T Nation

Is This Training Sustainable?


#1

Hey coach, first let me say that you're the writer here that I read the most avidly since you're always spot on when I'm wondering stuff about this lifting game

I'm an intermediate level that has seen recent gains after a looong plateau, doing bench presses with correct technique and decent-deep squats, pretty much everyday, ending sessions with ligther rows and shoulder work (bad imbalance there due to poor-form-too-heavy BP with 0 proper pulling exercises)

I do 1 heavy day and 1 lighter with paused reps. 5-6 sets ramping up.Rep ranges 2-5 (70-92/95%)

Something like
Day A : lighter BP/heavy squat/rows,shoulders
Day B : heavy BP/lighter squat/rows,shoulders

Been doing it for a month now after reading some key stuff in your 20-minutes program. I believe I had 4 rest days, and I'm not even sure about the 4th one

All this got inspired by some of your words (typing only what I can recall) :
- if you were asked what could one do to have a better BP, you'd say "BP every day" (I believe the same goes for squats ?)
- low reps for strength and size with proven rep schemes
- intensity and frequency matter more than volume (20min muscle builder)
- answering 1 commentary in the 20min muscle builder when one talks about a 7/3/3 approach for volume : you said you believe it's the best for a hardgainer

So I'm pretty confident in what I've come up with since heavy squats and BP are basically what I like, along with some trap bar DL that I do once per week instead of a heavy squat day.
Works great and is easier on joints that the 100000's trainings I've tried when I plateau'ed.

Quick questions though :
1_ do you think this way of training is sustainable for longer periods ?
2_ does it need any deload weeks to make it good for a long-term period ?
3_ does adding more exercises (thinking about oly lifts) make overtraining more likely ?


#2

[quote]tontongg wrote:

Quick questions though :
1_ do you think this way of training is sustainable for longer periods ?
2_ does it need any deload weeks to make it good for a long-term period ?
3_ does adding more exercises (thinking about oly lifts) make overtraining more likely ?[/quote]

  1. Sure… that’s pretty much how every olympic lifter trains (except they do snatch, clean & jerk and squats pretty much daily with heavy and ligher days) and also how the russian powerlifters train. In fact the more often you practice them, the better you’ll become at recovering from them. You just have to avoid being too greedy and start going too heavy too often.

  2. Yes, I like this scheme:
    Week 1 = highest volume
    Week 2 = lower volume
    Week 3 = second highest volume
    Week 4 = lowest volume but heavier weights

Start over…

Something like 450 total reps on week 1, 300 total reps on week 2, 400 total reps on week 3, 200 total reps on week 4 (this is the total number of reps for compound movements in the whole training week, it only includes work sets).

  1. Everytime you add exercises you increase the potential for overtraining. Well to be more precise whenever you add volume you increase the potential risk. So If you add exercises you’ll have to reduce volume elsewhere to compensate.

Personally I do 5 exercises on monday, 3 on tuesday, OFF wednesday, 4 on thursday, 2 on friday, 3 or 4 on saturday, 2 or 3 on sunday. Sets are normally 4-6 per exercise.


#3

I’ll look after russian training details

Thanks for the detailed input with the numbers on 2- and 3- , that will definitely help a lot to build a better program. Much appreciated.