T Nation

Kettlebells?

Anyone here working out with kettlebells? What is your opinion?

I have used them many times…I think ther are awesome. Lot of cool excersises that you can do. For bodybuilding purposes I dont see any difference between KBs and DBs but for strength they are pretty versatile…for example the bottoms up press is great it involves your grip to a high degree. We use to flip them in the air and catch the handles as they came back around, that gets tricky as the KB gets heavier.

I think that they are great for GPP and conditioning. If you are a millionaire and can afford a variety of sizes, they could be a great asset for strength/hypertrophy training.

yeah, got a load 2nd hand.

use them when i cant get to gym, or gpp style. good for thowing!

[quote]Johnrn wrote:
I think that they are great for GPP and conditioning. If you are a millionaire and can afford a variety of sizes, they could be a great asset for strength/hypertrophy training.[/quote]

I agree fully. To have a variety would cost an arm and a leg. I had one KB and I sold it. Why? Not because I didnt enjoy it. Because for the price of a complete set of nine singles will cost you over $1000. So it will cost $2000 for pairs. This doesnt include shipping. $255 and $510. If you can afford the wholeset at once, I would ask for price and shipping discounts.

I loved my KB. I even painted in bright orange. The workouts were great and addicting. Outside KBing in the fresh air is why I bought one to try… I even purchased Mike Mahlers MMA KB workout DVD. Mike does some great shit with KBs and training. I just couldnt justify the price for a full set, not the 3 piece set offered which is still one each and not a pair. Instead, I bought a “gun” rack, 600 oly set, bench, lat machine(upper and lower cables), and dip station all made to commercial specs from a local gym supply company for less than the cost of a complete paired 9 KB set. I Also fitted my basement floor with padding, bought a sled, a 55 gallon sealable drum, jump rope, built a pullup station outside, and a case of Lowenbrau. My wife even started working out when she saw how I turned part of the basement into a freeweight gym.

All in all. Are they worth it financially and as a training device? That is for you to decide. If you can afford them I dont think you will be disappointed. I wasnt disappointed at all. I just felt I got more bang for my buck elsewhere.

Good Luck

I started to type a response but after a while I realized…hmm, I’ve already written this. So from my book “Renegade Training for Football” here’s my take:

“Kettlebell work should be an instrumental portion of any lifting program and is a tremendously functional portion of the Renegade programs. Athletes who perform kettle bell lifts not only develop a superb understanding of muscular harmony and balance but also develop powerful tendons that are suitable for long-term strength work. Coaches find kettle bells an extraordinary medium, as it provides the perfect setting for training groups in an efficient manner. Kettlebell training is possibly one of the best mediums to vary strength training outside of use of barbells. Athletes are able to perform the motions of the Olympic lifts using the bell.”

Now that being said if you have a chance you can get some great information and DVD’s from people like Pavel Tsatsouline, Mike Mahler and I even put out a 2-part DVD on kb training. If you havn’t had a chance take a look at some of Mike’s work - he’s a top notch source of information and great coach. You couldn’t do better.

I hope that helps.

In faith,

Coach Davies

We’ve got some adjustable kettlebell handles here at the office from the folks at Iron Woody. Maybe we’ll start a thread soon and ask who wants one to try out. Sort of an informal T-Jack. Would anyone be interested in that? Would you try it and then tell the board what you thought?

I would be interested.

i doubt you’d ship to UK though.

Been kb’ing for 1.5 years on and off.

alwats been dubious of adjustable KB’s but would entertain beon disproved.

Another possibility that I am thnking of buying (rather than the handles).

http://www.uskettlebells.com/productinfo.html

For $200 you get an adjustable kettlebell (35, 42.5, 45.5, 49.5, 53,56.5, 60.5, 64, and 70.5 lbs)

Has anyone tried these?

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
We’ve got some adjustable kettlebell handles here at the office from the folks at Iron Woody. Maybe we’ll start a thread soon and ask who wants one to try out. Sort of an informal T-Jack. Would anyone be interested in that? Would you try it and then tell the board what you thought?

[/quote]

I sure as hell would. I could compare to my standard KB, too.

I would love to try it out. I’m pretty experienced with KB’s, but can’t afford them. Just in time for spring weather too!

Chris, I’d definitely want to try out the Iron Woody KB handles. I bought the KB handle from KettleStack, and thought i had a good deal after they reduced the price to $65.

then i visit Iron Woody and see their KB handle is selling for $70 for A PAIR!

from what i can tell on the website, the Iron Woody handle pretty much looks like the KettleStack.

I think you will either love them or have no interest in them. I had the 36lber at one time, but I just couldn’t get into it like regular weights, so I sold it.

A lot of people love them though.

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
We’ve got some adjustable kettlebell handles here at the office from the folks at Iron Woody. Maybe we’ll start a thread soon and ask who wants one to try out. Sort of an informal T-Jack. Would anyone be interested in that? Would you try it and then tell the board what you thought?

[/quote]

Shugs, I would be very interested in trying these out. I had a handle from PDA which I did not like and currently have a few cast KBs so I have a pretty good base for comparison. And if I don’t like the handle I will gladly give it away to a T-Nation denizen once I am done with the review - that’s only fair.

Also, what’s the procedure for getting a product T-Jacked? I think the US Kettlebell adjustable would be a very good T-Jack item. I met Greg, one of the guys who started the company, at a KB competition in Chicago and he is a stand up guy. They will also be coming out with a “bulldog kit,” which you purchase separately, that will allow you to assemble a KB up to 105 lbs. This is a cool product. Had they come out sooner with these before I purchased all of my cast KBs I would have purchased 2 of the US KBs and called it a complete set.

I certainly would like to compare the Iron Woody adjustable kettlebell handles to my DragonDoor kettlebells. I have my doubts that the adjustable handles are “safe” for ballistic movements like swings, snatches, etc. Heck, even overhead presses may be risky. I find my Dragondoor kettlebells (1) are great for working out at home (2) bring a “fun” factor to exercising and (3) are easy to use in the great outdoors.

Id love to try the Iron Woody’s handles out.

They arent cheap but the guys I trained with had full sets up to like 70 or 80 lbs. KBs. We would train in Greenlake park in Seattle. Now that I think of it there are KB clubs in a few places where people get together bring the KBs and workout. It was cool for me cause I was broke and couldnt afford them but got to use the whole range. Training outside you can drop them, on the grass, which I felt saved a lot of where and tear on my joints…no eccentric faster recovery. Let me know what area your in and I can find out if there is a KB club that trains there.

Chris,

I would definetely give the Iron Woody handles a try and a review for fellow T-mag readers. That would also give me a chance to try them out before forking out the cash for the kbells from dragon door. I emailed Mike Mahler and he thought that I should start with a 53lbs and a 70lbs kettlebell. What type of weight can go in the handles and be safe?

I’d love to give the KB handles a try

Okay, here is my take on the whole KB thing. First off, I’ll state that I am a huge KB fan. I have competed in KB competitions and acted as a referee for one. Yes, we do have KB competitions here in the US. This sport is new in the US, but competitions in Eastern Europe and the various republics of the former Soviet Union (because there are too many to list individually) have been going on for years.

I am involved in the North American Kettlebell Federation (NAKF) which sanctions US competitions. Yes, it’s a real organization. Some people may snicker at the idea of KB meets, but it is something I enjoy. KB C&Js and snatches for reps combine a decent strength workout and an excellent cardio workout all in one. I would very much like to see the sport grow in the US, so yes, I have an interest in seeing KBs being sold.

However, I also don’t like the “cult” mentality, and I’m not going to say that KBs are the greatest thing to hit the training world since protein powder just because I enjoy using them. They are not an indispensable tool – anything you can do with a KB you can do with barbells and dumbbells. I have found that certain exercises are more fun and less awkward to perform with a KB than with a DB. For instance, when I did one-arm snatches with a DB, I would frequently hit the inside of my thigh with the edge of the DB and get some good bruises. KBs are narrower than DBs so this no longer happens. It’s also a bit easier to clean 2 KBs than it is to clean a barbell. However, “more fun” and “less awkward” does not equal “indispensable.”

Consider this analogy when comparing KBs to DBs and barbells: If you wanted to learn the Olympic lifts, would you rather use a cheap barbell or get an Eleiko set with bumper plates and a lifting platform? Of course you’d want the Eleiko. Problem is, the Eleiko bar alone sells for around $400 - $500, and adding in bumpers and a platform will run the tab into the $2,000 range. You can get a $150 Olympic set at any sporting goods store and it will work just fine. It won’t be optimal, but it will work. Fortunately, KBs aren’t nearly as expensive, but the idea is the same. Training with KBs is better and more fun, but a barbell and DBs will work just fine.