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JB's KM Log

9 March â?? Krav Maga 90 mins

General warm up on pads 20 mins
A) Jab/hook
B) Jab/hook; weave; right hammer
C) As above plus kick defence; right hammer

Lower body conditioning on pads:
A) Roundhouse kicks x 60 each leg
B) Kicks to groin x 60 each leg

Knife defences against hold ups (rotate with partner):
Attacker in front, knife to throat;
Attacker in front, knife across throat
Attacker at side, knife to ribs
Attacker from behind, knife to throat
Attacker in front threatening Oriental stab to abdomen
Attacker in front blade pressed on abdomen

Finisher: sparring x 5 mins
This was a mini-mash up with 4 of us going at each other; any punch and kick permitted. The idea was to effect 1-2 strikes and move on to someone else. This took me right out of my comfort zone and I struggled to launch too many coherent blows, although I did land a few decent jabs and left front Thai kicks. One guy hit me to the head with a big right leg roundhouse, which I didnâ??t see coming (should only happen in Van Damm movies!). This is what KM is all about.

[quote]JamesBrawn007 wrote:
9 March â?? Krav Maga 90 mins

General warm up on pads 20 mins
A) Jab/hook
B) Jab/hook; weave; right hammer
C) As above plus kick defence; right hammer

Lower body conditioning on pads:
A) Roundhouse kicks x 60 each leg
B) Kicks to groin x 60 each leg

Knife defences against hold ups (rotate with partner):
Attacker in front, knife to throat;
Attacker in front, knife across throat
Attacker at side, knife to ribs
Attacker from behind, knife to throat
Attacker in front threatening Oriental stab to abdomen
Attacker in front blade pressed on abdomen

Finisher: sparring x 5 mins
This was a mini-mash up with 4 of us going at each other; any punch and kick permitted. The idea was to effect 1-2 strikes and move on to someone else. This took me right out of my comfort zone and I struggled to launch too many coherent blows, although I did land a few decent jabs and left front Thai kicks. One guy hit me to the head with a big right leg roundhouse, which I didnâ??t see coming (should only happen in Van Damm movies!). This is what KM is all about.
[/quote]
Like your finisher good stuff.

[quote]JamesBrawn007 wrote:
9 March â?? Krav Maga 90 mins

General warm up on pads 20 mins
A) Jab/hook
B) Jab/hook; weave; right hammer
C) As above plus kick defence; right hammer

Lower body conditioning on pads:
A) Roundhouse kicks x 60 each leg
B) Kicks to groin x 60 each leg

Knife defences against hold ups (rotate with partner):
Attacker in front, knife to throat;
Attacker in front, knife across throat
Attacker at side, knife to ribs
Attacker from behind, knife to throat
Attacker in front threatening Oriental stab to abdomen
Attacker in front blade pressed on abdomen

Finisher: sparring x 5 mins
This was a mini-mash up with 4 of us going at each other; any punch and kick permitted. The idea was to effect 1-2 strikes and move on to someone else. This took me right out of my comfort zone and I struggled to launch too many coherent blows, although I did land a few decent jabs and left front Thai kicks. One guy hit me to the head with a big right leg roundhouse, which I didnâ??t see coming (should only happen in Van Damm movies!). This is what KM is all about.
[/quote]

That’s a fun drill, we do those from time to time. With multiple attacker/mele scenarios there is just too much sensory information coming in which makes the Time/Distance Variable go to hell. As a result you just can’t block incoming strikes the same way you can with one on one situations. You’ve got to fight from more of a “shield/shell” guard position and just hit anything that comes into range. Also trying to “stack/line up” your opponents so you only have to deal with one at a time or “spread” them should you get caught in a corner or surrounded are important strategies against multiples.

Tues 10 March - Home Training 16 mins

A1) Wide ring pull-up 5 x 5
A2) Negative G/H raise 5 x 5
A3) Feet on SB push up 5 x 10
x 3 circuits; 1 min rest between. Will up pull ups to 6 reps next time.

B1) Feet inclined ring row 2 x 10
B2) Ring dips 2 x 6

Wed 11 March

Did not train.

New job this week has meant earlier rises and, unfortunately due to other commitments, late bed times. Obviously this is not conducive to productive training. I aim to sort this out as I get used to the new routine.

Also, I previously did hot yoga on Wednesday nights. However, this class has been cancelled, which is a pity as I really felt it helped with my lower back condition.

Thurs 12 March - Krav Maga 90 mins

Worked on grading, which is the last weekend of the month. All basic stuff based on a series of strikes: palm, hammer and elbow, from the semi-passive position. This is more challenging than it sounds as it feels quite alien to anyone from a fighting, e.g. boxing background, where you are in a more efficient stance. Obviously the idea behind the semi-passive stance is effecting a strike with an opponent unsuspecting. It also takes practice getting power on the strikes when in this ‘flat’ position.

Since it wasn’t too physically taxing, I did 8 mins on the heavy bags afterwards. General boxing and front Thai kicks with as little rest as possible throughout. Stopped the session when sweat was blinding me.

Fri 13 March - Home Training - 18 mins

A1) Renegade row 4 x 8
A2) Bulgarian split squat 4 x 8 (leg suspended in ring while KB held in opposite hand)
A3) Push up jacknife 4 x 10
Using pair of 20kg KBs. 1 min between circuits

B) Squat push press 3 x 5
Using the same KBs. 30 sec rest intervals

C1) Ring row (body at 45 degrees) 2 x 10
C2) Narrow ring dips 2 x 6
1 min between circuits

D) L sit in rings x 30 sec hold

Sat 14 March - Krav Maga - 90 mins

Mainly technique work for the grading on 28 March. Concentrated on strikes from the semi-passive stance, namely: palm strikes; elbows to front, side and rear; hammers to front vertical, downward and rear vertical.

Slightly surprisingly, I have weighed in at 175 lbs. This is 7 lbs more than expected. I have not noticed any substantial fat gain so I am optimistic I have gained a few extra pounds of lean mass. This has been achieved through consistent, i.e. high frequency training, with some additional carbs, although my diet is still modest when it comes to carbs. I eat few but supplement with more as via my intra-workout carbs. This means somethings like this:

Weights:
20-25g of hydro whey (I have hydro casein when the whey runs out)
40g cyclic dextrin
3-5g leucine
3-5g creatine

Conditioning/Krav Maga

10g BCAA (contains beta alanine; citruline malate; electrolytes)
3-5g extra leucine
3-5g creatine
10g palatinose
40g waxy maize

Sun 15 March - Home Training - 16 mins

I did some general bag work, low sledge pushing and shadow work. Unfortunately, I think I tweaked the main tendon in my right shoulder the previous day and it flared up towards the end of the session.

I have suffered from this tendon pinch in the past (in both shoulders). It usually means 1-3 weeks out from any serious upper body training. This isn’t as bad this time but I know from experience it will deteriorate if I can’t address it. I took NSAIDs and have scheduled an appointment to see my ART practitioner Monday at 5pm. This has happened at a crap time (WHEN DOES IT EVER HAPPEN AT A GOOD ONE?) as I’m training toward a Krav Maga grading at the end of the month. That’s on hold as things stand. I’m just hoping a single ART session will create some space to allow the swelling to subside and heal.

That sucks! I hate being injured.

If this is a recurring injury though and not the result of a freak acute accident/incident, then I would seriously suggest taking a step back and trying to figure out what the cause might be (muscular imbalance, underdeveloped/conditioned connective tissues, inactive muscle group(s), inappropriate exercise selection, postural dysfunctions/compensations, etc…), unless you want it to continue recurring (and potentially leading to a serious injury.

For instance I noticed you do ring support work (push-ups and dip variations). Let me first state that rings are outstanding tools for building shoulder stability, strength through the core and upper limbs, balance, mobility, and the skills look awesome and are fun too IF you have properly prepared yourself for the demands they place on the body. The problem is that most of us adults have lost the necessary mobility, strength to weight ratio, and connective tissue to muscular strength ratio/balance that we had as children (when most gymnasts begin training on them) and this are not physically prepared to perform ring support strength work (even push-ups). Trying to do so in the absence of proper preparation places us at a much higher risk of injury (and also generally prohibits us from ever being able to perform much besides sloppy partial ROM dips, sloppy push-ups, and sloppy muscle-ups, hence why nobody in the Crossfit world or general fitness world is doing any impressive ring strength elements despite the fact that rings have been on the market and part of the CrossFit scene since the early 2,000’s).

My honest suggestion would be to drop the ring dips and ring push-ups and instead really seek to build your shoulder strength and mobility (equally if not more important than strength for most adults) through the use of more traditional bodyweight exercises (push-ups progressions, dip progressions on double and single bars, and finally handstand push-up progressions). You need to build up a surplus of strength not only in the muscles themselves, but also the connective tissues, then you can start to dabble with ring support strength elements safely.

I don’t want to post links to other potential competitor websites, so I will just suggest you google Christopher Sommer (he actually wrote a couple articles for T-Nation years ago, but not sure if you can still access them through the archives). He has some outstanding (IMO it actually blows away anyone else currently putting out such information) material on all things bodyweight/gymnastics strength related.

Hope this helps and hope your shoulder heals up quick.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
That sucks! I hate being injured.

If this is a recurring injury though and not the result of a freak acute accident/incident, then I would seriously suggest taking a step back and trying to figure out what the cause might be (muscular imbalance, underdeveloped/conditioned connective tissues, inactive muscle group(s), inappropriate exercise selection, postural dysfunctions/compensations, etc…), unless you want it to continue recurring (and potentially leading to a serious injury.

For instance I noticed you do ring support work (push-ups and dip variations). Let me first state that rings are outstanding tools for building shoulder stability, strength through the core and upper limbs, balance, mobility, and the skills look awesome and are fun too IF you have properly prepared yourself for the demands they place on the body. The problem is that most of us adults have lost the necessary mobility, strength to weight ratio, and connective tissue to muscular strength ratio/balance that we had as children (when most gymnasts begin training on them) and this are not physically prepared to perform ring support strength work (even push-ups). Trying to do so in the absence of proper preparation places us at a much higher risk of injury (and also generally prohibits us from ever being able to perform much besides sloppy partial ROM dips, sloppy push-ups, and sloppy muscle-ups, hence why nobody in the Crossfit world or general fitness world is doing any impressive ring strength elements despite the fact that rings have been on the market and part of the CrossFit scene since the early 2,000’s).

My honest suggestion would be to drop the ring dips and ring push-ups and instead really seek to build your shoulder strength and mobility (equally if not more important than strength for most adults) through the use of more traditional bodyweight exercises (push-ups progressions, dip progressions on double and single bars, and finally handstand push-up progressions). You need to build up a surplus of strength not only in the muscles themselves, but also the connective tissues, then you can start to dabble with ring support strength elements safely.

I don’t want to post links to other potential competitor websites, so I will just suggest you google Christopher Sommer (he actually wrote a couple articles for T-Nation years ago, but not sure if you can still access them through the archives). He has some outstanding (IMO it actually blows away anyone else currently putting out such information) material on all things bodyweight/gymnastics strength related.

Hope this helps and hope your shoulder heals up quick.
[/quote]

Thanks mate, I will certainly look into that. I know what you mean about the ring work, I’ve been doing them regularly for months now. I have also upped the KM to 3 sessions per week. I suspect it’s over use all round.

Overuse is definitely a potential (and likely) cause.

The thing about connective tissue injuries (Tendonitis, Bursitis, strains, sprains, etc…) is they usually don’t occur from just one acute event (they can of course, but are often the result of a more gradual deterioration due to inadequate recovery or preparation). Lots of people over at Sommer’s site were regularly doing ring support work for months prior to winding up injured. Sommer himself has stated that unless you properly prepare your connective tissues and build sufficient mobility (and he has specific guidelines as to how to do that), then you should not be doing ring support work, even if you think you are strong enough to do so. Being a National Team coach who’s athlete make the rest of us look like pathetic weaklings when it comes to Bodyweight strength and who is known for creating extremely strong and durable athletes even among other National team coaches, I tend to believe him.

17 March - no training

Had my 2nd ART treatment to my injured right shoulder. Less painful this time and the therapist noted it was freer than before. The increased ROM was immediately evident, and also the tendon now only pinches in certain scenarios, e.g. the grab the can from top shelf motion. He is also a chiropractor and did a neck adjustment, although it as using a machine rather than the traditional ‘snap and crack’, which he has done for me previously. Personally I believe the latter is more effective, although I was really only there for the ART so the adjustment was a bonus.

Going to do some lower body conditioning later, which will be first physical exercise since Sunday.

I’ve also note an increased stiffness in the posterior chain due to my new job involving too much sitting at a desk. Attempting to counter this be factoring in more ‘movement breaks’ and committing to more stretching in general.

At current rate of recovery, I hope to be doing some light upper body work in the next 5-7 days.

19 March - Home Training - 16 mins (245 kcals) + 5 mins stretching

A) Double KB lunge 4 x 8; 1 min RIs

B) Assisted G/H raise 3 x 8; 1 min RIs

I have developed this exercise using a standard door sit up bar. The basement area where I train has a small step down into it so the sit it bar on the door above sits at an ideal height to enable this exercise. I do not have the strength yet to perform these unassisted and previously concentrated on eccentric training. Last night I changed it to assisted throughout, i.e. push up style throughout. Over 8 reps this created quite a bit of good TUT and I am feeling it this morning (in a good way).

C1) KB single arm row 3 x 12
C2) Pistol squat (using small DB as assistance) 3 x 4
No rest between sets. I am crap at the pistols!

All in all, good sessions despite my shoulder impingement problems. Would have been better had I not forgotten about my shoulder when I did a horizontal elbow strike while passing the heavy bag. Ouch!

Saturday 21 March - home training

Hill sprints 5 X 30 seconds.

Jogged to and from slope. Total training time 16 minutes

Sunday 22 March - home training 16 minutes (265 kcal)

A1) Front Thailand kicks to heavy bag
A2) Left punch heavy bag
1 minute each, little rest as possible X 4 circuits

B1) Roundhouse kicks X 10 per leg
B2) Swiss ball step offs X 10 per leg
X 2 circuits

C1) side kick X 20 per leg
C2) left hand punch X 1 minute
X 2 circuits

Then 10 minutes of stretching

Mon 23 March - Home Training - 16 mins

Shoulder continues to recover but still some way off a return to KM. Did weights workout as follows.

A) Double KB lunge 3 x 10; 1 x 8
B) Single KB row 3 x 20, dropped to 14 reps on left arm by last set
c) G/H raise; emphasis on negative 3 x 5
D) Swiss ball step offs (got this from the recent Scot Abel article) 2 x 20

Then 10 mins of stretching.

Tues 24 March - Home Training - 18 mins

Pretty similar session to Sunday, using left hand only on the heavy bag, as well as roundhouse kicks, Thai front kicks. Max heart rate reached 94%.

Then 12 mins stretching

Wed 25 March - Rest Day

Weigh in: 175lbs; 9.6% BF

Injury update: Shoulder healing slowly. I can do most general tasks and have decent ROM. I have been doing rowing movements during my workouts without any issues. I think the tendon would benefit from ultrasound, which has worked well for me in the past, but I am reluctant to spend more on treatment following my two ART sessions, which cost £76 total.