T Nation

Is FEMA Worth Keeping?

"Why didnâ??t FEMA stockpile food, water, and gasoline? We had a weekâ??s notice to prepare for Sandy. There was no shortage of time. Did the government not realize that people needed to eat, drink, and drive?

All throughout America, we are asking these questions of our television sets as we watch the evolving story of human misery."

http://www.dickmorris.com/obama-hit-by-storm-backlash/

I say, fire them all. Turn it over to the individual states.

Because government is inherently inefficient and wasteful. The real question is why after 1000’s of years of evidence that show government is wasteful, inefficient, and oppressive, do people still think bigger government is the answer to their problem.

We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

Same here with the big flood in Nashville.

simple answer no and Romney was right by saying he would get rid of fema and put it in the hands of local government. Faster response times less money smaller government, too bad mslm and the facebookers want to say Romeny is an evil man who wants to take away fema and womens tampons

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

Your last sentence alone is the best campaign slogan if I ever heard one.

Great stuff man.

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

I agree with a lot of what you’re saying here, but there are disasters and then there are disasters. “Big people” can do wonders, and they are especially effective in circumstances like the one you described, but “we broke out the chainsaws after a few people were killed in a tornado” is not an argument against FEMA. It is impossible for a densely-populated urban community to respond to a catastrophic disaster in an adequate fashion without state and federal funds/assistance.

The folksy stories are fine, but they don’t scale up well when you’re talking about New Orleans 2005 or Haiti 2010. They just seem silly.

[quote]smh23 wrote:

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

I agree with a lot of what you’re saying here, but there are disasters and then there are disasters. “Big people” can do wonders, and they are especially effective in circumstances like the one you described, but “we broke out the chainsaws after a few people were killed in a tornado” is not an argument against FEMA. It is impossible for a densely-populated urban community to respond to a catastrophic disaster in an adequate fashion without state and federal funds/assistance.

The folksy stories are fine, but they don’t scale up well when you’re talking about New Orleans 2005 or Haiti 2010. They just seem silly.[/quote]
New Orleans 2005, Haiti 2010, and now New England 2012 are not arguments for FEMA. As usual, the idea looked good on paper and made for some uplifting rhetoric, but here in the real world it just falls flat when crunch time hits.

I’m not at all saying that there shouldn’t be some sort of state and local assistance, but Federal relief takes entirely too long to mobilize and coordinate. Beef up the agencies that can really make a difference and cut the dead weight.

[quote]JayPierce wrote:

[quote]smh23 wrote:

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

I agree with a lot of what you’re saying here, but there are disasters and then there are disasters. “Big people” can do wonders, and they are especially effective in circumstances like the one you described, but “we broke out the chainsaws after a few people were killed in a tornado” is not an argument against FEMA. It is impossible for a densely-populated urban community to respond to a catastrophic disaster in an adequate fashion without state and federal funds/assistance.

The folksy stories are fine, but they don’t scale up well when you’re talking about New Orleans 2005 or Haiti 2010. They just seem silly.[/quote]
New Orleans 2005, Haiti 2010, and now New England 2012 are not arguments for FEMA. As usual, the idea looked good on paper and made for some uplifting rhetoric, but here in the real world it just falls flat when crunch time hits.

I’m not at all saying that there shouldn’t be some sort of state and local assistance, but Federal relief takes entirely too long to mobilize and coordinate. Beef up the agencies that can really make a difference and cut the dead weight.[/quote]

I could get behind that. Though I will say that I’ve been spending about half my time in NYC since the hurricane and the emergency response personnel have been doing one hell of a job–and they’re using federal money.

Absolutely no doubt in my mind that those men and women up there are going way above and beyond to get it done. Those folks are the key. Get them resources as fast as possible and they will prevail.

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

Same here with the big flood in Nashville.[/quote]
Absolutely. I have never been so proud of my neighbors. If not for the gulf oil spill I believe the country could have seen a beautiful example of human generosity, charity, and goodwill.

[quote]JEATON wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
We had a tornado rip through our home town. I mean right down the middle. Killed a few people and I don’t know how much property damage was done. The people of our town and the surrounding area rolled up our sleeves, broke out the chainsaws, and went to work helping each other.

We had the situation well in hand before any government aid came into the picture. We don’t need big government, we need big people.[/quote]

Same here with the big flood in Nashville.[/quote]
Absolutely. I have never been so proud of my neighbors. If not for the gulf oil spill I believe the country could have seen a beautiful example of human generosity, charity, and goodwill.
[/quote]

Not that FEMA is perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but aren’t neighbors inherently closer and therefore able to help faster?

And it’s a bit of a sad statement that you are proud of your neighbors helping out. I mean, no shame in being grateful, but holy shit - if my neighbor was in need because of a storm (hurrah Queensland) I’d help them out despite barely interacting with them. Don’t parents teach their kids anything anymore?

lol This board is a prime example of small thinking(no offense). By small I don’t mean minds, I mean small town, small disasters, small economies, small everything.

Do you expect FEMA to rebuild a house tomorrow? Do you think they are here to fully stock gasoline? Fill up cars for family vacations? FEMA whether it works or not is necessary for the country. If it doesn’t work then it needs to be fixed not removed.

I am here I see the damage done, while there is a gas crisis I would say 95% of it is people that need gas for generators so they can watch 65" flat screens. Look at the pictures of lines, people are standing online with 5 gallon tanks, yes boilers also run off electricity but if your house was not lost you can wrap up. People had that problem long before 2012. Corporations are requiring their employees to come in to work even if they can work from home. FEMA is not going to consider your tv and emergency, not going to consider the fact that 1000 of your employees can work from home but you want them to spend gas in a crisis to get to work just because you’re a micro manager

This is not a tornado. I’ve been in some bad ones in Tennessee, saw nearly every window in Nashville blown out around 2001 sometime. Difference is 100x larger, this hurricane knocked out power for days to 5 states (more in sections), NJ can’t ask NY to come help. This isn’t everybody in your little town banding together to help each other. Small economy, if your town goes down the next town is fine. Every port on the north east was down for several days. How are you going to get all your chainsaws operating if the primary gas distribution centers and refineries as well as roads to bring up the gas are down. Now you compound that with people that lost houses, no local town government can support that. That’s what FEMA’s for. So that those people have somewhere to live 3 months later after everybody is back to normal and forgot about them. This is cut short due to my attention span but please try to imagine a much bigger disaster then my little home has a tree down in my bedroom. Think outside the box