T Nation

Kim Jong Il Dead...

[quote]Grneyes wrote:

[quote]Schwarzfahrer wrote:
wow.
That’s good news!

Hard to believe it’s from natural cause.

Anyway, when compared to Saddam and possibly Lybia’s ex-president, his death can only bring potentially good tidings for koreans. It literally can’t get worse for them.

That is, if no general wants to come out on top with lots of sabre-rattlin’.
Which might end ugly.

Big question is how the chinese will handle the new guys, and what their general plans are with the peninsula.
I’d safely bet that a cleptocratic regime a la Myanmar will get Beijing’s blessing.

viceland dot com /vice travel guide) has some great videos about NK.[/quote]

I’m sorry, what? His son is crazier and more militant than he is. He has said, on more than one occasion, that he WILL reunite the two Koreas, whether South Korea wants it or not. Most of the Asian countries around N. Korea, excepting China, have held emergency meetings to discuss the fallout of Kim Jong Il dying. This is NOT a good thing. He was like God to them. This is like Jesus Christ dying all over again. [/quote]

Are you sure? I thought we know next to nothing about his son.

Dictator offspring traditionally has a hard time consolidating power.
If we take a look at the world, most dictatorships today face some serious turmoil when the royal scourge begins to rot.
Or from a different perspective:
It seem difficult to hand over the “reigns”, that’s why the Egyptian or the Lybian dude were too old for their own good.

So I assume -out of my ass- that the real power now is concentrated in the hands of Jong Un(?)'s advisers.
As it was probably already the case when Il Sung was getting feeble.

Then again, it’s NK and whose gods know what’s going on there?!
For all we know, they could just empower some pasty-faced, semi-retarded kid (he looks young, how old is he?) to be their new half god king.

NK will do what China wants them to do. They get all there money, food, natural resources mainly from China. Do not forget that NK is nothing but a puppet state for China. Worst case scenario is a military coup along with a lot of sable rattling towards SK.

In Memoriam…

Oh come on, SOMEONE had to do it.

On the note of succession – Kim Jong Il took over after the death of and maintained the same traditions as his father, who pretty much streamlined this concept of the semi-divine communist dictator/emperor for modern Korea. It’s close to impossible for an amateur to make any reasonable predictions about such a closed society, but the precedent for such a transition does exist in this nation/culture. I would suspect that Kim at least tried to get the succession in order.

[quote]LHT wrote:
In Memoriam…

Oh come on, SOMEONE had to do it.

On the note of succession – Kim Jong Il took over after the death of and maintained the same traditions as his father, who pretty much streamlined this concept of the semi-divine communist dictator/emperor for modern Korea. It’s close to impossible for an amateur to make any reasonable predictions about such a closed society, but the precedent for such a transition does exist in this nation/culture. I would suspect that Kim at least tried to get the succession in order.[/quote]

This is true, however, Kim Jong Il had 20 years under his father to study and perfect his ways. This kid, who is barely 30, had only 2 years of tutelage under Kim Jong Il. The advisers will play a huge role in keeping everything going, however, I think the kid has his own mind and will come into his own soon enough. Kim Jong Sung was titled the “Eternal President” so his son took a different title, General Secretary. He was also, by constitutional law, called “supreme leader”. He was also referred to as the “Dear Leader”, “our Father”, “the General” and “Generalissimo” and his son is already titled “Great Successor”. This is no ordinary family…they mean to stay where they are, by any means necessary. There will be no “Korean Spring” rising up for equal treatment and stuff like that. The military, police, and other state run organizations will stop it before the thought even enters someone’s head. It’s '1984" come to real life.

I think it’s ironic that a country that is known for such tyranny and oppression of it’s people is officially called Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

I stand by what I said about Tiger. He was a GOOD golfer, but now his status is there with Charlie. Plus he didn’t even die.

[quote]UtahLama wrote:
Can’t tell if joking or if you had not heard of The GLORIOUS LEADERS magnificent 36 under par round…the first time he ever played, including 11 holes-in-one.

GREATEST GOLFER EVAR!![/quote]

Well, I can’t say I’ll miss him. I hope that some good comes of it, and hopefully some stability and “non-insanity” but it’s hard to see that outcome. I pray for the people of Korea.

[quote]pgtips wrote:

[quote]Edevus wrote:

Just saw this on the news.

It made me laugh. Untill I thought that a good percentage are crying cause there scared of the consequences of not crying.

[/quote]

If that is what you believe then you know nothing about the North Koreans or Korean culture. The Korean culture has similarities to the Japanese because that is where the Japanese got their culture from. Back when Korea had a king he was revered like a god in much the same way as the Japanese emperor was revered by the Japanese.

I’ve forgotten the Korean term for this practice, but in North Korea the Kim’s have latched on to this traditional aspect of Korean culture and used it for themselves. They are revered as if they are god. That grieving is probably legit and it is a sign of what we have to deal with.

[quote]kneedragger79 wrote:
I stand by what I said about Tiger. He was a GOOD golfer, but now his status is there with Charlie. Plus he didn’t even die.

[quote]UtahLama wrote:
Can’t tell if joking or if you had not heard of The GLORIOUS LEADERS magnificent 36 under par round…the first time he ever played, including 11 holes-in-one.

GREATEST GOLFER EVAR!![/quote]
[/quote]

I guess the world will never have the pleasure of watching these two magnificent golfers go head to head. I hate to say it, but this is probably a good thing for Tiger’s legacy. After all, he never shot a round of 36 under par.