T Nation

Interesting Vid

no idea whats going on here, but if someone could explain it to me that’d be great…

description is:

how to train no-motion punch! �??�?��?��?�??�?��?��??�?��?�

no idea what I was watching, but it was awesome. we would learn a block like that in my ninjitsu training, but I couldn’t tell if the additional punches the teacher were throwing were a part of the techniques he was teaching or if he was just too fast for the other guy.

the block concept is just basic aikdo / judo / bjj whatever concept of using force redirection. but he was darn good at it. the whole no-motion punch refers maybe to the additional punches he was throwing, they seemed rather unorthodox to me, but I’ve never studied a hand heavy striking art, so I dunno. (TKD/Ninjitsu here).

i think it had something to do with the fact that his punches weren’t telegraphed maybe

where do you learn ninjutsu? your locatin says california and i know USC used to (still does?) have a frank dux academy

and check out the rest of the videos guys…some interesting stuff there

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
no idea whats going on here, but if someone could explain it to me that’d be great…

description is:

how to train no-motion punch! �??�?��?��?�??�?��?��??�?��?�[/quote]

I think the idea is that when you punch, your body prepares in a certain way. Like if i watch someone, and they’re running and suddenly (for a split second) their hands move back, arms become straight, head and neck move slightly forward and down, the trunk curves and the knees bend…i can predict the guy is about to jump.

The idea of “no motion” is probably this lack of “body involvement”. The punch just flows out and there is no thought. Your body doesnt twist or gear up for it. All that happens is the shoulder/tricep involment, which is too subtle to really notice.

This is great for speed and catching someone off guard but it probably lacks alot of power. I could see it work well for kicks however. Interesting to say the least.

“How to get high speed”:

I need to improve my japanese but in this one he’s talking about efficiency of motion.

“how to kick inside high kick! karate champ,masashi watanabe”:

“this is a scene of fighter’s rehabilitation.kick boxing champ gracyer aki trains high kick like this.it looks slow,but very good to make inner muscles strong.”

I no longer train any MA, but I was training ninjitsu at the Seattle Budokan in Washington.

It was a good school, 10$ a class, 8$ if ya paid for a month. Payment was basically on the honor system and classes were in an aikido studio we rented after hours. I never had any interest in weapon training so I can’t speak to that, but the taijitsu was good. We primarily learned standing locks (cop / special forces type stuff) and breaks along with weight manipulation (think judo only a lot less of it). For striking, coming from a TKD background, I found the strikes to be too laborious, too much full body movement required to attack and too many “moves” used to stop attackers from attacking that I find no real use for in the real world. Such as punching someone in the armpit/shoulder area to halt their incoming punch and so forth.

Kick wise, I found their kicks to ee again too laborious, their “front” kick, instead of stabbbing out like in TKD, or thrusting out / up like you might see a kickboxer / or even a karate guy do, it was a push using the whole body’s weight to move thru the opponent. Useful if pulled off, but was seemingly cooler in theory than in real life. Our ground game was much like a simplified version of what you see in the MMA bjj game. But with a few more complicated movements that seem to require a fair bit of mastery and dare I say luck to pull off in a real fight.

In fact I would put the majority of what I learned there into the categories of either "too complicated, IE requiring a lot of training time under your belt to use effectively, BUT definitely work, (this holds true for their stand up lock / break game) or "too complicated to find any practical application, (this applying to their ground / striking game.) I would put up any dime store black belt from the local McDojo TKD / Karate school vs a Ninjitsu Blackbelt in a striking match. And if you want to learn a ground game go to a jj school.

But I went there for the ukemi, for the cost / the people, the teacher, the like mindedness of the students and why they wanted to learn an MA. Some great seminars, from some big names, as well as from other disciplines etc etc. I didn’t go there to learn to kick butt or fight in MMA.

Sorry this became long, hope it helps / answers some questions.

[quote]JohnnyNinja wrote:
I no longer train any MA, but I was training ninjitsu at the Seattle Budokan in Washington.

It was a good school, 10$ a class, 8$ if ya paid for a month. Payment was basically on the honor system and classes were in an aikido studio we rented after hours. I never had any interest in weapon training so I can’t speak to that, but the taijitsu was good. We primarily learned standing locks (cop / special forces type stuff) and breaks along with weight manipulation (think judo only a lot less of it). For striking, coming from a TKD background, I found the strikes to be too laborious, too much full body movement required to attack and too many “moves” used to stop attackers from attacking that I find no real use for in the real world. Such as punching someone in the armpit/shoulder area to halt their incoming punch and so forth.

Kick wise, I found their kicks to ee again too laborious, their “front” kick, instead of stabbbing out like in TKD, or thrusting out / up like you might see a kickboxer / or even a karate guy do, it was a push using the whole body’s weight to move thru the opponent. Useful if pulled off, but was seemingly cooler in theory than in real life. Our ground game was much like a simplified version of what you see in the MMA bjj game. But with a few more complicated movements that seem to require a fair bit of mastery and dare I say luck to pull off in a real fight.

In fact I would put the majority of what I learned there into the categories of either "too complicated, IE requiring a lot of training time under your belt to use effectively, BUT definitely work, (this holds true for their stand up lock / break game) or "too complicated to find any practical application, (this applying to their ground / striking game.) I would put up any dime store black belt from the local McDojo TKD / Karate school vs a Ninjitsu Blackbelt in a striking match. And if you want to learn a ground game go to a jj school.

But I went there for the ukemi, for the cost / the people, the teacher, the like mindedness of the students and why they wanted to learn an MA. Some great seminars, from some big names, as well as from other disciplines etc etc. I didn’t go there to learn to kick butt or fight in MMA.

Sorry this became long, hope it helps / answers some questions.
[/quote]

What in the fuck are you talking about?

It wasn’t clear? I suppose I was rambling.