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Judo Conditioning Question

I just started taking Judo and man I didn’t realize how bad my cardio was until I started rolling around yesterday. I knew It wasn’t great, but I didn’t think it was that bad either. Anyone have any tips to increase my work capacity?

(Outside of HIIT running which I started just a few weeks ago)

[quote]haney1 wrote:
I just started taking Judo and man I didn’t realize how bad my cardio was until I started rolling around yesterday. I knew It wasn’t great, but I didn’t think it was that bad either. Anyone have any tips to increase my work capacity?

(Outside of HIIT running which I started just a few weeks ago)[/quote]

There’s a lot you can do for conditioning, but the best thing is to just keep going to class. The more classes you go to, the better your wind will be.

That being said, here’s some ideas of what to do outside of class:

Barbell complexes
Circuit training
Bodyweight circuit
MB circuit
Rope skipping
Sprints
Strongman medley (if you have the equipment)

jumping rope. hands down.

[quote]Djwlfpack wrote:
haney1 wrote:
I just started taking Judo and man I didn’t realize how bad my cardio was until I started rolling around yesterday. I knew It wasn’t great, but I didn’t think it was that bad either. Anyone have any tips to increase my work capacity?

(Outside of HIIT running which I started just a few weeks ago)

There’s a lot you can do for conditioning, but the best thing is to just keep going to class. The more classes you go to, the better your wind will be.

That being said, here’s some ideas of what to do outside of class:

Barbell complexes
Circuit training
Bodyweight circuit
MB circuit
Rope skipping
Sprints
Strongman medley (if you have the equipment)[/quote]

Thanks for the tips. I have done a few of the others in the past. Perhaps I will need to incorporate them again for a brief stint.

I am not familiar with the term mb circuit?

Sorry. MB = medicine ball.

There’s a bunch of different throws you can do with the MB, plus you can do things like push-ups, mountain climbers and ab work with it as well.

Going to class is a real big one, exercise specificity…
I had great cardio in BJJ then I started boxing/MMA and I was rediculously tired. A little adaptation…viola good cardio!
So don’t fall into that trap where you say, I’ll quit going to class, and come back when my cardio is better.

Here’s a great one if you have a partner…have the partner stand with his hands on his head. He should just have feet shoulder width apart and be straight up. Hop on his back like you’re doing a piggy back ride. Then go around his body in circles without letting your feet touch the ground. Great for his core strength and balance, great for your ability to find handles and your endurance to hold on. If you can do more than 5-8 circles, you’re doing well.

[quote]danew wrote:
Here’s a great one if you have a partner…have the partner stand with his hands on his head. He should just have feet shoulder width apart and be straight up. Hop on his back like you’re doing a piggy back ride. Then go around his body in circles without letting your feet touch the ground. Great for his core strength and balance, great for your ability to find handles and your endurance to hold on. If you can do more than 5-8 circles, you’re doing well.[/quote]

Isn’t that called a revolution? I remember seeing it on one of the tuf seasons.

[quote]No-Gi wrote:
Going to class is a real big one, exercise specificity…
I had great cardio in BJJ then I started boxing/MMA and I was rediculously tired. A little adaptation…viola good cardio!
So don’t fall into that trap where you say, I’ll quit going to class, and come back when my cardio is better.[/quote]

Yeah, I am not too worried about that being my mind set. I know I will improve as I go. It is always the case when I start a new Martial art. I was just really surprised how out it I felt.

[quote]Djwlfpack wrote:
Sorry. MB = medicine ball.

There’s a bunch of different throws you can do with the MB, plus you can do things like push-ups, mountain climbers and ab work with it as well.[/quote]

Ah! I normally only use my “mb” for ply training. Perhaps I will need to look into other uses for it…

to increase your work capacity?

sled dragging.

energy systems work?

xen’s 5x5x5:

throw a gi over a pullup bar.

-5 gi pullups
-5 power cleans
-5 presses
-5 bent rows

repeat 5x, rest one minute.

Judo is fun,

Did it for 8 years. I wrestled too, and found the conditioning
for HS and college wrestling far more comprehensive and intense.

we did allot of Judo specific things, sort of what you might find in a Judo/BJJ warm up, running, skipping, tumbling…
Ukemi (falling)
crawls, forearm pulls, etc.

But what we really did is burpees.
Lots and lots of burpees.and Medicine ball slams.

I would check out the tabata protocol
20 seconds work, 10 seconds rest x8
4 minutes of hell.
do it with jumprope, pushups, BW squats, burpees etc.

I would even say a rowing machine is really underated.

kmc

[quote]haney1 wrote:
danew wrote:
Here’s a great one if you have a partner…have the partner stand with his hands on his head. He should just have feet shoulder width apart and be straight up. Hop on his back like you’re doing a piggy back ride. Then go around his body in circles without letting your feet touch the ground. Great for his core strength and balance, great for your ability to find handles and your endurance to hold on. If you can do more than 5-8 circles, you’re doing well.

Isn’t that called a revolution? I remember seeing it on one of the tuf seasons.[/quote]

Yea it’s a great exercise though. Wonderful for both partners. Also gi pull-ups are great to get your grip toughened.

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
to increase your work capacity?

sled dragging.

energy systems work?

xen’s 5x5x5:

throw a gi over a pullup bar.

-5 gi pullups
-5 power cleans
-5 presses
-5 bent rows

repeat 5x, rest one minute.[/quote]
I think I will give this a try. I will add it in twice a week to my current work out program.

[quote]kmcnyc wrote:
Judo is fun,

Did it for 8 years. I wrestled too, and found the conditioning
for HS and college wrestling far more comprehensive and intense.

we did allot of Judo specific things, sort of what you might find in a Judo/BJJ warm up, running, skipping, tumbling…
Ukemi (falling)
crawls, forearm pulls, etc.

But what we really did is burpees.
Lots and lots of burpees.and Medicine ball slams.

I would check out the tabata protocol
20 seconds work, 10 seconds rest x8
4 minutes of hell.
do it with jumprope, pushups, BW squats, burpees etc.

I would even say a rowing machine is really underated.

kmc

[/quote]

I have done the tabata method with body weight squats, and it did suck. I am curious though how burpees would go…

[quote]danew wrote:
haney1 wrote:
danew wrote:
Here’s a great one if you have a partner…have the partner stand with his hands on his head. He should just have feet shoulder width apart and be straight up. Hop on his back like you’re doing a piggy back ride. Then go around his body in circles without letting your feet touch the ground. Great for his core strength and balance, great for your ability to find handles and your endurance to hold on. If you can do more than 5-8 circles, you’re doing well.

Isn’t that called a revolution? I remember seeing it on one of the tuf seasons.

Yea it’s a great exercise though. Wonderful for both partners. Also gi pull-ups are great to get your grip toughened.[/quote]

It def. looks tough.

Burpees are great.

However, as someone mentioned, by far the best method is to just go to class consistently. The best way increase your work capacity for grappling is… grappling. I you can do Judo 4 or 5 times a week, then do it and don’t worry about outside conditioning. In general, any time spent doing extra conditioning would be far better spent doing Judo, for improvement in both technique and stamina. I would only worry about doing extra conditioning is if you are preparing for a competition or by scheduling limitations can only train less then 3 times a week.

[quote]haney1 wrote:
I just started taking Judo and man I didn’t realize how bad my cardio was until I started rolling around yesterday. I knew It wasn’t great, but I didn’t think it was that bad either. Anyone have any tips to increase my work capacity?

(Outside of HIIT running which I started just a few weeks ago)[/quote]

Other than LOTS of randori, what has worked very well for me is hill sprints followed by chinups. I’ll run as fast as I can up a steep hill, about 200m, then at the top I’ll TRY to do 20 chinups but I can get about 10-12 before I cannot breathe at all. You will feel like you are drowning if you do it right. Walk slowly down the hill, and repeat, 3 sets to start, work up to 5 sets.

I learned this workout from my coach, a former Pan-Am Gold medalist and National team coach, so it’s pretty good I figure. I know I hate it so it must be worth doing, lol…

JR

[quote]anoddparadigm wrote:
Burpees are great.

However, as someone mentioned, by far the best method is to just go to class consistently. The best way increase your work capacity for grappling is… grappling. I you can do Judo 4 or 5 times a week, then do it and don’t worry about outside conditioning. In general, any time spent doing extra conditioning would be far better spent doing Judo, for improvement in both technique and stamina. I would only worry about doing extra conditioning is if you are preparing for a competition or by scheduling limitations can only train less then 3 times a week.[/quote]

I can only make two of the three classes during the week. They are all 1.5 hours. I know in a month this will not be an issue, but I want to increase my performance as quickly as possible that way when I am doing mat work it is not as much of a struggle. I really look forward to class right now. I just wish I didn’t suck so bad at it.

[quote]Jelly Roll wrote:
haney1 wrote:
I just started taking Judo and man I didn’t realize how bad my cardio was until I started rolling around yesterday. I knew It wasn’t great, but I didn’t think it was that bad either. Anyone have any tips to increase my work capacity?

(Outside of HIIT running which I started just a few weeks ago)

Other than LOTS of randori, what has worked very well for me is hill sprints followed by chinups. I’ll run as fast as I can up a steep hill, about 200m, then at the top I’ll TRY to do 20 chinups but I can get about 10-12 before I cannot breathe at all. You will feel like you are drowning if you do it right. Walk slowly down the hill, and repeat, 3 sets to start, work up to 5 sets.

I learned this workout from my coach, a former Pan-Am Gold medalist and National team coach, so it’s pretty good I figure. I know I hate it so it must be worth doing, lol…

JR [/quote]

yeah the randori thing is what killed me my first class. there is one hill by my house, but no place for chinups. so this might not be an easy option for me.

With all the suggestion I have got so far I really could do a different workout every day…