T Nation

Is Stretching Good?


#1

Is stretching any good bodybuilding wise?

This type of stretching;


#2

Stretching won’t build muscle, but a routine like that video would be fine after lifting or on a separate day. Static stretching generally has a bad rap, but like with most things, there’s no problem with it as part of a well-designed plan.

And seriously, for the love of all things holy, stop thinking about taking steroids. You need to take steroids about as much as Kai Greene needs to make another grapefruit video.


#3

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Stretching won’t build muscle, but a routine like that video would be fine after lifting or on a separate day. Static stretching generally has a bad rap, but like with most things, there’s no problem with it as part of a well-designed plan.

And seriously, for the love of all things holy, stop thinking about taking steroids. You need to take steroids about as much as Kai Greene needs to make another grapefruit video.[/quote]
more people like you should be around here. i feel like there are way too many members on TRT because of botched/too many cycles. Some people like it because then they can do more steroids but im a big picture kind of guy and i dont want my nuts shut down for the rest of my life.


#4

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Stretching won’t build muscle, but a routine like that video would be fine after lifting or on a separate day. Static stretching generally has a bad rap, but like with most things, there’s no problem with it as part of a well-designed plan.


[/quote]

Just wanna play devil’s advocate.
I feel as though static stretching could be useful in pursuit of hypertrophy.
In the grand scheme of things, it takes a challenging load/resistance, along with proper stimulation to induce growth.

With that said, tightness causes muscle inhibition. Namely in the stabilizers. Not only does muscle inhibition increase the risk of injury, but it also reduces the amount of output via golgi tendons/muscle spindles.

An example we’d all be kind of familiar with would be a KB press. Someone with a lack of mobility in the shoulders (usually due to inhibition, incorrect firing patterns, flexibility) would be limited in the amount of workload the shoulder can handle. Now this is interchangeable with any exercise really. Someone who can only quarter squat because of hip tightness. Or maybe they can’t go too deep because the back rounds due to hammie tightness. etc etc.

I understand OP is asking if stretching directly induces growth… but if you think about it, nothing you do ‘directly’ induces anything. It’s always a combination of work, eat, sleep, and the micro managing in between that makes the difference.

Just a thought.


#5

[quote]Jarvan wrote:
Just wanna play devil’s advocate. [/quote]
I wouldn’t say that’s so much Devil’s advocate as it is expanding on the general idea.

I agree that improving ROM and muscle activation can lead to improved gains, but I’d also say that’s not best achieved from static stretching, especially the type demo’d in the OP’s video. Tissue quality work (foam rolling, mobility drills, etc.) and other stretching techniques like PNF stretching would be more appropriate.

Also, it’s worth noting that Doggcrapp lifters definitely do rely on loaded stretches as a key part of their growth/recovery plan. The effectiveness of muscle fascia stretching might be debatable, but DC guys seem to believe in it enough.


#6

Stretching is great for mobility especially for the big lifts like squat and deadlift.


#7

Stretching postworkout a must for me, dramatically lowers soreness the next day and will stop small strains/niggles turning into injuries


#8

For direct growth this kind of stuff can work wonders for some people(and nothing for others)…


#9

Stretching is good after a work-out!


#10

Lots of people here do martial arts, yoga, mobility WOD’s. In my opinion, mobility is a generally a good thing.

YES, there could be some concern about choosing joint stability and strength over hyperflexibility but that’s not usually a big concern for most people here. You don’t want to get really aggressive, particularly with your low back, but maintaining ROM is a good thing in the “Move Well, Be Awesome” scheme of things, IMO.