T Nation

Just Starting Out, Need Advice

[quote]Otep wrote:
So… This may go against what Colucci intended when he wrote the routine in the first place, but… You can totally do this every day.[/quote]

… and I shall strike down upon thee, with great vengeance and furious anger, those who attempt to poison and corrupt my program. And you will know my name is the Coach when I lay my workout upon you.

Just kidding, man.

Three days a week is my general starting place, adjusting up or down depending on goals and available time. While it is a lower volume workout, we need to remember that it’s going to be relatively high intensity on some of the exercises because the trainee will be lacking basic strength in some movements.

However, I wouldn’t be opposed to hitting the same workout four or five times a week, but chopping the reps in half every other workout. That way, the movements are still trained, overall stress is reduced, and recovery can be stimulated.

Quite right. Once the reps get relatively easy, you can totally move onto a more free weight-based routine and either drop this intro workout off your radar, or, ideally, keep it in once a week or so to still work the basic exercises.

Rasa, depending on the free weights you have available, I’d work on learning the fronts squat, sumo deadlift, and Romanian deadlift. Keep the lunges in (using weight when needed), and you’ve got everything you need for a solid lower body workout.

About the rest periods, two minutes is on the high side. I’d try to knock it down to a minute or so.

And about the push-ups, if necessary, you can stay on your toes and elevate your hands on a chair or step. As they get easier, lower the height you’re using, until your back on the floor, hands and toes only.

P.S. - Great work on the pull-ups. “Only 2” is about 3 more than many adult guys can do.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Otep wrote:
So… This may go against what Colucci intended when he wrote the routine in the first place, but… You can totally do this every day.

… and I shall strike down upon thee, with great vengeance and furious anger, those who attempt to poison and corrupt my program. And you will know my name is the Coach when I lay my workout upon you.

Just kidding, man.

Three days a week is my general starting place, adjusting up or down depending on goals and available time. While it is a lower volume workout, we need to remember that it’s going to be relatively high intensity on some of the exercises because the trainee will be lacking basic strength in some movements.

However, I wouldn’t be opposed to hitting the same workout four or five times a week, but chopping the reps in half every other workout. That way, the movements are still trained, overall stress is reduced, and recovery can be stimulated.

The other thing is that when you find that you can do the whole set (16 reps), it’s time to move onto weights. The bodyweight stuff is just a primer.
Quite right. Once the reps get relatively easy, you can totally move onto a more free weight-based routine and either drop this intro workout off your radar, or, ideally, keep it in once a week or so to still work the basic exercises.

Rasa, depending on the free weights you have available, I’d work on learning the fronts squat, sumo deadlift, and Romanian deadlift. Keep the lunges in (using weight when needed), and you’ve got everything you need for a solid lower body workout.

About the rest periods, two minutes is on the high side. I’d try to knock it down to a minute or so.

And about the push-ups, if necessary, you can stay on your toes and elevate your hands on a chair or step. As they get easier, lower the height you’re using, until your back on the floor, hands and toes only.

P.S. - Great work on the pull-ups. “Only 2” is about 3 more than many adult guys can do.[/quote]

I’m planning on sticking to three days a week. Im about to start doing squats now actually, and thank for for the advice on time in between. I wasn’t ever really sure how much time i was supposed to wait until the next set. Push ups are actually not that hard while I’m doing them, but afterwards I’m sore for a day or two. Or maybe I missed the point and that is why you told me to elevate. In that case, I’m dumb sometimes, sorry. lmao

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Otep wrote:
So… This may go against what Colucci intended when he wrote the routine in the first place, but… You can totally do this every day.

… and I shall strike down upon thee, with great vengeance and furious anger, those who attempt to poison and corrupt my program. And you will know my name is the Coach when I lay my workout upon you.

Just kidding, man.

Three days a week is my general starting place, adjusting up or down depending on goals and available time. While it is a lower volume workout, we need to remember that it’s going to be relatively high intensity on some of the exercises because the trainee will be lacking basic strength in some movements.

However, I wouldn’t be opposed to hitting the same workout four or five times a week, but chopping the reps in half every other workout. That way, the movements are still trained, overall stress is reduced, and recovery can be stimulated.

The other thing is that when you find that you can do the whole set (16 reps), it’s time to move onto weights. The bodyweight stuff is just a primer.
Quite right. Once the reps get relatively easy, you can totally move onto a more free weight-based routine and either drop this intro workout off your radar, or, ideally, keep it in once a week or so to still work the basic exercises.

Rasa, depending on the free weights you have available, I’d work on learning the fronts squat, sumo deadlift, and Romanian deadlift. Keep the lunges in (using weight when needed), and you’ve got everything you need for a solid lower body workout.

About the rest periods, two minutes is on the high side. I’d try to knock it down to a minute or so.

And about the push-ups, if necessary, you can stay on your toes and elevate your hands on a chair or step. As they get easier, lower the height you’re using, until your back on the floor, hands and toes only.

P.S. - Great work on the pull-ups. “Only 2” is about 3 more than many adult guys can do.[/quote]

Wow, this is what I should of asked about on your earlier post(rasa ignore this, oteres know what I mean). This is eloquent, and gets right to the point, and chock full of great advice. if you take any post in this thread to heart. Take the one quoted above. After you master some of these lifts, you should try stuff like cleans, and snatches. I’m in love with olympic lifting, and it often grows on people.

Mastering the front squat and deadlift are great starting point for just about any strength, or fitness goals. Another great lift to try is the military press. Another lift I love because It’s helped me get over shoulder problems (correlated to having weak shoulders) from benching without the right assesory work.

Goodluck!

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
There are too many motherfucking programs on this motherfucking website! [/quote]

Fixed that for you.