T Nation

Journal Articles W/O Membership?


#1

Seems like there's some pretty serious students of T and hypertrophy here, so I want to ask a question: how can I (with going $10,000 in debt) look at journal articles. Example: there was a great abstract in the Journal of Applied Physiology dealing with T and various weight protocols. But when I tried to pull up the article, it of course said I needed a $700+ membership!

Is there any way around this for the little guy, i.e. the interested layman? Is there one central repository somewhere so you only have to join once? Or can you get the full articles in libraries? I'd rather not go to a library and would prefer a web-based solution, but any tips/guidance would be much appreciated.

Thx.


#2

A library would obviously be a solution, although it would probably need to be a college library. You may be able to go in and print stuff off though. Also, if you know someone in college, sometimes off campus students can get a password to log into databases through the school from a remote location.

NSCA does have their journals online for free.

Dan


#3

Not all college libraries even have access to all of the journals. Because there are so many, an institution must be selective as to which journal they are going to purchase subscriptions to.

My advice is to call around first, its not as easy as it really should be.


#4

NSCA does NOT have free journals. You need a password and member ID.


#5

Agreed.

Most librarys allow public access to their catalog online, too, so you can look there before you drive around.

-Dan


#6

Try:

www.jssm.org/


#7

This is exactly what I've found. There's really only major university in town right now and they said they'll have a mixture.

What do you mean by "call around first"? Call around where?


#8

Thx! It didn't have many journals on T though unless I'm really missing something...


#9

I called one city library and they said that you had to go to the university science library. (And I live in a large metro area...)


#10

What's medline guys? Is that a silver bullet? (It doesn't look like it...)


#11

I didn't see a search engine for nsca? I don't want to join unless they have quite a few articles on T-related subjects, hypertrophy, etc.

www.nsca-lift.org


#12

You could try pubmed. Its free to join (i think) and they give the links for articles. Unfortunately the link usually takes you to a site where you need to pay to get the full text. Once in a while you can find a free full text article though.

If you get the citation, you might be able to go to a college library and find the articles via medline search then print from there.


#13

Try searching Google scholar. A lot of the time you won't be able to access articles without a subscription but sometimes you will luck out and be able to link directly to an article.

http://scholar.google.com/


#14

Thx guys. I'll try the google sometime.

Actually, after narrowing it down to the five or so "heavy hitter" journals that I needed, I called the university library and asked point blank if they carried those specific ones and in every case they said 'yes' - woo hoo!

Thx for the help - I think I'm in business...


#15

And btw I found that one of the large city libraries lets you access some of these journals from home!


#16

As a final year medical student, I've spent most of my life searching through journals. Usually institutions like universities have subscriptions to most of the major journals. Inevitably though, the one artilce that you find that seems to be the answer to all of your essay-writing troubles comes from a journal that you need to pay for.

Here's a little tip that has worked for me - the authors usually leave correspondence email addresses. Email them and they usually email you their article for free. This is obviously only useful if you want to look at a specific article and not just search and browse a journal.


#17

Congrats on getting near the end of med school and thx for the tip!

Do you have to tell them why you want to look at the article, i.e. if I tell them I'm an interested layman will that be good enough? Or do I even need to say that much?