T Nation

Is My Squat Form Ok?


#1


Hi,


#2

Nice first post ... you wobble a bit half way up, but it looks like you're just correcting yourself. Doesn't look bad to me. Keep it up.


#3

Looks good to me.

You might want to get record a diffrent angle and post it up also though from the side for depth (looks good though.) A side angle would be better to see if your upperboddy archs forward too much also.


#4

It looked to me like you tried to straighten the back before the hips finished their drive

It ain't bad though, have you had any injuries or pain from it or something...?


#5

It's good, your ass should go out first, meaning you hips should bend before your knees.
i think..lol


#6

Thanks for the replies guys.

I have had no injuries from squatting.

As for my back straightening out first, I think it just appears that way because of my shorts. I lift my ass up as high as it goes then straitghten my back. Next time though I will try lift my hips up a lot more.

I normally lift lighter I was just testing that weight.

Thanks for replies.


#7

lookin good man. somtimes it helps to find a focal point on the ceiling or high wall and keep ur head up while looking at it.


#8

That looks like a good parallel depth squat.


#9

How many reps did you do? I counted over a hundred before i quit. [sarcasm]

I think Jereth127 and bluefingas have nailed your only issue in your hip drive was a little off. You did try to straighten the back before the hips finished their drive.

When you're coming up, push your hips through and keep your eyes on a fixed point to correct the back angle.

Don't get me wrong though. Your issue is not that severe and the form looks pretty good.


#10

Thanks BulletproofTiger

I only did 1 rep because its a lot heavier then I would normally squat.

Thanks for advice everyone.


#11

Bring your elbows forward it forces your back straight.


#12

nice man, i like it, your almost goin past parallel, whic is BEUTIFUL, not kidding lol.


#13

This does not seem like good advice to me.


#14

Why's that? It makes it easier (relatively speaking) to keep the chest up instead of falling down, which tends to happen at heavy weight, and engaging the lats as well. I mean hell, look at your avatar.

As far as it goes OP, I think your form is healthy. Healthy and optimal are not the same thing, but I don't think anybody here can really assess your form from that angle, except to spot gross errors and unhealthy movements. So, you look like you've got healthy squat form that will likely not cause any real problems. It's hard to tell how far forward your knees are traveling, but that is not necessarily a bad thing in the narrow stance squat. If you were squatting wide, it would be, but that's a different ballgame altogether.


#15

maybe we aren't thinking of the same thing. When I think of having elbows move forward I think it would be more difficult to maintain that same level of contraction in the upper back and shoulders. Also by moving elbows forward the weight will sit more in the hands rather than being jammed into the back.

I'll admit I've never tried this technique but I believe keeping elbows back will increase the contraction of the upper back assisting in maintaining spinal extension which in itself should help lift the chest.


#16

Moving your elbows forward will tighten your upper back and help keep your chest up.


#17

It would be good to see your feet in relation to your knees. But it looks alright to me.


#18

no its correct if he brings his elbows underneath the bar instead of behind it he can have a better shelf and lower the bar taking alot of pressure off the spine and imporving levrages and will help maintain a tight arch through the whole movement


#19

This is true. Elbows under the bar is the correct position. It is possible to keep your spine neutral without elbows under the bar, but it becomes much more difficult in that case.

Elbows under tha bar and eyes focused on a spot high on the wall/ceiling are just coaching tips that are used as a means to an end, with that end being proper position -- 1) Spine neutrality; 2) Weight properly aligned over your body... among others.

Although the slight changes that have been recomended may sound trivial, the adjustment(s) can have a huge impact on the lift and on the long term safety of the movement.


#20

Your form looks a lot like mine.

I feel that I need to sit back more on my heels to drive through. I plan on getting some proper shoes to help this.

Im also a bit shaky when using heavy loads.