T Nation

Kidnapped Iraqi Archbishop Dead

"Kidnapped Iraqi archbishop dead

Archbishop Rahho’s body was found buried near Mosul
An archbishop seized by gunmen last month in Iraq has been found dead.
The body of Paulos Faraj Rahho, the Chaldean Catholic archbishop of Mosul, was found in a shallow grave close to the city.

Pope Benedict XVI said he was profoundly moved and saddened, calling the archbishop’s death an act of inhuman violence.

Archbishop Rahho was kidnapped not long after he left mass in Mosul, in northern Iraq, on 29 February.

According to the SIR Catholic news agency, the kidnappers told Iraqi church officials on Wednesday that Archbishop Rahho was very ill and, later on the same day, that he was dead.

IRAQ’S CHALDEAN CHRISTIANS
550,000 Chaldeans, forming majority of Iraq’s Christians
Eastern-rite Church with liturgical language, Syriac, descended from Aramaic
Autonomous from Rome but recognises Pope’s authority
Spiritual leader Patriarch Emmanuel III Delly, based in Baghdad

Who are the Chaldeans?
However, Iraqi police say the condition of the archbishop’s body suggests that he may have died at least a week ago.

It is not clear whether he was killed, or died of natural causes. Nobody has claimed responsibility for his death.

The archbishop’s body was found by church workers who went to the area after being contacted by the kidnappers.

‘Horrible crime’

The archbishop, 65, was the latest in a long line of Chaldean clerics to be abducted in Iraq since the US-led invasion in March 2003.

Many Christians in Iraq have left due to insurgent attacks
Three people who were with him at the time, a driver and two guards, were killed by the gunmen.

Only last Sunday, Pope Benedict had appealed for the archbishop’s release.

A Vatican spokesman, Father Federico Lombardi, said: "The most absurd and unjustified violence continues to afflict the Iraqi people and in particular the small Christian community, whom the Pope holds in his prayers in this time of deep sadness.

“This tragic event underscored once more and with more urgency the duty of all, and in particular of the international community, to bring peace to a country that has been so tormented.”

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki said those behind the kidnapping would not escape justice.

It was, he said, a “horrible crime” by “a criminal, terrorist gang”.

The Chaldeans are the largest sect within Iraq’s Christian community, which was estimated at 800,000 before the overthrow of Saddam Hussein.

Many have left their homes after attacks linked to the continuing insurgency."

BBC Website

Someone on the forums recently asked how the Christians in Iraq were fairing. I guess this is an indication that along with most other people, they are suffering.

[quote]new2training wrote:
Someone on the forums recently asked how the Christians in Iraq were fairing. I guess this is an indication that along with most other people, they are suffering.
[/quote]

Yeah, that was me. But to be honest, I already had an idea of how bad things had become for them. I doubt they feel very liberated.

May he rest in peace.

This is bad news for Iraqis. It will only further increase the already existing inter-faith divide.

Here’s what one Chaldean Iraqi had to say:

My local parish bulletin often has articles about the plight of the Iraqi Catholics. The Chaldean Catholics have been suffering the brunt of the blowback from the American Invasion, so much so that Saddam’s reign of terror is starting to look like “the good ol’ days”. Here is one of two articles that were in to-day’s bulletin.

http://www.kaldaya.net/2008/DailyNews/03/March10_08_E2.html

This is the biggest reason to oppose the war, right here.

Jorge Arbusto BOOOOSH doesn’t seem to care one iota what happens to the Christians there, in Kosovo, or the rest of the places he meddles.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7294078.stm

Link to original article.

The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

[quote]lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm [/quote]

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?[/quote]

Like it or not, the invasion of Iraq by the United States boosted radical Islamist movements. It maybe due to a president who claims to be doing “God’s work” or that a good chunk of the American military is Christian, but that particular war was largely perceived as some sort of crusade. The situation in the Occupied Territories and Washington’s rhetoric towards Tehran didn’t help either.

If Israel invaded the USA tomorrow, you can be sure that plenty of your compatriots will start torching synagogues and that fundamentalism will rise. If Tunisia bombed and invaded your land, a lot of Americans will start lashing out at Muslims, no matter how much you think your country is homogeneous.

The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.

[quote]PRCalDude wrote:
This is the biggest reason to oppose the war, right here.

Jorge Arbusto BOOOOSH doesn’t seem to care one iota what happens to the Christians there, in Kosovo, or the rest of the places he meddles. [/quote]

Agreed, maybe not the biggest reason, but one of. One of the oldest Christian communities in the world is being destroyed, and we’re to blame, good intentions or not.

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?[/quote]

What is yours? Do you think in the absence of law and order that religious groups tend to peacefully coexist? Anywhere? Ever? There is nothing unpredictable or unique about this.

[quote]lixy wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?

Like it or not, the invasion of Iraq by the United States boosted radical Islamist movements. It maybe due to a president who claims to be doing “God’s work” or that a good chunk of the American military is Christian, but that particular war was largely perceived as some sort of crusade. The situation in the Occupied Territories and Washington’s rhetoric towards Tehran didn’t help either.

If Israel invaded the USA tomorrow, you can be sure that plenty of your compatriots will start torching synagogues and that fundamentalism will rise. If Tunisia bombed and invaded your land, a lot of Americans will start lashing out at Muslims, no matter how much you think your country is homogeneous.

The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.[/quote]

And the odds of Isreal invading us cmon be realistic…but since where on this fantasy subject what if we injected mountain gorrillas with a formula that makes them super smart give them clubs and set them loose in the middle east would that make them pissed? YOU BET

[quote]vaske135 wrote:
And the odds of Isreal invading us cmon be realistic…but since where on this fantasy subject what if we injected mountain gorrillas with a formula that makes them super smart give them clubs and set them loose in the middle east would that make them pissed? YOU BET [/quote]

Don’t forget the sharks with lasers!

[quote]lixy wrote:
The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.[/quote]

Is this a threat?

After 9-11, I don’t remember a lot of Mosques being burnt to the ground. If anything like you mention was going to happen, it would have happened then.

And if we are attacked again, like you threaten, who’s to say there won’t be some kind of spontaneous backlash against Muslims in the US the next time?

[quote]lixy wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?

Like it or not, the invasion of Iraq by the United States boosted radical Islamist movements. It maybe due to a president who claims to be doing “God’s work” or that a good chunk of the American military is Christian, but that particular war was largely perceived as some sort of crusade. The situation in the Occupied Territories and Washington’s rhetoric towards Tehran didn’t help either.

If Israel invaded the USA tomorrow, you can be sure that plenty of your compatriots will start torching synagogues and that fundamentalism will rise. If Tunisia bombed and invaded your land, a lot of Americans will start lashing out at Muslims, no matter how much you think your country is homogeneous.

The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.[/quote]

You sound more and more like a terrorist everyday. You make a good point…then ruin it by putting your own dick in ya mouth.

[quote]Gkhan wrote:
Is this a threat? [/quote]

Depends how you define “threat”.

Don’t compare a criminal act (however notable) with a state-sanctioned full-blown attack, invasion and occupation of a country.

If any majority Muslim country did to your country what the latter has done to Iraq, there will be burnt mosques.

Maybe. In any case, it will be easily controllable. Well, unless the attack decapitates your leadership and neutralizes your armed forces.

[quote]Gkhan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.

Is this a threat?

After 9-11, I don’t remember a lot of Mosques being burnt to the ground. If anything like you mention was going to happen, it would have happened then.

And if we are attacked again, like you threaten, who’s to say there won’t be some kind of spontaneous backlash against Muslims in the US the next time?

[/quote]

‘Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, members of these groups, and those perceived to be members of these groups, have been the victims of increased numbers of bias-related assaults, threats, vandalism and arson.’

http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/legalinfo/nordwg_mission.html

It’s not as bad as in Iraq, obviously, but they are in a state of anarchy. It shouldn’t be anywhere near as bad as Iraq.

Edit; forgot to mention the groups were ‘Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and South-Asian Americans’

[quote]lixy wrote:

If any majority Muslim country did to your country what the latter has done to Iraq, there will be burnt mosques.
[/quote]

You are fantasizing that any islamic country could even get over here to occupy us.

You are third world idiots at best. Oh, you have some extremely smart folks - but collectively could not pour piss out of a boot.

Hell - you can’t even get rid of Israel.

Do your fantasizing elsewhere.

I don’t think there should be a mosque left standing in Iraq, at least not the ones that were used by your terrorist brothers as hiding places. And exempts very few mosques.

State sanctioned? It’s a fucking war. When you stop thinking you can beat us, and finally stop shooting at us. More importantly, when your brothers in murder stop killing innocent people we will probably stop what we are doing and send most everyone home. Well…save for the construction crews needed to build permanent military installations for a long term(30 - 40 years) US military presence in Iraq.

[quote]Big_Boss wrote:
lixy wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?

Like it or not, the invasion of Iraq by the United States boosted radical Islamist movements. It maybe due to a president who claims to be doing “God’s work” or that a good chunk of the American military is Christian, but that particular war was largely perceived as some sort of crusade. The situation in the Occupied Territories and Washington’s rhetoric towards Tehran didn’t help either.

If Israel invaded the USA tomorrow, you can be sure that plenty of your compatriots will start torching synagogues and that fundamentalism will rise. If Tunisia bombed and invaded your land, a lot of Americans will start lashing out at Muslims, no matter how much you think your country is homogeneous.

The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.

You sound more and more like a terrorist everyday. You make a good point…then ruin it by putting your own dick in ya mouth. [/quote]

I don’t get your point. How does predicting a very likely event make me sound “like a terrorist”? If you think waging wars and building bases on sovereign countries have no repercussions, you should reevaluate your position.

[quote]lixy wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
lixy wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
lixy wrote:
The BBC’s Hugh Sykes in Baghdad says centuries of peaceful coexistence between Muslims and the small Christian community in Iraq were shattered by the US-led invasion of 2003.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7295672.stm

Because Americans forced them to fight?

Do Muslims have to be ruled with an iron fist to stop them from brutalizing infidels? Is that your point?

Like it or not, the invasion of Iraq by the United States boosted radical Islamist movements. It maybe due to a president who claims to be doing “God’s work” or that a good chunk of the American military is Christian, but that particular war was largely perceived as some sort of crusade. The situation in the Occupied Territories and Washington’s rhetoric towards Tehran didn’t help either.

If Israel invaded the USA tomorrow, you can be sure that plenty of your compatriots will start torching synagogues and that fundamentalism will rise. If Tunisia bombed and invaded your land, a lot of Americans will start lashing out at Muslims, no matter how much you think your country is homogeneous.

The point is that this death, and so many others, is attributable to the US invasion of Iraq. And trust me, your country is yet to suffer backlashes from that gratuitous act of violence.

You sound more and more like a terrorist everyday. You make a good point…then ruin it by putting your own dick in ya mouth.

I don’t get your point. How does predicting a very likely event make me sound “like a terrorist”? If you think waging wars and building bases on sovereign countries have no repercussions, you should reevaluate your position.[/quote]

I’m not the one to worry about re-adjusting “positions.”

[quote]rainjack wrote:
When you stop thinking you can beat us, and finally stop shooting at us. [/quote]

That’s a good point. I do not think any country on the face of this planet can beat the US militarily. Hell, half of the world could unite against you and have their asses handed to them. That much I know.

The mistake you are making, is underestimate the drive and motivation of a people who perceive you as occupiers. I said it before and will say it again: As long as there is an Iraqi standing, your troops will be shot at. It’s simple really. You may do the same if some foreigners were patrolling your streets and jailing, torturing or killing your people.