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Is Doing Lunges to 90 Degrees Necessary?

Hey I was just wondering about the form, is doing 90 deg. lunges necessary for quad development or can I just keep my lunging leg slightly above 90 degrees as long as the knee from my other leg hits the ground?? Reason I’m asking is because everytime I try to lunge I can never get to a 90 degree position due to the fact that my other knee always lands on the ground first, causing my lunged leg to just be above 90 degrees.

[quote]WWEAttitude wrote:
Reason I’m asking is because everytime I try to lunge I can never get to a 90 degree position due to the fact that my other knee always lands on the ground first, causing my lunged leg to just be above 90 degrees.[/quote]

How far above 90 degrees? (it can’t be much)… You must have an unusually long femur.

You ever tried doing lunges with one leg on a bench ?

Anyways i don’t think it makes much of a difference as long as you feel it in the targeted muscle. On occasions i do partials on leg press just to keep tension on my quads throughout the entire set.

Take a longer step for your lunge if you want 90 degrees.

Reverse lunges w/ deficit: Start by standing on a small box or step, step off the box behind you. The step increases ROM and allows you to get to greater depth. Very challenging single leg exercise imo.

I front squat ATG first exercise then deliberately do short ROM (90 - 110 degrees) lunges at the moment to focus on my quads. As long as your hitting your glutes on other exercises or foucsing on a weak link i think its fine.

[quote]Wapptor wrote:
Reverse lunges w/ deficit: Start by standing on a small box or step, step off the box behind you. The step increases ROM and allows you to get to greater depth. Very challenging single leg exercise imo.[/quote]

This is exactly how i do Lunges.

90 degrees? That would be more of a split squat. Calf to hamstring = Lunge (yes, the dreaded knee past the toe). Just semantics. Try lunging like above but with your front foot on a riser. Most people lack the ankle flexibility to go calf to hamstring without a riser on their front foot.

Alan