T Nation

Is this Going to Injure Me?


#1

I really want to work on doing the splits, front and side. as well as touch my nose to the ground while doing that ham/groin seated wide leg stretch.

but I am a competitive powerlifter.

can being too mobile make me more injury prone when handling loads of ~600lbs on the squat and deadlift?


#2

I know that I asked a question regarding hamstring flexibility a while ago, but there wasn't much response.


#3

Yes, in theory being too mobile can be a problem for a powerlifter. The levels of flexibility you are talking about may or may not affect your powerlifting. I can come close to touching my nose to the ground on the seated stretch, but I'm still a long ways from being able to do any splits.

The flexibility I have now is about all I want or need as a powerlifter. In my case become significantly more flexible would likely have a detrimental effect on my SQ.
Why to you want to be so flexible anyway?


#4

mobility and instability are not the same.


#5

I would argue that severe inflexibility would lead to injuries as one would not be able to handle those stresses but who IDK, I'm speculating.

I can say it would be cool to see someone bang out a 600+ # squat and then drop down to do the splits as a 'victory dance'- lol


#6

Aren't there several Pro level bodybuilders who are capable of doing the splits and do them regularly in routines? A lot of those guys are fully capable of a 600lb squat with no issue.

INflexibility would be a bigger problem I think- not allowign for the proper ROM in your lifts. I don't think you will have any problems by trying to improve. I can't imagine it would just happen over night that you can do the splits but all the sudden you are instable in your squats.

I rambled a lot there but I think it made sense...


#7

#8

You are correct.

Shouldn't bother your strength sessions.


#9

This.

Jason


#10

I can't see being more flexible as being dangerous in anyway. I wouldn't be trying to do the splits shortly before or during your workouts though for obvious reasons.


#11

Being more flexible can only help, I don't know what that other guy is smoking. I'll be damned if you become hyperflexible just by training to do the split.


#12

Flexibility is good. Excessive flexibility would hinder you though.

As long as you don't try to attain 210 degree side splits, I think you'll be okay.


#13

Well, It is actually fucking me up. I have too much static flexibility in my groin now, and my hip is tracking strangely. This is making my sumo deadlift hurt like hell in the hip flexor/groin area.

I'm not going to give up totally though, instead, for the next 4-8 weeks I'll allow myself to do flexibility work, but ONLY while moving through a range of motion under some minimal load at least.

So, dropping the static stretches and switching them out for wide stance pullthroughs, sumo pin pulls, and sumo RDLs/SLDLs. Along with band ab/adduction x20 for a few sets before and after workouts.

It's quite weird, because squatting with my heels around 24 inches apart gives me absolutely no pain, but as soon as it's a dead pull with the exact same stance or wider, my medial hip flexor/pectineus area just pinches like a son of a bitch and I cant drive hard with my full strength.

So static stretching CAN fuck you up, if you are a dumbass like me and open up new ROM that hasn't been used in a dynamic fashion


#14

Well, I do think that you have to consider that with new ROM comes more room for you to get stronger.

Imagine a guy who has bad flexibility doing "ATG" squats. Maybe he is getting as low as he can but it's not all the way down. He gets strong.

He starts working on flexibility, and is now able to get deeper, to where this is no possible way he could get deeper. He is not going to be as strong in the now ROM until he works it up.

That's the same for you. By opening up a larger ROM, you have more to work. I hope that makes sense...


#15

This makes perfect sense to me. I think this is the only scenario where you could be perceived as being weaker. I don't see how being more flexible can possibly make you weaker, it's only going to make you less prone to injuries.

Of course you may find you need to change things a little bit in the way you lift with your better flexibility. One example is a person I train olympic lifting with started out being quite inflexible. This meant when he snatched he would just throw the bar back and his lack of flexibility would stop the bar from going behind as his shoulders simply couldn't move that way. Now as his mobility is better he needs to not overpull to stop the bar going behind. But all in all it is much more beneficial to him to have increased his flexibility.