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Is Training Twice a Week Better Than Four Times?

When I train twice a week, I have don’t have to build my life around the training, I have more time to recover, per Jim’s book deloads are optional and done only if necessary so I should progress faster ( three week cycle vs. four), I spend more time in the gym (two hours on average) which might be a con for some people but on the other side it increases work capacity. So is it any reason why training four times a week would be better?
My sample routine:
DAY1
Bench 531
Reverse grip bench 5x10
Barbell row 3x5 and 5x10 between bench press sets
Squat 531
Front squat 5x5
Leg raises between squats
Prowler. I add a plate every set so they are getting slower but heavier.

DAY2
Push press 531
Press 5x5
Chinups between press sets
Deadlift 531
Sumo deadlift 5x5
Ab wheel between deadlifts
Prawler or suitcase carries

Each workout takes about two hours at easy pace.
Thoughts?

You dont like to get in the training room ?

I do, that is why I train. I also like idea of minimum effective dose for maximum strength.

But why not less volume and maybe 1 more workout ?

Funny thing. Training twice a week gives you the same volume,the same frequency, the same intensity but more recovery time.

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Yes, I am still doing one main lift plus assistance and accessories once a week…
deadlift +press + squat + bench = deadlift ,press + squat,bench …
But more recovery time.

Do you have a newsletter I can subscribe to?

I have done barbell training 2X a week. Dan John has a “minimalist” template that is a two times a week. I have gotten stronger (or at least was recovering to be able to lift a bit more) on such a template. The workouts I did were maybe for 1 hour each.

That said, if fitness and results are your thing, I would add 1-2 days of bodyweight work. I think 2X a week of barbell lifting coupled with 1-2X a week of extra work like dips, inverted rows, pull ups, push ups, and sprints/jumps might be the ideal template for those whose focus is more on performance.

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Train the way you want to train.

I like to train 2 times a week during the warmer months when I am more active with outdoor activities and tend to train 3 to 4 days a week during the colder months.

I have not found one way to be better than the other.

I like that idea. I usually do some mobility work, light ab training and light conditioning with kettlebells on my days off. I can probably do one set of a few bodyweight exercises as an active recovery. Something like “mind over muscle” by Pavel Tsatsouline…

If you are getting results keep at it. There’s no glory for how many days you train. Stay focused on your program and you will see the benefits.

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Each workout of 2 hours of hard strenght work will take 2 days to recover so youre fine with your 2 days a week

It is very, very likely that you can do more quality work in 4 sessions than in 2. So 2 sessions will never be same as 4. This is why people train several times per week, instead of doing one workout per week where they would squat + bench + deadlift + press + row + clean + run etc.

Is 2-day/week good way to train? Yes, it is. Is it better than 4? Only you can answer that. There is no general rule of how many days you should train per week.

Is training twice a week better than training four times/week?

No. It’s just different. For some people, two times/week is ideal. For others, four days/week is perfect. But trying to push four days worth of work in two days is a recipe for disaster.

Balance!

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Appreciate your new 1x/week article Jim - really what I needed to read right now during the busy season.

BasicLly I think everyone is saying that if you’re going to do 2 main lifts on the same day you need to cut down on some of the assistance work. Maybe like 1-2 after your done with the main lifts.

Ex.
Press
Deadlift
Rows
RDLs
Maybe add some face pulls at the end

Yes, but is more better?

It depends. Wendlers reply pretty much sums this conversation.