Jiu Jitsu: Submission Question

I’ve got a head, and an arm, and I’m in ‘north/south’ … NOW what do I do?

This is a common position for me to get in class, and I feel I could finish a good amount of the time if I just knew what to do. I’ve tried a darce, and arm triangle… not workin for me. Any other ideas? Or suggestions on what one might be doing wrong on such submissions?

OK, I am picturing this as you are using your right arm to trap his left arm and head. So his trapped arm is between you. You create the pressure using your head and neck and the posture from your feet. You should be able to finish the choke from there. It is very hard to coach that pressure over the internet though so here are some other options.

His trapped arm is right there for you and isolated so you can switch your right hand to gripping the wrist and set up a classic figure four kimura or switch to the armbar depending how he reacts.

Other option is to just walk your feet round clockwise, keeping the pressure on his arm across his neck. As you pass perpendicular to him slide your left arm across his neck and under the head setting up a classic arm triangle. If at any time he tries to punch through and go to his knees he will be giving you the arm for an armbar.

*sorry if this is confusing the way it is written, much easier to show than type.

The guillotine/ Monson Choke from north/south should work. There are a lot of permutations, but I really like the way Monson positions his hands, it make a world of difference.

I kinda just assumed you meant no gi, if you’re in the gi I really like the bread cutter chokes. You don’t finish in north/south, but I like to set it up from there.

So you are encircling the head and arm?.

Overhook the arm into an arm bar. Simple. Devastating.

I hate being on the bottom in that position but love it when you’re there and have top control. My two favorite subs to go for from there are either a kimura or armbar. If you have control of an arm in north south you use your legs and bodyweight to hold someone while you crank his arm like you would a kimura except the arm will be facing in front of your opponent. So you will be attempting to twist his arm towards his legs rather than behind him. This is a nice one cause if you dont get it you probably wont lose position. If you have good control of an arm and you can perform a pretty tight armbar, you can pivot 90 degrees towards that side and fall into an easy armbar also.

[quote]Beershoes wrote:
I’ve got a head, and an arm, and I’m in ‘north/south’ … NOW what do I do?

This is a common position for me to get in class, and I feel I could finish a good amount of the time if I just knew what to do. I’ve tried a darce, and arm triangle… not workin for me. Any other ideas? Or suggestions on what one might be doing wrong on such submissions?[/quote]

your D’Arce set up must be wrong

I land this more than the other

an old favorite

yes Ari is a better instructor than fighter (before it even comes up)

North-south is my favorite position right now, so I’ll give you my 2 cents.

Personally I find two attacks that are fairly high percentage from this position:

  1. Armbar: isolate the trapped arm- figure-four is good for this since it provides a decent level of control and you can turn it into a kimura as well. From here, put your leg over the head, leg curl, and position yourself for the armbar. I’ll leave out the details of the armbar since you’re probably familiar with the key concepts.

  2. Kimura: This is tricky. The key is to minimize turning space. The most secure position is to, essentially, put your guy in a mounted inverted triangle. Say you’re attacking the left side, put your right leg under the right armpit. It helps if you manage to roll him to the right side, away from the direction of crank. Squeeze your legs to prevent him from rolling, and finish the submission.
    Keep in mind the right arm need not be trapped by your legs for success, but it does help. The kimura will work provided three things, A) your legs aren’t too close to his head, B) you position him on his side, C) you squeeze your legs and minimize space.
    Watch the GSP-Hardy fight. The reason GSP couldn’t get that Kimura was because he had his left leg stretched out to help him crank more, intuitive but counter-productive.

If you roll your opponent to the side, you can also take mount.

When sparring I like to think of side-control and N-S as the same position. There are A LOT of different ways to catch those two submissions in the transitions.

Note that to prevent your opponent from getting to his knees (in which case Game Over), you need to isolate an arm. If you do not have an arm, control his hips with your shoulders or head (if you’re up for it), and wait for that arm.

The explanation above are the best I can do with text, seek the guidance of your instructor and apply what you learn in sparring

great stuff guys. thanks!

im gonna try to do some of this next practice. i would personally lock the arm into the side and move into side control, set up the armbar trapping the arm moving to S-mount and going for it, or possibly something like a reverse ezekiel choke although it would be pretty easy to roll out of. im a white belt w/ 4 stripes and im 14 so probably dont take this too seriously, but you might be able to tweak it a bit during unresisted practice, hope i helped!

ANACONDA sounds perfect

North South is an option but not always a very high percentage one.
It works well for Jeff Monson because he has lats the size of a pterodactyl.

From North South your best bet for a finish is the Kimura. Depending on your opponent’s level this will also open up the possibility of mount.

In the Gi I usually use the fact that I’m covering my opponent’s face to pass his lapel under his armpit, up to his neck, and begin setting up a baseball bat choke (which begins in side control and ends back in North South).

I do use the Monson choke a lot and seeing I only weigh about 180 pounds that should not be the biggest problem to finish, it does take some practice and drilling to execute it correctly but I experience it as an effective choke that is easy to employ…