T Nation

Is this a Good Balanced Routine?


#1

am mainly interested in health/functional strength, but a bit physique on the side is a bonus:
am 27, 5'8, 80kg

upper body in sequence(twice a week if doing legs, 3 if not):
3 x 10 assisted pull ups [i do one set for opposing muscle groups back to back]
3 x 10 db shoulder press (20 kg)

3 x 10 db one arm rows (22.5kg) [i have a really prominent lower pec muscle, that grows
3 x 10 inclined db press (22.5kg) so i am trying to balance it out]

3 x 10 assisted chin ups
3 x 10 dips

3x 10 db shrugs (22.5kg)
1 set of reverse curls (12kg)

20-30 reps of crunches (i know ridiculous)
20-30 back extensions

Legs (one a week i haven't started yet, got a knee injury, but am much stronger lower body than lower):

4 x 12-15 squats i used 130kg but probably start on 60-80 kg)
3 x 12 stiff legged or Romanian deadlifts
3 x 12 leg press
3 x 12 leg extension
3 x 12 hamstring curls
3 x 15 calf raises

i would like to go back to boxing or take up a grappling sport, hows the routine, i tried to keep it mostly compound exercises???


#2

2 upper body sessions a week with only 1 leg day? Whether or not you think you have a strong lower body this is not smart. At the very least, if your doing a upper lower split you should alternate it every week. i.e. Week 1 = 2 upper body, 1 lower; week 2 = 1 upper, 2 lower; etc ...

In your upper body routine, where's your bench press? Every routine, no matter what program your following should include The Squat; the Dead Lift; The Bench Press and the Pull-Up.

You're saying you want to develop strength, why then on every training day are you working with high reps? You don't seem to be doing any maximum effort or Dynamic effort work; If you want to develop strength you should be incorporating these methods of training into your routine, especially if you want to take up a combat sport.


#3

Don't make your own routine.

Someone else who knows more has already done it better.

There are a multitude of balanced programs right here on T-Nation for whatever you need, be it fat loss or strength gains.


#4

i didn't make it clear, am doing inclined dumbbell press, or are you suggesting i should be doing flat barbell bench press? am doing assisted machine pull ups, i stopped weightlifting for many months so i can only probably do 6 clean pull ups as a max or sets of 4-3 pull ups.

i would love doing proper dead lifts again but i have long term wrist injury (3 years, soft tissue damage) just my current flimsy routine inflammes it and i have to use ibuprofen gels to calm it down, a deadlift would probably be just a little too much at the moment.

but ur absolutely right, i dont feel like am pushing myself with the weights & reps, actually i have been doing this routine with similar weights on-off (with many months gap in between) since i injured my wrist in early 2006, with little return. what kind of rep range should i be aiming for? is 6 reasonable??

thanks


#5

DO you have wrist wraps? If not get some, these will help reduce the pressure you put on your wrists when lifting and thus reduce the inflammation you suffer from training. As well as regular wrist wraps get a pair of the variety with power hooks attached. Most people use these when doing dead lifts at weights their grip strength can't yet support. Again, I think these would work well at reducing the stress you put your wrist under. The down-side to using this equipment is that your grip strength, and overall arm strength, will suffer.

To counter act this I'd include some grip work at the end of every training session. Targeted grip work, by building up forearm and hand strength, will also help with your injury. Stronger muscles in the area surrounding your wrist means these muscles can take over a lot of the pressure being put on the injury both in and out of the gym. After 3 years if your still suffering to the extent you say you are then this will take a long time to do as you'll have to start off with light, short work and build up slowly so as not to aggravate the injury further. If you have a physiotherapist, and if they're any good, they should be able to prescribe exercises to get you started, but I recommend you get some grippers (I use captains of crush from Iron Mind) as well as Iron Minds hand health kit.

Anyway, apologies for going off on a bit of a tangent, back to the question at hand. Rep ranges will depend on what kind of training day your doing i.e. a Max effort (ME) session will usually be 1-3 reps per set working up to your 1RM, supplemental work with your ME lift I would recommend be in the 3-5 rep range for 3-4 sets.
If your doing a Dynamic Effort (DE) session then you should working 3-5 reps of 3-4 sets lifting around 60% of your 1RM for that lift (as you get stronger and your body learns to recruit more muscle fibers for this % will actually drop down to 40-50%). For a Repetition Effort (RE) day, your current ranges look OK to me.

I would recommend you do a flat BB Bench Press, it is one of the top three lifts that should not be ignored. In my opinion an incline DB bench is a good supplemental exercise for the Bench Press. For your Pull-Ups, even if you can only do Sets of 1 rep, I would also recommend unsupported lifts and build your way up, you'd be surprised how fast you can build up your strength in this way as opposed to a supported lift.

Anyway, hope I haven't overloaded you with too much info and given you something you can use, happy lifting.


#6

cheers!


#7

dynamic effort has no purpose in this guys program. I DOUBT he can squat that already little weight correctly if his routine looks like this. I wouldn't have anyone squatting less then 3 plates do DE work. I feel it would be pointless. Anything less then that should be DE weight. It's recommended beginners do RE days focussed on perfecting form and gaining size. What he doesn't need is bad advice about a powerlifting technique, when he's not powerlifting.


#8

If you can do DB rows, you can deadlift or rack pull

I would do an upper/lower over 4 days or chest+arm/legs/back+shoulders over Monday-Tuesday-Thurs or Friday

any more questions? what kind of lifting do you enjoy? To me that seems why you want to do it. Not exactly to be huge.


#9

You have got to be kidding. Dynamic Effort work has no place in his program??? He say's he wants to take up a combat sport. Dynamic Effort has no place in this program? Really?
To begin with DE work covers a lot more than just lifting weight as fast as you can with 50% of you 1RM. Box jumps are DE work, plyometric work of any kind is DE ... Sprinting while dragging a sled ... DE. This trianing methods absolutely have a place in his program, just as they have a place in the program of anyone looking to get stronger.


#10

You have got to be kidding. Dynamic Effort work has no place in his program??? He say's he wants to take up a combat sport. Dynamic Effort has no place in this program? Really?
To begin with DE work covers a lot more than just lifting weight as fast as you can with 50% of you 1RM. Box jumps are DE work, plyometric work of any kind is DE ... Sprinting while dragging a sled ... DE. This trianing methods absolutely have a place in his program, just as they have a place in the program of anyone looking to get stronger.


#11

x2 Either pick something that one of the contributors wrote or look into the other experienced members programs. Got to be honest what you've written really isnt a great program.

If you want to get into grappling and need to include dynamic work try looking into the westside program. There is more to a balanced program than simply doing the opposing movement.


#12

So basically you're saying he should train for sport. It's a really scary thought having this guy google DE work and seeing big guys with big weight and band tension on the bar. See where this is bad? Even still. He would be much better benefited with RE days, and training for sport as his coach sees fit. Box jumps and sled drags may be too much fatigue on top of sports training.