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Is it a Hernia?

Well, i think i got a hernia and it looks like all the gains that ive made so far on Mark’s SS will slowly desintegrade. I’ve had this slight pain right next to the lowest abdominal muscle for a while now but it wasn’t serious enough for me to go to the doctor.

Ithought it would go away after a while but it didnt so i decided to go to the family doc and he concluded that it might be lupus, tey did a few test on me too, this was all about a week ago.

Anyway bfore yesturday at work the pain started to get stronger and yesturday it got even stronger even my testicles would hurt. I have another appointment tomorrow to see what the test result say and to tell the doc that even my balls testicles hurt. I hope its nothing too serious bcuz if it is then it would be deppresing to lose all thats ive gained on my routine.

A hernia isn’t that big of a deal. Even if you go for the old fashioned surgery where they cut you open to fix it you’ll only be out for 6 weeks. I had one years ago in high school and it doesn’t affect me now. My grandfather had 6 and he still worked construction for most of his life.

Get them to put a mesh piece in there so you don’t re-injure yourself. I have one. Works great.

My buddy had them do both sides with mesh, even though he was herniated on one side, for prevention’s sake.

Do not have them do it laparoscopically if you are skinny. Risk is too high.

FS

Today i dont feel much pain since i took the day off from work but staying home w/o working out is making me feel like shit. Should i work out?

I had something similar I think. Doing rack pulls one day I got a warm/painful sensation in the same spot. It hurt for a couple weeks. I hate taking time off from the gym but I took a week off…and then was very careful not to stress that area for a while.

It finally went away but I would be careful if I were you. If it bothers you be careful in the gym. I know it sucks not working out but if you F&ck it up you will be in much worse shape.

Go to the doctor. Plain and simple. That’s the most important advice you will get in this thread.

[quote]Larfox wrote:
Go to the doctor. Plain and simple. That’s the most important advice you will get in this thread.[/quote]

quoted it just so you’d read it again.

They only get worse.

I just came back from the doc. and he couldnt determine what the problem was so i have to go back for a CT. Anyway when all this is over id like to start a new program one that emphasizes the arms more.

Im kinda tired of SS althought my squat is still goin up w/o any barriers, military press is a bitch though ive had to deload for the second time and i could only bench 5x3x2 w/ 255 on monday.

I could overcome that but like i said its kinda boring now. So what is a good program to work on after SS that also works ur arms more?

[quote]flightspeed wrote:
Get them to put a mesh piece in there so you don’t re-injure yourself. I have one. Works great.

My buddy had them do both sides with mesh, even though he was herniated on one side, for prevention’s sake.
[/quote]

I blew out my right side and had them mesh the left while they were at it.

I do all kinds of lifts to help build up my abs now so I do not have problems again in the future.

I was down for about 2 weeks from my surgery, doing simple things like standing were painful to near imposable for the first few days, by the 3rd week I felt mostly back to normal, and by the 4th week I went back to work but on a doctor restriction for lifting weight and bending over.

So its something like dog crap training a good routine to start ion after mark’s SS?

[quote]flightspeed wrote:
Get them to put a mesh piece in there so you don’t re-injure yourself. I have one. Works great.

My buddy had them do both sides with mesh, even though he was herniated on one side, for prevention’s sake.

Do not have them do it laparoscopically if you are skinny. Risk is too high.

FS

[/quote]

What’s the risk involved with being skinny and having it fixed laparoscopically? I actually had a double hernia fixed laparoscopically in high school as a 145lb wrestler, needless to say I was beyond skinny.

To the OP, DC is not something to start with after starting strength. I REPEAT DO NOT DO DC FOLLOWING STARTING STRENGTH.

[quote]B-Mac13 wrote:

What’s the risk involved with being skinny and having it fixed laparoscopically? I actually had a double hernia fixed laparoscopically in high school as a 145lb wrestler, needless to say I was beyond skinny.
[/quote]

This risk is this: when the surgeon inserts the Veress needle to inflate the abdomin, there isn’t a lot of depth if you don’t have much fat and there is a possibility that the doc will push through the fat and puncture the retroperitonium, leading to all sorts of complications. This can also happen when they insert the trochars.

I just got done deposing a surgeon in Rochester, NY that testified that anyone with less than 15% body fat shouldn’t have laparoscopic surgery. The surgery in question wasn’t a hernia repair, and an actual doctor might disagree with me.

But I defend cases where doctors get sued and we see this complication come up quite a bit.

Complications are rare, but they do happen and they are more likely with a skinny person.

Lemme tell you herniaguys a little secret; Go to a good chiropractor

A herniated disc is nothing but a disc that was compressed badly. For instance if L3 is twisted to the left and L4 is twisted to the right ( which is due to some chronic problem or an bad move or a fall) and if you do heavy deadlifts or such the disc gets compressed wrongly and so causes it to bulge out.

The truth is that EVERYBODY has some twists and mal-alignments in his spine ( that not always cause problems) but if you start doing sports you in fact make it worse than it once was. So don’t get surgery and take the problem by the roots; your spine So go and see the spinedoctor boys!

Let me know if you would want more information about the subject.

Erasmus

Erasmus, we’re talking about abdominal hernias, not herniated spinal discs.

flightspeed, I’m at a loss here. You argued against a doctor and proved that he is wrong… and now you’re saying he was right? Fundamentally wrong.

Also, if you’re going to inflate the abdominal cavity, you have to get inside the abdominal wall. It doesn’t matter how much fat is on the outside.

In fact, I would think it would be easier for a competent surgeon to perform laparoscopy on a patient with less than average subcutaneous fat, just because he would be able to more accurately feel the needle pierce the abdominal wall.

Am I right?

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
flightspeed, I’m at a loss here. You argued against a doctor and proved that he is wrong… and now you’re saying he was right? Fundamentally wrong.
[/quote]

I see your point, but there is an important distinction to be made.

I believe the expert witness in NY was wrong in his opinion that my client breached the standard of care when he did the surgery laparoscopically because my client’s decision met with the applicable guidelines for the indications at the time the surgery took place.

I do see his point (and totally agree with him) when he says that there are extra risks dealing with skinny or obese patients in laparoscopic procedures because of the variable subcutaneous fat layers. But, it doesn’t change the fact that my client didn’t breach the standard of care in place at the time of the injury.

To reiterate, laparoscopic surgery for skinny people doesn’t breach the standard (at least in the jurisdictions in which I argue) but I wouldn’t do it personally because there are higher risks.

You are right in terms of surface abdominal fat. I would expect a surgeon that is about to plunge a needle into a 6 pack to be able to more accurately gauge where the abdominal wall is.

Regardless, they go in through the bellybutton anyway, so surface fat isn’t that big of a deal, as the bellybutton is kind of a portal through the abdominal wall.

I’m talking about fat inside, under the muscle. I guess I wasn’t very specific before. Its actually fat and some connective tissue that separates the muscle from the abdominal cavity.

When people lose fat, this layer becomes extremely thin. The surgeons sometimes shove the needle right through this layer and then through the retroperitonium and sometimes into something important, which leads to death and lawsuits.

In no way am I trying to give an anatomy lesson. I don’t know shit about it, except for the stuff that I pick up because of my job, and if a healthcare professional tells you different, believe them.

All I am saying is that skinny people might want to think twice about laparoscopic procedures because in my line of work, we see a lot of complications with skinny folks and laparoscopy. Lots of problems with super fatties too.

But super fatties have complications with getting their fucking blood pressure checked, and should probably just skip going to the doctor and go to the gym.

Does that make sense?

Ok, so the surgeon was right, but it didn’t apply to your jurisdiction. I understand that… don’t really care for it, but I understand it.

I also understand that a thinner layer of visceral fat leaves the operating surgeon less room for error. At the same time, though, your level of subcutaneous fat is not necessarily an indication of your visceral fat level.

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
Ok, so the surgeon was right, but it didn’t apply to your jurisdiction. I understand that… don’t really care for it, but I understand it.
[/quote]

Well, no. The surgeon was wrong in my jurisdiction and probably all jurisdictions. Its not like the jurisdiction in which this case is filed is some kind of black hole where no one wins malpractice cases.

The guy was just wrong in his opinion about my client’s conduct because the reasoning he used doesn’t stand up to the applicable law. But, he’s saying it anyway so he can get his $400.00 per hour to testify.

OK. By “not necessarily,” you probably mean “99.9% of the time” and you’re banking on the .1% of cases to prove your point? I didn’t really know for sure so I googled it.

"According to researchers from Duke University Medical Center, exercise can significantly reduce the amount of visceral fat you carry around. The more exercise you do, the more of this type of dangerous fat you will lose.

Researchers in this study said that extra exercise can reverse the amount you have, while some moderate exercise can stop your visceral fat mounting up." http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/30641.php

So, exercise reduces subcutaneous fat and visceral fat. Seems like subcutaneous fat level would be a pretty good indicator of visceral fat level, although probably not a perfect indicator.

At any rate, if you don’t have much subcutaneous fat, there’s a pretty good chance you don’t have a lot of visceral fat. If you have low visceral fat, maybe you should avoid lap surgery.

Or, have your fucking teeth whitened laparoscopically. I don’t care.

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
Erasmus, we’re talking about abdominal hernias, not herniated spinal discs.

[/quote]

Damn you’re right
Guess I didn’t read too carefully huh.

[quote]flightspeed wrote:
Well, no. The surgeon was wrong [/quote]

Here lies the problem with lawyers. You argued against him in court, then you quoted his opinion as the truth on this forum, now you’re saying he’s wrong again. I don’t give a damn about all the legal bullshit… was he telling the truth or not? Is there really a higher risk of lap surgery for skinny people or not???

What is the incidence rate of the complications arising from skinny people having this type of surgery performed? And out of those cases, how many could we realistically chalk up to surgeons who are incompetent or just plain made a mistake?

[quote]
At any rate, if you don’t have much subcutaneous fat, there’s a pretty good chance you don’t have a lot of visceral fat. [/quote]

Again, not necessarily. There are other factors effecting visceral fat content. Like genetics, stress, extra-curricular hormone use… And if it was such a risk, they would use ultrasound to measure the visceral fat layer thickness in the surgery candidate. It takes only two minutes.

Google that.