T Nation

Iodine in 'Food'


#1

Do packaged foods like soy sauce use iodized salt? Would it be best to assume they do?


#2

Well, iodized salt costs more, so I would assume not… also, from the Salt institute:

[quote]
Salt used in processed foods is not iodized. Given that people are cooking less at home and buying either restaurant or processed foods, iodine intakes in the U.S. have declined from about 250 μg/day to 157 micrograms/day. [/quote]


#3

[quote]1 Man Island wrote:
Well, iodized salt costs more, so I would assume not… also, from the Salt institute:

[quote]
Salt used in processed foods is not iodized. Given that people are cooking less at home and buying either restaurant or processed foods, iodine intakes in the U.S. have declined from about 250 μg/day to 157 micrograms/day. [/quote][/quote]

I don’t think there is a reliable source on it, but I’d agree with 1man Island, follow the money. Iodine supplements are pretty inexpensive, or just buy and use iodized salt.


#4

A lot of food manufacturers here in Europe will go so far as to specify that they use non-iodized salt in their products, so I can’t assume it’s any different than in the States.

The iodine/vitamin D mix from life extension is a good option, kills two birds with one stone IMO.


#5

[quote]kgildner wrote:
A lot of food manufacturers here in Europe will go so far as to specify that they use non-iodized salt in their products, so I can’t assume it’s any different than in the States.

The iodine/vitamin D mix from life extension is a good option, kills two birds with one stone IMO.[/quote]
I take the same product, but the one with vitamin K.