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Is My Weight Lifting Routine Good?

Hello,

I was boxing for 3 years and currently stopped boxing, but I have a wish to practice that along with weight-lifting.

I want to GROW flexible, fast and agile muscles and >>>

I have made-up a routine 3 times a week, but not sure if it is good for strength and muscle growth. I will be grateful if you could check it out and tell if I have to add or change something and if the order of exercises is proper to gain muscles, become strong and fast? And if this is enough?

I have heard that if human will do cardio and weight-lifting in one week, though on different days, will prevent human from gaining as much muscle as he could, if he would do only weight-lifting. So, it brought me one more question: Will my program, that has one cardio day, prevent me from gaining strong, fast and agile muscles?

Hope on your advice to understand what I am doing

Program: Started 2 weeks ago…

Monday, Training #1:

I rest (walk, stretch) 1 min 30 sec between sets and 3 minutes between exercises.

I do these exercises in this order:

  1. Warm-up (Jogging 5 minutes followed by stretching etc.)
  2. Weighted Dips 3-5 reps up-to MAX. Currently using 35LB
  3. Explosive Push-ups 15 reps (do this right after weights just to flex muscles for explosion after weights)
  4. Chest Supported Rows 4 sets of 10-15 reps. Currently using 30LB. Each set followed by 10 E-push ups.
  5. Bent-Over Dumbbell Rear Delt Flyes 2-3 sets of 12-15 reps. Currently using 10LB. Each set followed by 10 E-push ups.
  6. Chin ups 4 sets of 8 reps (somehow weak at it…). Without weights. Each set followed by 10 E-push ups
  7. Dumbbell Snatch 3 sets of 5 reps. (haven’t done it yet in my trainings so I don’t know what weight I would use, but planning on doing this exercise too).
  8. Romanian Deadlift 3-4 sets of 6-10 reps. Currently using 70LB
  9. Front Squat Push Press 3 sets of 8 reps. Currently using 70LB
  10. Weighted Calf Raises 30 reps with 70LB dumbbells (35 x 2 Dumbbells)

Wednesday, Training #2:

  1. Interval Running 2 x 400 meters, 1 minutes jogging between runs.
  2. Jumping Rope 3 minutes
  3. Warm-up (Stretching etc.)
  4. Flexibility stretching
  5. Shadow-Boxing 3 minutes
  6. Marching Technique 2 sets x 1 minute
  7. Single Step Jumps 15 reps
  8. Double Feet Jump 15 reps
  9. Shadow-Boxing 3 minutes

Friday, Training #1: Detailed above

This looks pretty awful for your goals.

General advice: if you don’t know what you are doing (nothing wrong with that, no beginner does), follow a program that was written by an expert. Don’t try to be smarter than the rest, it’s a terrible waste of time.

What is your available equipment? Do you go to a gym or train at home?

I would really like to see you get 5/3/1 and start on that, two days a week if you’re boxing, four days a week if you’re not and you want to concentrate on muscle growth.

There’s too many sets and no clear goals in the workout you posted.

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
This looks pretty awful for your goals.

General advice: if you don’t know what you are doing (nothing wrong with that, no beginner does), follow a program that was written by an expert. Don’t try to be smarter than the rest, it’s a terrible waste of time.

What is your available equipment? Do you go to a gym or train at home?[/quote]

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
I would really like to see you get 5/3/1 and start on that, two days a week if you’re boxing, four days a week if you’re not and you want to concentrate on muscle growth.

There’s too many sets and no clear goals in the workout you posted.[/quote]

Thanks, I will look at 5/3/1, however, my goal is to increase power, strength, speed and agility. If my workout doesn’t meet any of this goals, could you specify what exactly is wrong and if possible, why? Thanks.

[quote]AknurA wrote:
Thanks, I will look at 5/3/1, however, my goal is to increase power, strength, speed and agility. If my workout doesn’t meet any of this goals, could you specify what exactly is wrong and if possible, why? Thanks. [/quote]

You’re doing too much, too infrequently. You’ve heard of a number of exercises… This will do this, this will do that, so you just made a list of everything you want to do. That’s not programming - proper programming means you know what to leave out.

Let me explain how you could do this…

  • Level one: strength. Focus on a VERY SMALL number of compound exercise and do a strength program with these 2-4x a week. These are: deadlifts, squats (front/high bar/low bar, whatever you like most), overhead presses, bench presses, pull ups, rows. That’s all you’re going to do. Strength is important because it is the foundation for explosiveness - get stronger and you have more explosive potential.
  • Level two: power. Start each workout with medicine ball throws or box jumps. do these like you mean it. These will be your power exercises.
  • Level three: speed and agility. If you want these for boxing, then box. No weight exercise will teach you how to hit faster.

Furthermore, please realise that the weightroom is there to make you stronger and bigger. There is no such thing as an agile muscle - agility is a matter of coordination, not of muscles. Do a basic program (like 5/3/1) and eat enough food to gain weight. Do not make this more complicated than it is.

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]AknurA wrote:
Thanks, I will look at 5/3/1, however, my goal is to increase power, strength, speed and agility. If my workout doesn’t meet any of this goals, could you specify what exactly is wrong and if possible, why? Thanks. [/quote]

You’re doing too much, too infrequently. You’ve heard of a number of exercises… This will do this, this will do that, so you just made a list of everything you want to do. That’s not programming - proper programming means you know what to leave out.

Let me explain how you could do this…

  • Level one: strength. Focus on a VERY SMALL number of compound exercise and do a strength program with these 2-4x a week. These are: deadlifts, squats (front/high bar/low bar, whatever you like most), overhead presses, bench presses, pull ups, rows. That’s all you’re going to do. Strength is important because it is the foundation for explosiveness - get stronger and you have more explosive potential.
  • Level two: power. Start each workout with medicine ball throws or box jumps. do these like you mean it. These will be your power exercises.
  • Level three: speed and agility. If you want these for boxing, then box. No weight exercise will teach you how to hit faster.

Furthermore, please realise that the weightroom is there to make you stronger and bigger. There is no such thing as an agile muscle - agility is a matter of coordination, not of muscles. Do a basic program (like 5/3/1) and eat enough food to gain weight. Do not make this more complicated than it is.[/quote]

Much appreciated! And…

Level one: Strength - it seems for me like I was doing exactly this in my program #1, wasn’t I?

[quote]AknurA wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]AknurA wrote:
Thanks, I will look at 5/3/1, however, my goal is to increase power, strength, speed and agility. If my workout doesn’t meet any of this goals, could you specify what exactly is wrong and if possible, why? Thanks. [/quote]

You’re doing too much, too infrequently. You’ve heard of a number of exercises… This will do this, this will do that, so you just made a list of everything you want to do. That’s not programming - proper programming means you know what to leave out.

Let me explain how you could do this…

  • Level one: strength. Focus on a VERY SMALL number of compound exercise and do a strength program with these 2-4x a week. These are: deadlifts, squats (front/high bar/low bar, whatever you like most), overhead presses, bench presses, pull ups, rows. That’s all you’re going to do. Strength is important because it is the foundation for explosiveness - get stronger and you have more explosive potential.
  • Level two: power. Start each workout with medicine ball throws or box jumps. do these like you mean it. These will be your power exercises.
  • Level three: speed and agility. If you want these for boxing, then box. No weight exercise will teach you how to hit faster.

Furthermore, please realise that the weightroom is there to make you stronger and bigger. There is no such thing as an agile muscle - agility is a matter of coordination, not of muscles. Do a basic program (like 5/3/1) and eat enough food to gain weight. Do not make this more complicated than it is.[/quote]

Much appreciated! And…

Level one: Strength - it seems for me like I was doing exactly this in my program #1, wasn’t I?
[/quote]
No, you were doing a very small number of exercises, which by most standards is somewhere from 1 to 4, total number of sets ranging from 10-25. What you are doing is 9 different exercises, 4 of which fit the described exercises even closely. Seriously, if strength and muscle growth while training sports is what you are after its hard to beat simple progressions like 5/3/1 that focus on progressively loading the basic exercises.

Exactly. The point is this: limit he number of exercises. Don’t try to make your training schedule a Swiss army knife - to stay with the metaphor, just get a decent blade, good screwdriver and a good pair of pliers. Minimise.
One of the most popular programs is 5x5. It goes like this:

day 1 - squat, bench press, row
day 2 - squat, overhead press, deadlift

there’s Bill Starr’s 5x5…

squat, bench, power clean 3x a week with varying precentages

a typical squat day on 5/3/1 could look like this…

squat, front squat, back extension

Do you get the picture? Do less and really hammer each set that you do.

[quote]Fistiecuffs wrote:

[quote]AknurA wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]AknurA wrote:
Thanks, I will look at 5/3/1, however, my goal is to increase power, strength, speed and agility. If my workout doesn’t meet any of this goals, could you specify what exactly is wrong and if possible, why? Thanks. [/quote]

You’re doing too much, too infrequently. You’ve heard of a number of exercises… This will do this, this will do that, so you just made a list of everything you want to do. That’s not programming - proper programming means you know what to leave out.

Let me explain how you could do this…

  • Level one: strength. Focus on a VERY SMALL number of compound exercise and do a strength program with these 2-4x a week. These are: deadlifts, squats (front/high bar/low bar, whatever you like most), overhead presses, bench presses, pull ups, rows. That’s all you’re going to do. Strength is important because it is the foundation for explosiveness - get stronger and you have more explosive potential.
  • Level two: power. Start each workout with medicine ball throws or box jumps. do these like you mean it. These will be your power exercises.
  • Level three: speed and agility. If you want these for boxing, then box. No weight exercise will teach you how to hit faster.

Furthermore, please realise that the weightroom is there to make you stronger and bigger. There is no such thing as an agile muscle - agility is a matter of coordination, not of muscles. Do a basic program (like 5/3/1) and eat enough food to gain weight. Do not make this more complicated than it is.[/quote]

Much appreciated! And…

Level one: Strength - it seems for me like I was doing exactly this in my program #1, wasn’t I?
[/quote]
No, you were doing a very small number of exercises, which by most standards is somewhere from 1 to 4, total number of sets ranging from 10-25. What you are doing is 9 different exercises, 4 of which fit the described exercises even closely. Seriously, if strength and muscle growth while training sports is what you are after its hard to beat simple progressions like 5/3/1 that focus on progressively loading the basic exercises. [/quote]

Thank you, I will focus on 1-4 exercises with total of 10-25 sets.

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
Exactly. The point is this: limit he number of exercises. Don’t try to make your training schedule a Swiss army knife - to stay with the metaphor, just get a decent blade, good screwdriver and a good pair of pliers. Minimise.
One of the most popular programs is 5x5. It goes like this:

day 1 - squat, bench press, row
day 2 - squat, overhead press, deadlift

there’s Bill Starr’s 5x5…

squat, bench, power clean 3x a week with varying precentages

a typical squat day on 5/3/1 could look like this…

squat, front squat, back extension

Do you get the picture? Do less and really hammer each set that you do.[/quote]

Thank you, I will do either 5/3/1 or 5x5.

What about cardio that I do on Training day #2 ? Is it going to prevent human from gaining mass if done once-twice per week?

[quote]AknurA wrote:
What about cardio that I do on Training day #2 ? Is it going to prevent human from gaining mass if done once-twice per week? [/quote]

It doesn’t’ look like you’re doing a whole lot of cardio in that workout.

But if you’re seriously concerned about mass gain, then you probably shouldn’t be boxing. You need to pick a goal and stick to it. Boxing one or two days a week for cardio in between lifting is probably OK as long as you’re doing cardio-boxing shit and not real boxing. But if you’re going to really box, lifting three or four days a week is going to have you chasing too many goals.

What’s your prime goal? And don’t say, “Boxing while adding muscle mass and cardio.” Everyone wants that. What’s your ONE prime goal? Because everything else you do should be based around helping that one prime goal.

Try this.
Monday:
Squat8x3
Ab wheel-50 total

Wednesday:
Bench5x5
OHP5x5

Friday:
Deadlift-6x2
Pullups-50 total

Then just add 15 minutes kettlebell or bodyweight tabata training after each workout.You will have no need to do any extra cardio. It wont get you jacked but it will get you strong and the tabata will greatly increase work capacity.

It dosnt matter what % of your max you are using on the big lifts just try and improve each week. Just keep in mind for sports that all lifting is GPP so don’t get to concerned with it.

pull ups, dip, push ups, squats. get rid of all the other shit

[quote]Jarvan wrote:
pull ups, dip, push ups, squats. get rid of all the other shit[/quote]

Depending on what you mean when you say ‘squats’… unweighted, two-legged bodyweight squats are useless for gaining mass. There, I said it.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

[quote]AknurA wrote:
What about cardio that I do on Training day #2 ? Is it going to prevent human from gaining mass if done once-twice per week? [/quote]

It doesn’t’ look like you’re doing a whole lot of cardio in that workout.

But if you’re seriously concerned about mass gain, then you probably shouldn’t be boxing. You need to pick a goal and stick to it. Boxing one or two days a week for cardio in between lifting is probably OK as long as you’re doing cardio-boxing shit and not real boxing. But if you’re going to really box, lifting three or four days a week is going to have you chasing too many goals.

What’s your prime goal? And don’t say, “Boxing while adding muscle mass and cardio.” Everyone wants that. What’s your ONE prime goal? Because everything else you do should be based around helping that one prime goal.[/quote]

Thanks, I understood.

[quote]TimCline wrote:
Try this.
Monday:
Squat8x3
Ab wheel-50 total

Wednesday:
Bench5x5
OHP5x5

Friday:
Deadlift-6x2
Pullups-50 total

Then just add 15 minutes kettlebell or bodyweight tabata training after each workout.You will have no need to do any extra cardio. It wont get you jacked but it will get you strong and the tabata will greatly increase work capacity.

It dosnt matter what % of your max you are using on the big lifts just try and improve each week. Just keep in mind for sports that all lifting is GPP so don’t get to concerned with it.[/quote]

Thanks, appreciated.

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]Jarvan wrote:
pull ups, dip, push ups, squats. get rid of all the other shit[/quote]

Right. Because deadlifts are so overrated for gaining size.

This may come across as a jibe against you personally but what it really is is frustration at the fact that a misinformed newbie starts a thread and, rather than telling him to do something that works, people start adding fluff.
Also, depending on what you mean when you say ‘squats’… unweighted, two-legged bodyweight squats are useless for gaining mass. There, I said it.
[/quote]

Agree with you about the undweighted squats.
However, was you serious that deadlifts are so overrated???

[quote]AknurA wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]Jarvan wrote:
pull ups, dip, push ups, squats. get rid of all the other shit[/quote]

Right. Because deadlifts are so overrated for gaining size.

This may come across as a jibe against you personally but what it really is is frustration at the fact that a misinformed newbie starts a thread and, rather than telling him to do something that works, people start adding fluff.
Also, depending on what you mean when you say ‘squats’… unweighted, two-legged bodyweight squats are useless for gaining mass. There, I said it.
[/quote]

Agree with you about the undweighted squats.
However, was you serious that deadlifts are so overrated??? [/quote]

No. I was being sarcastic.
also, please note that I edited the post you quoted; I feel I was being too harsh on Jarvan. Dips and Chin ups are good exercises, so are pushups - IF you know how to load them or make them more difficult in another way. Generally, getting stronger in the 5-10 rep range while eating a lot is the ticket.

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]AknurA wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]Jarvan wrote:
pull ups, dip, push ups, squats. get rid of all the other shit[/quote]

Right. Because deadlifts are so overrated for gaining size.

This may come across as a jibe against you personally but what it really is is frustration at the fact that a misinformed newbie starts a thread and, rather than telling him to do something that works, people start adding fluff.
Also, depending on what you mean when you say ‘squats’… unweighted, two-legged bodyweight squats are useless for gaining mass. There, I said it.
[/quote]

Agree with you about the undweighted squats.
However, was you serious that deadlifts are so overrated??? [/quote]

No. I was being sarcastic.
also, please note that I edited the post you quoted; I feel I was being too harsh on Jarvan. Dips and Chin ups are good exercises, so are pushups - IF you know how to load them or make them more difficult in another way. Generally, getting stronger in the 5-10 rep range while eating a lot is the ticket.
[/quote]

Okay, probably I will go with 5/3/1 or Ross Enamait’s “Never Gymless” he tells how to use/make difficult bodyweight exercises for strength for combat. After that, I might move on to 5/3/1 to build some muscle if Ross’s won’t give enough.