T Nation

Intra-Workout Shakes


#1

Hello Bill

would i like to know your opinion about peri workout shakes and what do you recommend?how much protein and carbs per kilo with shakes?


#2

Not Bill, but get as much in as budget/digestion allows


#3

THanks, RampantBadger!

Pretty much the same here.

I use Plazma and/or MAG-10.

For me, Plazma is for intensive workouts that will burn similar energy to what’s contained in the drink. For me, 113 g of carbs (three scoops) is very suitable for intensive training.

However, if for whatever reason the training is lighter in workload or it’s endurance type exercise (no muscle gain possible) and I’d rather save generous carb intake for another time, I’ll substitute partly or entirely with MAG-10.

Basically I follow label recommendations, except for that aspect of adjusting use according to the amount of carbs I think suits what I’m doing.

This includes having a portion before, most during, and either some of the same drink afterwards, or a MAG-10 afterwards.

Over the years I’ve also been a fan of Surge Recovery by itself or in combination with MAG-10, but since the release of Plazma I haven’t used it much. It’s still good, and great value for the price, but Plazma is better.


#4

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
THanks, RampantBadger!

Pretty much the same here.

I use Plazma and/or MAG-10.

For me, Plazma is for intensive workouts that will burn similar energy to what’s contained in the drink. For me, 113 g of carbs (three scoops) is very suitable for intensive training.

However, if for whatever reason the training is lighter in workload or it’s endurance type exercise (no muscle gain possible) and I’d rather save generous carb intake for another time, I’ll substitute partly or entirely with MAG-10.

Basically I follow label recommendations, except for that aspect of adjusting use according to the amount of carbs I think suits what I’m doing.

This includes having a portion before, most during, and either some of the same drink afterwards, or a MAG-10 afterwards.

Over the years I’ve also been a fan of Surge Recovery by itself or in combination with MAG-10, but since the release of Plazma I haven’t used it much. It’s still good, and great value for the price, but Plazma is better.[/quote]

what are the differences among HBCD,VITARGO AND WAXY MAIZE?


#5

The main practical factors involved with these carbs are osmolality in solution (a property that affects absorption of water and bloating) and rate of absorption of carbohydrate.

Osmolality is a property of a solution that depends on how many molecules are dissolved per liter. When this number is similar to the number in blood plasma (isotonic), water absorption or rate of hydration is optimized. When it’s much higher, hydration is much slower, and bloat can result.

So for example, before Anaconda I had found that I achieved best results with about 100 g of carbs in my pre-and-during workout nutrition, but I used glucose. Rate of water absorption was slow because of the high osmolality, and I had noticeable bloat until finally the water was absorbed. This doesn’t happen with the above carbs. Each molecule of the complex carbs contains many glucose units, for any given amount of total glucose contained, the number of molecules is far less. Osmolality is lower, and rate of water being absorbed is much better.

HBCD provides low osmolality and very fast absorption of both water, assuming the rest of the formula allows an about-isotonic solution, and glucose.

Waxy maize provides low osmolality but much slower absorption of glucose.

Vitargo might be considered an earlier generation of HBCD. It also features low osmolality and fast glucose uptake, but has a different structure which could explain performing differently. At least for the context of combining with casein hydrolysate and taking more pre and during workout than post, HBCD performed better, but for a product to put in drinks mixed personally for use during the day etc, Vitargo has low osmolality and absorbs quickly. Though usually for use during the day, neither point is key, and the second might even be a little disadvantageous compared to slower release.


#6

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
The main practical factors involved with these carbs are osmolality in solution (a property that affects absorption of water and bloating) and rate of absorption of carbohydrate.

Osmolality is a property of a solution that depends on how many molecules are dissolved per liter. When this number is similar to the number in blood plasma (isotonic), water absorption or rate of hydration is optimized. When it’s much higher, hydration is much slower, and bloat can result.

So for example, before Anaconda I had found that I achieved best results with about 100 g of carbs in my pre-and-during workout nutrition, but I used glucose. Rate of water absorption was slow because of the high osmolality, and I had noticeable bloat until finally the water was absorbed. This doesn’t happen with the above carbs. Each molecule of the complex carbs contains many glucose units, for any given amount of total glucose contained, the number of molecules is far less. Osmolality is lower, and rate of water being absorbed is much better.

HBCD provides low osmolality and very fast absorption of both water, assuming the rest of the formula allows an about-isotonic solution, and glucose.

Waxy maize provides low osmolality but much slower absorption of glucose.

Vitargo might be considered an earlier generation of HBCD. It also features low osmolality and fast glucose uptake, but has a different structure which could explain performing differently. At least for the context of combining with casein hydrolysate and taking more pre and during workout than post, HBCD performed better, but for a product to put in drinks mixed personally for use during the day etc, Vitargo has low osmolality and absorbs quickly. Though usually for use during the day, neither point is key, and the second might even be a little disadvantageous compared to slower release.

[/quote]

Is waxy maize a complex carbohydrate?
what is the glycemic index of dextrose, maltodextrin,vitargo, waxy maize and hbcd?


#7

If using the definition, as some do, that a “complex carbohydrate” is any carbohydrate made up of 3 or more saccharide (sugar) units, then waxy maize is a complex carb. I’m not at all sure that classifying it that way helps understanding or decisions, though.

Dextrose (glucose) has a GI of 100; maltodextrin varies because there are many different maltodextrins. There are no published numbers I know of for HBCD or Vitargo; the latter claims “more than maltodextrin” but no more specific than that.

Glycemic index can be a lacking measure as measured results have a lot to do with concentration of the mixed solution and stomach emptying rate as well as other materials present, rather than being an intrinstic property of the substance.