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Is Starting Strength Neccessary?

Just want to ask a question. Every forum ive been to everyone has recommended Ss to a person starting out. Couldnt a split be just as effective if you teach the beginner the correct form/ positives and negatives on all the exercises especially the compound movements I.e. bench squat deadlift Mp.

because you are doing an exercise 3 times a week instead of once - the more frequently you do it, the better you get at it

No starting strength isn’t neccessary. There are plenty of programs that are great for beginners, including starting strength. The reason it gets suggested so often is because it’s simple and just plain works.

No single training program is ever “necessary”.

Like Caveman said, Starting Strength relies on teaching the beginner proper technique through frequent practice. It works for beginners, especially underweight beginners, because it tells them to get stronger on basic exercises while eating plentiful calories.

But in general, yes… push-pull splits work, upper-lower splits work, full body training works. Lots of things work.

A bodybuilder routine would typically involve a split that has a lot of different muscle groups for a rep range that causes hypertrophy. That sort of workout can leave a muscle group sore for days and unable to train that muscle group again. This is why most muscle groups on bodybuilder splits are only trained once per week. Therefore, the fastest you can add weight would be 5-10 lbs per week on any given exercise.

Starting Strength is a total body strength workout that keeps the volume relatively low, but just high enough to force an adaptation. Therefore you can hit the same muscle groups multiple times per week and make faster gains.

Once strength levels have gotten to the point that you can actually move some serious weight, then switching to a bodybuilder split can yield great results, but until this point the trainee is simply unable to move enough weight to make any bit of difference. It’s not that bodybuilder routines don’t work, it’s that they aren’t the most efficient path to developing strength and muscle for a beginner.

Now, I realize that you didn’t specifically say you were looking at a bodybuilder split. As Chris pointed out, there are plenty of splits that work where you can hit the big compounds multiple times per week (push pull, upper lower, etc.). I just used that as an example to explain why lower volume + multiple total body workouts per week can yield pretty quick strength gains for a beginner.

No, but the reason why it’s recommended so often is because of the feedback. Of course you can still improve form on a bodybuilding split. However the more often a movement is practiced the better you’ll get at it.

[quote]Zerpp wrote:
No, but the reason why it’s recommended so often is because of the feedback. Of course you can still improve form on a bodybuilding split. However the more often a movement is practiced the better you’ll get at it.[/quote]

being mindful and conscious of rep quality with every rep can have a similar effect. writing down in your log how a certain position, grip, etc. affects a certain movement can help you improve it by the next session.

mindlessly churning out reps, even three times a week, will not.

[quote]fr0IVIan wrote:

[quote]Zerpp wrote:
No, but the reason why it’s recommended so often is because of the feedback. Of course you can still improve form on a bodybuilding split. However the more often a movement is practiced the better you’ll get at it.[/quote]

being mindful and conscious of rep quality with every rep can have a similar effect. writing down in your log how a certain position, grip, etc. affects a certain movement can help you improve it by the next session.

mindlessly churning out reps, even three times a week, will not.[/quote]

I agree, mindless churning even leads to injuries when weights get heavier.

Everything works… just so happens that starting strength works better than most.

[quote]RomanianRock wrote:
Everything works… just so happens that starting strength works better than what most beginners do, putzing around cluelessly in the gym.[/quote]

fixed

If Starting Strength was necessary, how did people ever make progress before the book came out?

[quote]fr0IVIan wrote:

[quote]RomanianRock wrote:
Everything works… just so happens that starting strength works better than what most beginners do, putzing around cluelessly in the gym.[/quote]

fixed
[/quote]

didnt even ask for permission

[quote]Anthony Mychal wrote:
If Starting Strength was necessary, how did people ever make progress before the book came out?[/quote]

/thread

it is not necessary obviously but it is a great place to start. Something that quite often people underestimate bouncing from program to program is workload adaptation.

You want to create a progression with the volume you handle. You start with a handful of exercises and slowly progress toward and more bodybuilding like routine building your work capacity over time and eliciting adaptive responses.

Using advanced splits and training will only hinder your progress. Give it time :slight_smile:

if you study SS you realize that’s exactly what it does, you keep on adding exercises with time.

[quote]Anthony Mychal wrote:
If Starting Strength was necessary, how did people ever make progress before the book came out?[/quote]
Correct me if I’m wrong but Starting Strength predates lifting.

Said to have been discovered by Mark Rippetoe in the early 1800’s buried in a hillside of what would end up being present-day New York State.

I can’t remember the rest of the story but if you want to start to gain strength you must do this program to the letter with intensity and consistency. Also, eat A LOT.