T Nation

Is Fat Gain Proof?

I’ll give this my best shot to make this a reasonable question…

Assume that someone eats a relatively high protien diet (say 0.8g-1.0g protien/lb of body weight) If they are also gaining body fat, does that mean that their body is neccessarily getting all of the the calories needed to maximize muscle growth? This is of course also assuming that the person is busting their ass in the gym.

If this is the case, does it mean they should roll back their overall calories slightly (to stay in a surplus, just less of a surplus), or would doing so slow down their muscle gains?

The person is trying to maintain/gain a small amount of muscle over a long period of time and is not in a bonafied “bulk” phase.

I hope this isn’t too finicky of a question, hopefully it can start some good discussions.

Thanks.

Your post indicates your understanding of manipulation of diet is poor.

Have you ever read much on nutrition, specifically sports nutrition and exercise physiology?

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
Your post indicates your understanding of manipulation of diet is poor.

Have you ever read much on nutrition, specifically sports nutrition and exercise physiology?[/quote]

I’ve read some…not a whole lot. Was something I said incorrect? I feel like I understand the basics but not much more.

Are you able to answer the question?

If we’re comparing the same training, same hormonal condition, and same basic diet with the only thing changing being amount, then yes, a slow fat gain such as half a pound of fat per week IMO means that calories are as high as they should be for the goal you describe and when keeping those the same.

However, in many cases might well be that calories could beneficially be higher with no greater fat gain, or even with less fat gain, by changing one or more of those things.

Avoiding any fat gain at all, even a slow rate, tends to slow muscle gain compared to allowing a slow fat gain.