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Interval Training Question

My girlfriend is looking to do some interval training on her days away from weights. She trains weights 3X a week, full body. Her ultimate goal is fatloss.

I’ve read “The Heirarchy of Fatloss”, and I don’t understand how you can implement high intensity ANaerobic interval training without interfering with recovery.

Would high intensity aerobic training be better than the ANaerobic counterpart?
What is the difference in how they are performed?
Any other suggestions?

anaerobic training differs from aerobic endurance training in that when you train aerobically you’re burning fatty acids for energy. Anaerobic relies on different energy sources depending on the legnth of this intense, short bout of exercise. Anaerobic will help to burn carbohydrate, and carbohydrate stores (glycogen)…- i believe. if anyone has better advice theres nothing wrong with more than one opinion

[quote]bulletproof_ wrote:
I’ve read “The Heirarchy of Fatloss”, and I don’t understand how you can implement high intensity ANaerobic interval training without interfering with recovery.[/quote]

This is exactly right. Finally someone is thinking for himself and realizing this.

Most people who say they are doing “anaerobic training” or “HIIT” really aren’t. What they are really doing is interval-based aerobic activity. Basically, “hard” but not “all out” intervals.

There is no way to explain this really. You just have to experiment with it and find your limits. But generally, if you are doing HIIT, at the end of an interval, you literally don’t have any gas left… You can’t run anymore and if you tried, you would likely fall down.

After running a hard interval, while you are tired and breathing heavy, you could still go a few more seconds without falling flat on your face.

Another way of looking at it… Hard HIIT training, if done correctly, will take you to lactic-acid threshold. This means you will literally start dry heaving (if you have an empty stomach) or puking, as your body will product more lactic acid than your system can clear.

After doing a hard aerobic interval, you won’t feel this way. You might even have a “runner’s high.” Don’t get me wrong, you’ll be tired. But being a little flushed is quite different from holding yourself up by holding your knees and gagging.

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
bulletproof_ wrote:
I’ve read “The Heirarchy of Fatloss”, and I don’t understand how you can implement high intensity ANaerobic interval training without interfering with recovery.

This is exactly right. Finally someone is thinking for himself and realizing this.

Most people who say they are doing “anaerobic training” or “HIIT” really aren’t. What they are really doing is interval-based aerobic activity. Basically, “hard” but not “all out” intervals.

There is no way to explain this really. You just have to experiment with it and find your limits. But generally, if you are doing HIIT, at the end of an interval, you literally don’t have any gas left… You can’t run anymore and if you tried, you would likely fall down.

After running a hard interval, while you are tired and breathing heavy, you could still go a few more seconds without falling flat on your face.

Another way of looking at it… Hard HIIT training, if done correctly, will take you to lactic-acid threshold. This means you will literally start dry heaving (if you have an empty stomach) or puking, as your body will product more lactic acid than your system can clear.

After doing a hard aerobic interval, you won’t feel this way. You might even have a “runner’s high.” Don’t get me wrong, you’ll be tired. But being a little flushed is quite different from holding yourself up by holding your knees and gagging.[/quote]

So basically, the difference in how they are performed is that anaerobic interval training is a balls-out sprint and an aerobic one is more like a jog?