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Job Outlook for Recent Graduates

I’m even looking at the Army. I’ve already talked to a recruiter in the field. He said I’d be ‘highly competitive’ since I have a masters in a hard science as far as making it as an environmental science officer. Actually talked to me over the phone for over 40 minutes. It sounds really interesting, but they won’t recruit until September-October and I wouldn’t be on the payroll until January if I made it.

[quote]spar4tee wrote:
I’ve always wondered whether it would be more marketable for me to pursue a MS or another BS[/quote]

You’re interested in Astro right? If you go through with a PhD you have good credential for getting finance work. They want people who know how to deal with big data.

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]spar4tee wrote:
I’ve always wondered whether it would be more marketable for me to pursue a MS or another BS[/quote]

You’re interested in Astro right? If you go through with a PhD you have good credential for getting finance work. They want people who know how to deal with big data. [/quote]
I’m doing mechanical engineering now. Electrical engineering, chemical engineering, aerospace engineering, nuclear physics, and astrophysics are the fields that I’d consider if I were to seek a second BS.

[quote]spar4tee wrote:

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]spar4tee wrote:
I’ve always wondered whether it would be more marketable for me to pursue a MS or another BS[/quote]

You’re interested in Astro right? If you go through with a PhD you have good credential for getting finance work. They want people who know how to deal with big data. [/quote]
I’m doing mechanical engineering now. Electrical engineering, chemical engineering, aerospace engineering, nuclear physics, and astrophysics are the fields that I’d consider if I were to seek a second BS.[/quote]

What about computer engineering?

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]spar4tee wrote:

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]spar4tee wrote:
I’ve always wondered whether it would be more marketable for me to pursue a MS or another BS[/quote]

You’re interested in Astro right? If you go through with a PhD you have good credential for getting finance work. They want people who know how to deal with big data. [/quote]
I’m doing mechanical engineering now. Electrical engineering, chemical engineering, aerospace engineering, nuclear physics, and astrophysics are the fields that I’d consider if I were to seek a second BS.[/quote]

What about computer engineering? [/quote]
Not really my cup of tea

Some good information here.

To reiterate on a point that some posters have made, you really need to tailor each application to each position. It’s not a pure numbers game - I think your odds of getting a position would be better with 20 tailored applications vs. 200 generic ones.

What do I mean by “tailored application”? Spend time researching the company. Make a cover letter and include specific references as to why you think you’d be a good fit (start mentioning these near the beginning, you want to hook them in the first paragraph). Same goes for your resume - put the actual name of the open position at the top of it. Emphasize the skills you have that you feel match what they are looking for. You’re young - keep it at one page - they don’t care about your paper route at age 14, nor the fact that you like the outdoors. Don’t include any references, just a line in a small font that says “references available upon request”.

Try and follow-up a couple weeks after you submit it. Be mindful if the ad says “no phone calls please”, that’s a polite way of saying “call us and you’re out of the running”. Email is fine. The fact that you even followed up will make you stand out amongst the other applicants.

Just get that first interview - that will give you the opportunity to wow the shit out of them

Agreed with above. Any cover letter should say what you can bring to them. Never say anything about why YOU would like to work for them, it isnt about YOU.

I feel your pain, I graduated in the spring of 09 with a BS in Econ and a BS in Geology. Took me 6 months to get a shitty job even, and almost a year to get something halfways decent. Thats something I dont want to go through again.

[quote]spar4tee wrote:

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]spar4tee wrote:
I’ve always wondered whether it would be more marketable for me to pursue a MS or another BS[/quote]

You’re interested in Astro right? If you go through with a PhD you have good credential for getting finance work. They want people who know how to deal with big data. [/quote]
I’m doing mechanical engineering now. Electrical engineering, chemical engineering, aerospace engineering, nuclear physics, and astrophysics are the fields that I’d consider if I were to seek a second BS.[/quote]

Mechanical with electrical experience is much sought after in the machine build trades. Especially if you can program controllers and such.

I see hundreds of resumes and run dozens of job competitions, although I’m in a vastly different field than yourself, I’m sure this is true pretty much everywhere, so here goes:

  1. Tailor your resume for the job you’re applying for. I can’t tell you how many resumes I get that are geared towards finance, or agriculture (as an example) and I’m in health. Right away, it tells me you really don’t care and are just mass-spamming your resume out.

  2. EVERYONE has a BA/BSc now - it’s the bare minimum. Even the military is looking for college/university graduates. If you don’t have a degree, I strongly recommend you go back and get one. Don’t tell me you can’t, for I went back and got mine while working a full time job, being married and being a dad. I took me 10 years of hell, but I have it, so don’t make an excuse for yourself.

  3. Don’t rely on those job sites like others have said. The exception that someone mentioned is Linkedin. It’s more for “professionals” and reputable organizations will post jobs through there. I strongly suggest you join these organizations’ “groups” on Linkedin, but remember, Linkedin is not Facebook!

  4. Network - I know it’s been said above, but network like crazy. If there’s a certain field you’re interested in working, try to find out what conferences and trade shows are out there in your area and attend them. I just attended a 3-day conference where I live and was headhunted by a consulting group (funny thing, I nearly worked for them a decade ago). I’m still thinking about the offer right now!

Also - use your own personal networks. Your friends, their parents and so on. I’m sure someone knows someone in the field you’re interested in. Give them a call and see if they can arrange for you to meet their friend/family member and find out more about working in that field and the company they work for. You never know, but it could open the door for you.

  1. Never think that just because you have a degree (BA/BSc/MA/PhD) that you know shit - you don’t. You have a piece of paper that says you know how to think a certain way. I can’t tell you how many 20 year olds come in thinking they should be a director or VP of something. I also can’t tell you how many people I’ve hired with a MA or PhD that can’t tie their shoes to save their life.

  2. Study for your interview - Spend some time and research the company. Find out what it does, what it’s challenges are, who it’s competitors are, etc. You can then talk about this in your interview and talk about how you can help the company achieve or work through these issues, etc. Ideally try to find someone on the “inside” (and yes, start with the receptionist if you have to) to find out what the culture is like and what it’s like working there. Maybe they can plug you in to someone in one of the departments that’s open to sitting down with you and talking about the company, the work, etc. It’s like a research project - you wouldn’t just sit down and start writing shit without spending the time and doing some research.

Also - if you research the companies that you might want to work for AND if you can sit down with someone who works there, they might be able to get you some names of people in the organization. E-mail these people with a “Hi Bob, I was talking with Julie the other day and she recommended that I talk to you directly about some possible upcoming positions within your organization…” I can tell you right now, if someone I know and trust recommends someone to talk to me about a job, I’m going to meet with them even if I don’t have a job YET. If they seem like a good fit and I like their style, I’m going to hang onto their resume and give them a call when something opens up.

  1. If you’ve done #6 above, then you know what the standard dresscode (formal or informal) of the organization and can dress appropriately for your interview. You wouldn’t show up wearing shorts and sandals to an interview for a corporate job and you won’t show up with a suit and tie (well maybe) for a physiotherapist interview.

If you are willing to do some work, there is no reason you should not have a blog - preferably www.yourfullname.com. The topic should be whatever field you want to get a job in.

Having a master’s degree gives you some sort of authority on the topic, even though you do not have work experience. You could talk about the impact of weather on drilling ops, the impact of drilling ops on the environment - I don’t really know exactly what your field does, but you get the idea.

There’s plenty of “free” content out there if you want to hustle. What I mean by this is that you could subscribe to the top journals in your field, read the new studies, then translate the best ones into layman’s speak (obviously within reason - you can’t copy the whole thing), but then more importantly, discuss the practical applications of this research and then how it might change your field.

Additionally, interview leading scientists and experts in the field. Ask them what their research consists of, where they think the field is going, and what new tech or laws or whatever is likely to mix things up. People in such obscure fields typically do not get much attention even if they are very bright or innovative, and everyone likes being recognized for their hard work. Many people will agree to be interviewed. Not only do you get a great interview for your website, but you’ve suddenly made a connection to a top peer in your field.

Now, here is the important part - create a LinkedIn page. Everyone you interact with on your blog should be your friend if they have a profile. Place your URL front and center so that prospective employers can see. Typically your average oil rig owner is not LinkedIn and high tech stuff, but I’ll tell you who is - headhunters. If they see a profile with a nice blog relevant on the topic as well as friends with other employed professionals in that same field, guess who’s going to be a top recruit?

Additionally, place your URL on your resume and cover letter. You can even mention in your cover letter that you have this website all about your field and that you aren’t just some fresh college grad looking for a job but are actually passionate about your field and on top of the latest advances.

Thanks for all the tips and help guys. I’m totally not used to being in a position like the one I’m currently in I’m itching to get out of it.

challer1: Do you have links on how to get a blog started or anything like that?

Got your CV and sent it to Jacobs engineering, they have a environmental division in
Denver, the HR guy is sending it to them.

I have some other contacts when I get to office tomorrow I will send it on.

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
Got your CV and sent it to Jacobs engineering, they have a environmental division in
Denver, the HR guy is sending it to them.

I have some other contacts when I get to office tomorrow I will send it on. [/quote]
Good Guy Derek

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
Got your CV and sent it to Jacobs engineering, they have a environmental division in
Denver, the HR guy is sending it to them.

I have some other contacts when I get to office tomorrow I will send it on. [/quote]

I is jelly.

What skills do you have?

ESA?

NEPA?

GIS/CAD?

Any oil and gas?

Houston is full of environmental science jobs and Austin has quite a few.

In general though. The job market fucking sucks.

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
Got your CV and sent it to Jacobs engineering, they have a environmental division in
Denver, the HR guy is sending it to them.

I have some other contacts when I get to office tomorrow I will send it on. [/quote]

Thank you so much even if nothing comes out of this. Again, thanks.

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
Got your CV and sent it to Jacobs engineering, they have a environmental division in
Denver, the HR guy is sending it to them.

I have some other contacts when I get to office tomorrow I will send it on. [/quote]

Thank you so much even if nothing comes out of this. Again, thanks. [/quote]

No problem

[quote]Da Man reloaded wrote:

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:
About 6 months ago, I earned my Masters in Environmental Science and still can’t find a job. Not even lab or field technician. Only three interviews.

How are the rest of you recent grads doing on this front and if you’re did well how’d you do it?[/quote]

did you take any engineering classes? maybe CAD classes? I doubt it, but it is worth asking. Engineers are in such demand right now it isnt funny. I took my resume off of all the sites years ago and I still get calls from companies that were keeping it.

My company is looking for 10 more, one of our current clients is looking for 40.

If you have anything that could relate to engineering or even just design/drafting I would try to work with that. Perhaps a CAD class at the local community college?

I know your passion is not engineering, and I am sorry for that. I also know that engineers have half the unemployment of the rest of the population.

you may have to grind along with a nightmare job until things look up. I sincerely hope not, but that may be the unfortunate reality.[/quote]

Where the heck were all these jobs a year ago?? i have a mech engineering degree and couldnt find anything for 9months or so and finally ended in QA at an automotive company, which is something i don’t really want to end up doing.

[quote]critietaeta wrote:

[quote]Da Man reloaded wrote:

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:
About 6 months ago, I earned my Masters in Environmental Science and still can’t find a job. Not even lab or field technician. Only three interviews.

How are the rest of you recent grads doing on this front and if you’re did well how’d you do it?[/quote]

did you take any engineering classes? maybe CAD classes? I doubt it, but it is worth asking. Engineers are in such demand right now it isnt funny. I took my resume off of all the sites years ago and I still get calls from companies that were keeping it.

My company is looking for 10 more, one of our current clients is looking for 40.

If you have anything that could relate to engineering or even just design/drafting I would try to work with that. Perhaps a CAD class at the local community college?

I know your passion is not engineering, and I am sorry for that. I also know that engineers have half the unemployment of the rest of the population.

you may have to grind along with a nightmare job until things look up. I sincerely hope not, but that may be the unfortunate reality.[/quote]

Where the heck were all these jobs a year ago?? i have a mech engineering degree and couldnt find anything for 9months or so and finally ended in QA at an automotive company, which is something i don’t really want to end up doing.
[/quote]
Get out of Jersey and come to the South

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:
Thanks for all the tips and help guys. I’m totally not used to being in a position like the one I’m currently in I’m itching to get out of it.

challer1: Do you have links on how to get a blog started or anything like that?[/quote]

There are a ton of free resources out there… google “how to start a wordpress blog” or something similar. You can register a domain at namecheap.com for $10 and then get quality hosting at hostgator.com for like $8/month. There are free youtube tutorials for setting everything up.

Even if you do get a job, this is still something I would recommend doing. Building up a brand through a blog can set you up for another job if you ever get laid off and if its good/popular you might even get quality unsolicited job offers. At a bare minimum, you can use it as a springboard to do some consulting on the side for some extra $$.