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Is This Too Much for Deadlifts?

warm-up:

100x12
120x12
160x12

working-sets:

190x12
210x12
210x12
230x10
230x9
230x10

I been told by a few people that the workout above is way too much for dead-lifts as it can lead to injury due to not performing reps with good form toward the end. For BUILDING MUSCLE how should I go about my dead-lift sets/reps with the warm-ups included.

Last night I did exactly what I posted and it felt great but today had a slight pain in the back which tells me my form must not be all that good towards the end of the 5 “working sets”.

I work back on the same day by doing pull-overs, cable rows and pull downs. I got to say that after the deads I was pretty dead my self but pushed thru with the other exercises and felt good. Should I do back on a seperate day or…ermmm WHAT SHOULD I DO??

thanks.

why do you do so many reps? i find it extremely hard to keep my form perfect when going over 8 reps and that’s why i never go over 6-8 reps with deads. u can go so much heavier than you currently are i bet if u lower ur reps.

You may be burning yourself out before you get to your working sets. A good friend of mine taught me to work up in triples to my max weight. This protocol worked well for me. Pysched up my nervous system and didn’t drain me for my heavier sets.
Give it a try and see what happens.

Michael

[quote]un33q wrote:
why do you do so many reps? i find it extremely hard to keep my form perfect when going over 8 reps and that’s why i never go over 6-8 reps with deads. u can go so much heavier than you currently are i bet if u lower ur reps. [/quote]

I know you are trying to help but you wrote down exactly what I wrote above. Thats not exactly what I’m looking for.

[quote]Michael Petrella wrote:
You may be burning yourself out before you get to your working sets. A good friend of mine taught me to work up in triples to my max weight. This protocol worked well for me. Pysched up my nervous system and didn’t drain me for my heavier sets.
Give it a try and see what happens.

Michael[/quote]

So something like

1x3
1x3
1x3
1x3
1(max)x3

That seems so low for building size. I always thought higher reps was ideal for building lots of size.

[quote]ronaldo7 wrote:
Michael Petrella wrote:
You may be burning yourself out before you get to your working sets. A good friend of mine taught me to work up in triples to my max weight. This protocol worked well for me. Pysched up my nervous system and didn’t drain me for my heavier sets.
Give it a try and see what happens.

Michael

So something like

1x3
1x3
1x3
1x3
1(max)x3

That seems so low for building size. I always thought higher reps was ideal for building lots of size.[/quote]

Believe it or not lifting heavey is another wonderful tool for gaining mass.

Just like explosive lifting and higher volume work.

Just make sure you eat.

EDIT: You could also follow up this max effort work with some higher volume work… perhaps a complimentary posterior chain exercise (RDL/SDL/GM/etc.) and a unilateral knee extension dominant exercise (weighted one legged squats/stepup variations/etc… just some ideas - theres loads to choose from).

Higher reps (up to 15) might be best for sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (which puts on size faster than myofibrillar hypertrophy), but for deadlifts the chance of an injury on higher reps, and the huge level of fatigue outweight the benefits.

put on weight and warm up…

put on whatever you can do for 4-6 reps
do that again
add more so you can get 3 reps
add more so you get 2 reps

something like that, simple and heavy

I would say that you are doing too many reps per set. Keep it between 3-6 reps, 8 reps maximum. Mix it up, some sessions do multiple sets of triples (ie 6sets x 3 reps), other sessions do sets of 5 reps (ie 5x5 or 6x5). As stated before, do a couple of progressively heavier warmup sets of 3 reps.
Doing fewer reps will allow you to use more weight and lessen the chance of injury through your form deteriorating with doing fewer reps.
After the deadlifts, do your normal back routine - some rows, chins/pulldowns, whatever you choose, and do more of a 6-12 rep style.

Waaay to much warmup.

warm up: ankle, hip mobility drils, light stretching of legs and back and maybe some really light stuff for about 6 reps.

working set: 5x5

KEEP PERFECT FORM! Injuries suck man; I haven’t deadlifted in over a year.

I’d say just focus on lifting HEAVY(1-5rep) in the deadlift.In a year from now if your lifting 200lbs more than you are now, you will be able to see a difference in the mirror. And like vicop said, just hit higher reps on your other back exercises.

warm up:
100x12
120x8
160x8
200x4

Working set
250x ?

After that, if you are feeling brave, you can lower the weight and do a set of 15 or 20 reps.
Just reset the weight on the floor between every rep to ensure proper form, to avoid trouble keeping a safe form.

But in the end it all comes down to progression and goals. Doing your way you have been able to put more weight every time you do deadlifts?

By no means the warm ups that i wrote are static, you can warm up in any way you want, as long as you dont tire yourself.

[quote]ronaldo7 wrote:

That seems so low for building size. I always thought higher reps was ideal for building lots of size.[/quote]

So you think 101 reps of any exercise isn’t excessive? Also, you need to remember that you did a bunch of back work after the deadlifts so you have way too much volume.

Try the heavier weight and lower reps like everyone suggests. If you keep in the accessory work you should be more than a little toasted.

I personally warmup with RDLs/SLDLs going something like 135x10, 185x5, 225x3, 275x2. Then I load 315 and drop it to the floor and pull singles jumping about 20lbs up to a max weight I can do for a triple or double and try to add 5-10lbs to that every week.

I used to do lots of higher rep DL work like you are doing and I find that doing it this way I don’t ever have issues keeping my form, my lower back hasn’t been feeling as raped, and I’m getting progressively stronger each week.

[quote]ronaldo7 wrote:
Michael Petrella wrote:
You may be burning yourself out before you get to your working sets. A good friend of mine taught me to work up in triples to my max weight. This protocol worked well for me. Pysched up my nervous system and didn’t drain me for my heavier sets.
Give it a try and see what happens.

Michael

So something like

1x3
1x3
1x3
1x3
1(max)x3

That seems so low for building size. I always thought higher reps was ideal for building lots of size.[/quote]

Sorry you got me wrong.
Use triples for your warm up sets. When you get up to the working sets you can use whatever rep and set range you deem appropriate.
For example if you finished at 200lb and wanted to do a 3x10 it would look like this.

1 set - 100x3
1 set - 135x3
1 set - 150x3
1 set - 185x3

3 sets - 200x10

What I was trying to go for was still warming up and getting the CNS to start firing without burning yourself out before you get to the working sets.
Hopes this clarifies.
Good luck.

Michael

[quote]Michael Petrella wrote:
ronaldo7 wrote:
Michael Petrella wrote:
You may be burning yourself out before you get to your working sets. A good friend of mine taught me to work up in triples to my max weight. This protocol worked well for me. Pysched up my nervous system and didn’t drain me for my heavier sets.
Give it a try and see what happens.

Michael

So something like

1x3
1x3
1x3
1x3
1(max)x3

That seems so low for building size. I always thought higher reps was ideal for building lots of size.

Sorry you got me wrong.
Use triples for your warm up sets. When you get up to the working sets you can use whatever rep and set range you deem appropriate.
For example if you finished at 200lb and wanted to do a 3x10 it would look like this.

1 set - 100x3
1 set - 135x3
1 set - 150x3
1 set - 185x3

3 sets - 200x10

What I was trying to go for was still warming up and getting the CNS to start firing without burning yourself out before you get to the working sets.
Hopes this clarifies.
Good luck.

Michael
[/quote]

Got you. Sounds like a good idea since I will somehow lift heavy and then kill it at the end with higher reps.

Thanks all for your replys. It’s safe to say that lower volume and heavier weight is the way to go for dead-lifts to prevent injury.