load.

It causes pain afterwards and is truly frustrating. I took a week off entirely and the pain went away. However, I just did my some test bodyweight squats at home and the problem is still there. I'm contemplating seeing a physiotherapist but figured I would reach out to the internet for any help or experience with this issue. Anything is appreciated. Thanks.


#2

Apart from the obvious shit loads of foam rolling and stretching, band terminal knee extensions help me, give it a try


#3

Your first “contemplation” was correct. It usually is. Go see a physiotherapist (whatever that is) or an orthopedic sports doctor. It ain’t like it was 20 years ago. There are actual doctors, that just like you, like to lift and workout. AND are actually interested in helping injured athletes get back to the sport they love.

These guys/girls actually study for years on exactly how to do this. Its their living and for most their passion as well. Yeah sure there are the old school doc’s who will just shake their head and say “stop lifting”. DON’T GO TO THEM. And they will eventually go away.
Take some time to find a “good” sports doctor. Its worth it.

Or you can take the advice of some idiot online who couldn’t tell you what the difference is between an ACL or an MCL or how to correctly spell the words. Like me.
Oh yeah, my advice? the online idiot…have you tried wrapping your knees? Its done wonders for me.

But seriously. Use your computer to help you find a passionate sports doc in your neck of the woods.

LB


#4

I booked an appointment immediately after making this thread and saw a physiotherapist this evening. It’s a probable Vastus Lateralis tear/strain. This is pleasing because my knee ligaments are all healthy and strong apparently. He recommends direct massage on the area and other means of active recovery. If that fails, time off from squatting (3+ weeks). Yikes. Thanks for the replies though!


#5

Outstanding!

oh, and if he/she says stop squatting for 3 weeks…DO IT.

You will be absolutely shocked how quickly you will bounce back once your healthy. Most guys think they have to “train through the pain” and wind up on the operating table and then in the bar tell girls how much they “use to lift” before they had to have surgery.
Your muscles have memory and will bounce back really fast. Don’t believe me. Google search:

Waxman’s Gym and Ilya Ilin. Look at the photos of Ilin taken last Dec when he was over giving a seminar. Dude hadn’t touched a weight since he won gold in London and can’t weight more than 175 lbs at Waxman’s.
In january he decided to start lift again.
He’s now 230 lbs and clean-n-jerking 242 kg!
Muscle memory, olympic champion style. Your muscles will respond the same once everything is healthy.

Or, you can just "train through the pain"
i’m told girls like scar’s

LB


#6

You might just be one of those people who were not built to squat. In my experience, most people who say they can’t squat atg are pussies, content with their 300 pound quarter squat, or who don’t want to work on their flexibility. You, on the other hand, sound like you really aren’t made for squatting. I would reccomend seeking some professional advice.


#7

[quote]LBramble wrote:
There are actual doctors, that just like you, like to lift and workout. AND are actually interested in helping injured athletes get back to the sport they love.

These guys/girls actually study for years on exactly how to do this. Its their living and for most their passion as well. Yeah sure there are the old school doc’s who will just shake their head and say “stop lifting”. DON’T GO TO THEM. And they will eventually go away.[/quote]

This is 100% false. Most, like 90% of, PTs ARE those old school docs that tell you to stop lifting and most of them are not lifters. The amount of PTs and doctors that are lifters themselves are rare. Everything is done by the book. These kids that are in physiotherapy and kinesiology are exactly the safe ones, the people that aren’t willing to push their bodies to the absolute max just to see how much they can take. They don’t experiment on themselves, they aren’t willing to get injuries in pursuit of greater performance.

That’s not to say you have to be stupid about it, you have to be smart about it so you don’t get an injury in the first place, but the more you push the higher your chance is and most PTs just aren’t willing to go there. In my experience, whenever I went against the advice of a PT I fixed myself. That’s why I don’t go to PTs anymore.

Definitely go for it and see a PT/sports doctor, BUT be very careful who you listen to, do background checks on PTs and sports doctors.

I’m willing to bet your posterior chain is not as strong as you think it is and not as active as you think it is. Sounds like tendinitis. Sleeping hams and glutes will do that to a squat. I had your exact issue. Haven’t had it since I started doing a ton of posterior work and activating my posterior in general. Also loosen up your femoral erectors and hip flexors.


#8

My shoulder surgeon was absolutely jacked…and did terrific work on my shoulder.
Not to mention hooking me up with some primo test once things had healed up and i was back in the gym. His PT guys were the same way.
The key words being “not to mention”

Your hang with the wrong crowd of doc’s bro.

LB


#9

[quote]Haldor wrote:
I’m willing to bet your posterior chain is not as strong as you think it is and not as active as you think it is. Sounds like tendinitis. Sleeping hams and glutes will do that to a squat. I had your exact issue. Haven’t had it since I started doing a ton of posterior work and activating my posterior in general. Also loosen up your femoral erectors and hip flexors.
[/quote]
My so-called “posterior chain” is my strength in the lower lifts. My weak point in squat is at the quad take over, “half squat” junction, and in the deadlift off the floor.

An update: assaulting the vastus lateralis on my left side with rolling and massage, slowing my eccentric in the squat, stretching my quads and actually letting my hamstrings tighten a bit (I learned I have hypermobile knees and looser than normal hamstrings since I have always put a lot of focus into keeping them loose), adding single leg leg extensions once a week and avoiding twisting my knee inwards have all but relieved the pain and discomfort.

My ligaments are healthy and this is a muscular issue that is being taken care of. All is mostly well (and hopefully will stay that way!).