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Kettlebells for Powerlifting

Basically I was just wondering on what you guys think about GPP work with kettlebells to assist in powerlifting. Currently I have 7 kettlebells; 2-35s 2-52s 2-70s and 1-88.

The 35s and the 88 are going to be for sale on craigslist pretty soon, and am going to sell one of the other sets as well, but am not sure which ones to keep. I could probably press the 70s right now for at least 10 reps no problem, but doing any significant amount of works seems like they really bang me up. The 52s don’t bang me up at all, but the reps have to get absurdly high for me to get much benefit (I grabbed them in my room the other day while I was drunk and banged out 20 EASY presses for no reason haha, I am sure I could do a LOT while I am fresh and sober).

So either I am going to keep the 70s and focus more on strength, or keep the 52s to focus a little more on the cardio side of things. Obviously my main focus will still be on hitting the main lifts heavy as much as possible.

GPP work shouldn’t beat you up. We have some KBs. We use them for KB swings, pressing, extensions, rowing, etc. They’re just another tool to supplement the main lifts.

i think KBs like WildIronGym said are a great tool…i dont think they should be used in everyday training, but i think using them once a week is a great way to help hit/build muscles that normally arent hit through most lifts your doing throughout the week…i usually do my main lifting 3-4 days per week between Mon-Fri, and saturday i do KBs, Abs, and cardio, its been working out real well for me…

IronWarrior

Cool, thanks guys. I think I am going to keep my 52s.

Donnie Thompson likes them. So does Dan John. Even Wendler wrote in his ebook they are great for assistance. I don’t get all the KB haters. They aren’t the and-all-be-all like some people try to portray them, but they are an effective, versatile tool. Sure some people abuse them for butt-naked jumping jacks on bosu balls, but real KB training is minimalistic, effective and brutally hard. Come to think of it, I think it’s the “functional” guys that give the KB it’s bad reputation in some parts of the strength training community.

[quote]Enjoy The Pain wrote:
Donnie Thompson likes them. So does Dan John. Even Wendler wrote in his ebook they are great for assistance. I don’t get all the KB haters. They aren’t the and-all-be-all like some people try to portray them, but they are an effective, versatile tool. Sure some people abuse them for butt-naked jumping jacks on bosu balls, but real KB training is minimalistic, effective and brutally hard. Come to think of it, I think it’s the “functional” guys that give the KB it’s bad reputation in some parts of the strength training community.
[/quote]

I am a fan of using every tool in the tool box in order to get bigger,stronger, and faster. My problem with kettlebells is that they have always been a busted tool. Kettlebells were huge in the early 1900’s then their popularity diminished until relatively recently. Why did this happen? Because they didnt work then and they dont work now. All of the “functional” training assholes brought them back as part of their “underground” and “hardcore” training programs. People are stupid. They see something they think is bright shiney and new and some guy with blonde hair and a tight tank top tells them swinging these scrotum shaped dumbells around is the magic bullet for everything theyve ever wanted to accomplish physically.

There was actually a study last year that said kettlebell training was mostly done with momentum due to how the bells are shaped. Also, the study said there was much more benefit using regualr dumbells with the same exercises because you CANT swing them. I dont know where I found that study but its out there somewhere.

Anyway, my opinion, kettlebells for powerlifting=waste of time. Odds are, the time spent swinging those things around could be much better spent perfecting technique or doing real conditioning.

Anyway, my opinion, kettlebells for powerlifting=waste of time. Odds are, the time spent swinging those things around could be much better spent perfecting technique or doing real conditioning.
Thats why guys like Donnie Thompson, Dan John, Louie Simmons etc. use them. Chances are you have never given them a try.

You have an 88lb kettlebell and you’re selling it? Why?? :-o

Anyway, it’s too bad that I don’t live in Minnesota. I would buy it from you.

I think they’re okay for some stuff, but you really need to learn the proper way to swing them. I was lucky enough one year out Columbus to get a free seminar from the Pavel guy at Westside. If you learn the right way to do it they are helpful.

Using momentum primarily will decrease the benefits.

[quote]StormTheBeach wrote:

[quote]Enjoy The Pain wrote:
Donnie Thompson likes them. So does Dan John. Even Wendler wrote in his ebook they are great for assistance. I don’t get all the KB haters. They aren’t the and-all-be-all like some people try to portray them, but they are an effective, versatile tool. Sure some people abuse them for butt-naked jumping jacks on bosu balls, but real KB training is minimalistic, effective and brutally hard. Come to think of it, I think it’s the “functional” guys that give the KB it’s bad reputation in some parts of the strength training community.
[/quote]

I am a fan of using every tool in the tool box in order to get bigger,stronger, and faster. My problem with kettlebells is that they have always been a busted tool. Kettlebells were huge in the early 1900’s then their popularity diminished until relatively recently. Why did this happen? Because they didnt work then and they dont work now. All of the “functional” training assholes brought them back as part of their “underground” and “hardcore” training programs. People are stupid. They see something they think is bright shiney and new and some guy with blonde hair and a tight tank top tells them swinging these scrotum shaped dumbells around is the magic bullet for everything theyve ever wanted to accomplish physically.

There was actually a study last year that said kettlebell training was mostly done with momentum due to how the bells are shaped. Also, the study said there was much more benefit using regualr dumbells with the same exercises because you CANT swing them. I dont know where I found that study but its out there somewhere.

Anyway, my opinion, kettlebells for powerlifting=waste of time. Odds are, the time spent swinging those things around could be much better spent perfecting technique or doing real conditioning.
[/quote]

Very well put.

I agree 100%/10

The only thing I see them useful for for a PLer would be for restoration of the back with KB swings.

Ha I forgot I made this thread a while ago.

Have not sold any of the kettelbells yet, popped an ad up on craigslist a while ago but nobody responded. Maybe the price was too high. Can’t remember what I was asking at the time.

Anyways, I have actually been doing quite a bit of clean and jerks on saturdays with the 70 pounders. 20 sets of 3 is what I usually do, none of the sets are hard I just focus entirely on speed and power. My gym is only open M-F during the summer. Whether or not it is the most optimal thing to be doing, I feel like getting at least one lifting session in over the weekend is better than nothing.

Focusing on swinging them fairly far back between my legs then explosively swinging them forward and cleaning them seems like it has strengthened my lower back a good amount though, so they are not completely worthless.

[quote]maxbm wrote:
You have an 88lb kettlebell and you’re selling it? Why?? :-o

Anyway, it’s too bad that I don’t live in Minnesota. I would buy it from you.[/quote]

I hate unilateral work. Maybe if I had another one I would do some double kettlebell work. Just an OCD thing of mine haha.

I like them for conditioning. Especially this past winter when there was 3 fucking feet of snow on the ground. Also seem to be pretty good for explosive work.

I think they could work for strength if you had some of the really heavy ones, but they will cost you a small fortune. Rogue Fitness has them up to 203 lbs for like $500 each. I can’t imagine how much shipping would cost.

EDIT: I also like them for curls.

I use them for conditioning mostly.

If you get strong at Kettlebell(lifts) you get some carry over to Plifting but not enough to warrant the time involved.

Another tool is all.

Do you lift? What the hell does this have to do with Powerlifting?

BB

[quote]Big Bencher wrote:
Do you lift? What the hell does this have to do with Powerlifting?

BB[/quote]

HAHAHAHAHA. Awesome.

[quote]Big Bencher wrote:
Do you lift? What the hell does this have to do with Powerlifting?

BB[/quote]

Do you read posts? What the hell does it not have to do with powerlifting?

Kettle bells are Gay…

Well, to say Kettlebells are gay, just shows narrow minded-ness. I agree that the whole K-Bell movement, is a bit suspect, like Crossfit. I dont agree with it, but its their world, not mine. The K-Bell implement itself,is a hardcore, old school device, that guys like Arthur Saxon, Apollon, etc used. And most people here, couldn’t even carry their gym bag, if they had them back then. Dan John knows more, and does more than most on here, he knows the value. Open your mind and explore… Im not into jumping around, cardio bull crap, but it has its place, just not in my gym. I like K-Bells for breaking up the 30+ years ive been strength training (im 44) for pressing movements, etc. A great implement. Like many said on here (the smart folks) just a good tool, to add strength…