T Nation

Intervals Over Steady State

Now before you read the article I wrote, I’m sure someone’s going to have something to say about it. So let’s just get this out of the way.

Steady-state cardio has its place if you’re training for a marathon the tour de france, or any other long distance race. Sure you’ll have to do endurance runs at a steady-state. If you’re old and have heart problems or joint issues, then maybe you can’t handle sprinting or intervals.

BUT, if you’re doing cardio for one of the main reasons it’s done, FAT LOSS, then steady-state cardio is obsolete. It doesn’t promote as much fat loss and you risk burning up your muscle. Intervals will burn the fat off you faster and let you keep your meat!

Enjoy:

[quote]Bendo13 wrote:
BUT, if you’re doing cardio for one of the main reasons it’s done, FAT LOSS, then steady-state cardio is obsolete. It doesn’t promote as much fat loss and you risk burning up your muscle. Intervals will burn the fat off you faster and let you keep your meat!

Enjoy:
http://hubpages.com/_Bendo13/hub/Interval_Training__Steady-State_Cardio_is_Obsolete[/quote]

If your general statement is that more people should do interval training than steady state training to lose weight, I agree with you. But you are using a pretty big brush to say steady state is obsolete. Low to moderate intensity steady state training burns a large percentage of fat, burns almost no muscle, often helps with recovery and does not really add to the training stress. So in some situations (like a bodybuilder or powerlifter, someone working very hard with the weights plus someone that needs to do cardio to lose weight and is probably on a diet) steady state is the answer.

How many bodybuilders do you know that use interval training as their main method of fat loss? Interval training is great but it can easily burn muscle combined with a reduced calorie diet and intense weight training and it generally adds to the training stress. Also you can do fasted steady state in the morning for enhanced effects, but fasted interval training would be a bad idea on multiple levels. Again, I agree with you in general but disagreed with some of the specifics.

Stop posting.

And if you are going to post, do it in the right forum.

You suck.

[quote]Tim Henriques wrote:
Bendo13 wrote:
BUT, if you’re doing cardio for one of the main reasons it’s done, FAT LOSS, then steady-state cardio is obsolete. It doesn’t promote as much fat loss and you risk burning up your muscle. Intervals will burn the fat off you faster and let you keep your meat!

Enjoy:

If your general statement is that more people should do interval training than steady state training to lose weight, I agree with you. But you are using a pretty big brush to say steady state is obsolete.

Low to moderate intensity steady state training burns a large percentage of fat, burns almost no muscle, often helps with recovery and does not really add to the training stress. So in some situations (like a bodybuilder or powerlifter, someone working very hard with the weights plus someone that needs to do cardio to lose weight and is probably on a diet) steady state is the answer.

How many bodybuilders do you know that use interval training as their main method of fat loss? Interval training is great but it can easily burn muscle combined with a reduced calorie diet and intense weight training and it generally adds to the training stress.

Also you can do fasted steady state in the morning for enhanced effects, but fasted interval training would be a bad idea on multiple levels. Again, I agree with you in general but disagreed with some of the specifics.[/quote]

Yeah i can see that intervals might overtrain your legs since they’re going to fire up more of your type II fibers and I have heard that more bodybuilders do steady-state that’s why I mentioned at first that it does has its place. But long distances have been proven to be catabolic, there’s actually a few articles on T-Nation about that.

But I disagree that interval training will burn muscle unless your intervals are really long or you go a distance too long overall… you’re using shorts bursts as opposed to long drawn out steady pace… it’s actually been proven at times to do the opposite, and make you gain muscle. But yes, if you’re doing enough in the gym, it’ll lead to overtraining.

I’ve read about benefits, to next to no benefits to fasted state cardio… it’s either or depends on where you look, but I have done it myself. It can be beneficial.

Alwyn Cosgrove, Chad Waterbury, Christian Thibaudeau, Craig Ballantyne and others stand behind intervals and I do too… It does promote fat loss more in my own personal experience and my legs and the rest of my body are way stronger than they were in the past so I’m not seeing the muscle loss.

But with limiting your calories it all has to do with how much you’re going to burn up during your cardio and through out the day because of your cardio and the other things you do. If you end up doing too much and don’t raise your calories, then yeah you can’t keep your muscle.

But the cardio itself burning up your muscle as you do it? I haven’t heard anything like that. But I have read on this site and others that running for long distances at a steady pace will become catabolic.

This was more so to get everyday people to stop jogging/walking for hours on end on the treadmill. But it has its place if done right.