T Nation

Is My Deadlift Form Good?


#1

Hi,

I've been deadlifting at home for almost 12 months now (within a split training for all bodyparts). I started out very, very light, watched lots of videos and read all the stuff I could find about proper deadlift form, avoiding hurting one's back, etc.

I've worked my weight up to some more serious poundage, and around a month or two ago I started experiencing this mild pain around middle spine. Not during the excercise but the day after and the next day sometimes. I'm not sure if the deadlift is the culprit (could be also the dumbbell squat maybe).

Anyway, my gf took this video of me doing DL with a very light bar, do you think the form is good or bad (terrible)? I was pretty sure I'm doing this okay but after seeing this video myself I am not so sure anymore.

Is my back arched too much in the very low part of the movement (as I pick the bar from the ground / lower it to touch the ground)?


#2

Looks OK on the way up, but you should be following the same path on the way back down. At some points it looks like you are doing two completely different movements when it should look like one.


#3

Dude, next time, tell your girlfriend to hold the camera the correct way.

Yes your back is arched too much. You've been deadlifting incorrectly for almost a year. Bend your knees more on the way down. Your leaning way too forward. It looks like you are doing Good Mornings on the way down. By the looks of that video I will say it is the deadlift that is giving you pain.


#4

You mean rounded? Not arched


#5

I agree, it doesn't look arched at all. Especially on the way down.


#6

Yeah, I guess I mean rounded, when "arched" means rounded in the other direction (inwards).

Well, it's tough to learn I've been doing it wrong. It's close to being my favorite movement of all. Should I try to correct it on my own, or better get social and ask a gym coach to help me out?

In other words, how likely am I to being able to correct my bad form on my own?


#7

Yeah, I guess I mean rounded, when "arched" means rounded in the other direction (inwards).

Well, it's tough to learn I've been doing it wrong. It's close to being my favorite movement of all. Should I try to correct it on my own, or better get social and ask a gym coach to help me out?

In other words, how likely am I to being able to correct my bad form on my own?

Double post, sorry


#8

Keep your chest up higher throughout the movement, and start looking forward or slightly up while staring at a fixed position as well. Your body will usually follow your head, and if it's looking down during the movement your body is gonna be heading down with it (leading to the rounding of the back).

Taking in a big breath of air and "bracing" the abs really helps me from rounding over when I deadlifts. Try doing that too.


#9

As Nate mentioned, your chest is so low that you look like youre about to run head first into the wall.
keep your chin up higher, (look straight ahead), and pull you shoulders back.
Arch that back and drive more with your hips.
Try lifting the bar from an elevated spot. The weights you are using are pretty tiny, hence you have to reach really low to pick up that bar.


#10

^^^^^ This.

Have you worked your deadlift strength up to 135lb? It's pretty hard for me personally to keep form deadlifting with less than 45lb plates.

You could always start with rack deadlifts until you build up enough strength. The form on those is pretty easy to keep.

Also, I taught myself how to deadlift from reading Eric Cressey's 3 article series "Mastering the deadlift"

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/mastering_the_deadlift_part_i

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/mastering_the_deadlift_part_ii

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/mastering_the_deadlift_part_iii


#11

Something that helped me as far as the upper body positioning was wall squats. Face a wall with feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart, and an inch or two from the wall and squat down without letting your knees or face touch the wall. It forces you to put your butt back and arch your back. I dont think your DL form has to be as extreme as that, but it teaches you what an arched back feels like, and you can transfer that you your deadlift.


#12

Why do you do a straight leg lowering phase? It would make sense to RDL up and down, or do squat stance up and down. Also, you bend over too much and round your back. Get your chest up and keep your back tight throughout the movement, and drive with your legs instead.


#13

it would of been more easier to view the clip horizontally then diagonally but it seems your back is a little bit arched

****remember when deadlifting keep your back straight look froward chest out


#14

Your back is rounding in the lumbar region at the very bottom of the movement because you are lifting from a deficit. But when the bar gets about mid shin where you'd be pulling normally from 45lb plates your alignment is pretty good. Take a look at those articles therajraj posted and if possible make another video later on either with something under the plates you have available to get the bar at a good or near height as if using 45lb plates


#15

I think you back should be more straight and hollow, which you can create by putting your shoulders more backwords, right now you are creating an injury, with the way your positioning your back.


#16

hips low, shoulders high, arms and back straight.