T Nation

Interesting Study on Two NSAIDs

Really interesting read: http://www.physorg.com/news126711822.html

Taking daily recommended dosages of ibuprofen and acetaminophen caused a substantially greater increase over placebo in the amount of quadriceps muscle mass and muscle strength gained during three months of regular weight lifting, in a study by physiologists at the Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University.

Dr. Chad Carroll, a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Todd Trappe, reported study results at Experimental Biology 2008 in San Diego on April 6. His presentation was part of the scientific program of the American Physiological Society (APS).

Thirty-six men and women, between 60 and 78 years of age (average age 65), were randomly assigned to daily dosages of either ibuprofen (such as that in Advil), acetaminophen (such as that in Tylenol), or a placebo. The dosages were identical to those recommended by the manufacturers and were selected to most closely mimic what chronic users of these medicines were likely to be taking. Neither the volunteers nor the scientists knew who was receiving which treatment until the end of the study.

All subjects participated in three months of weight training, 15-20 minute sessions conducted in the Human Performance Laboratory three times per week. The researchers knew from their own and other studies that training at this intensity and for this time period would significantly increase muscle mass and strength. They expected the placebo group to show such increases, as its members did, but they were surprised to find that the groups using either ibuprofen or acetaminophen did even better. An earlier study from the laboratory, measuring muscle metabolism (or more precisely, muscle protein synthesis, the mechanism through which new protein is added to muscle), had looked at changes over a 24 hour period. This �??acute�?? study found that both ibuprofen and acetaminophen had a negative impact, by blocking a specific enzyme cyclooxygenase, commonly referred to as COX.

But that study looked at only one day. Over three months, says Dr. Trappe, the chronic consumption of ibuprofen or acetaminophen during resistance training appears to have induced intramuscular changes that enhance the metabolic response to resistance exercise, allowing the body to add substantially more new protein to muscle.

The amount of change was measured in quadricep muscles using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the gold standard for determining muscle mass. The researchers now are conducting assays of muscle biopsies taken before and after the three-month period of resistance training, in order to understand the metabolic mechanism of the positive effects of ibuprofen and acetaminophen.

One of the foci of Ball State�??s Human Performance Laboratory is the adaptation of the elderly to exercise. Another is the loss of muscle mass that takes place when astronauts are exposed to long-term weightlessness. This work has implications for both groups, says Dr. Trappe.

Source: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Now that’s interesting. Cool find.

cuebal

[quote]denv23 wrote:

the chronic consumption of ibuprofen or acetaminophen during resistance training appears to have induced intramuscular changes that enhance the metabolic response to resistance exercise, allowing the body to add substantially more new protein to muscle.

[/quote]

that seems like quite a leap in analysis…

what is the adage about the simplest answer?
70 year old men taking nsaids everyday while embarking on a weight training program…hmmm…which group you think had less aches and pains, less joint discomfort, thereby allowing an extra degree of effort? NSAID or PLACEBO?

[quote]BJ* wrote:
denv23 wrote:

the chronic consumption of ibuprofen or acetaminophen during resistance training appears to have induced intramuscular changes that enhance the metabolic response to resistance exercise, allowing the body to add substantially more new protein to muscle.

that seems like quite a leap in analysis…

what is the adage about the simplest answer?
70 year old men taking nsaids everyday while embarking on a weight training program…hmmm…which group you think had less aches and pains, less joint discomfort, thereby allowing an extra degree of effort? NSAID or PLACEBO?

[/quote]

Exactly, a study at that age would feel like the results point to more training effort, and even more hypertrophy from daily activities that would promote recovery, bloodflow, and maybe have a slight hypertrophy effect in and elder and less active population.

Why do they always do studies on the elderly, diseased, or somehow sub-healthy? I mean, fuck, I’m sure anyone here would happily agree to be part of an exercise/diet related study.

This is starting to piss me off in a big way.

this is odd because this study
http://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/282/3/E551
shows that NSAIDS Reduce protein synthesis after training

[quote]Brant_Drake wrote:
Why do they always do studies on the elderly, diseased, or somehow sub-healthy? I mean, fuck, I’m sure anyone here would happily agree to be part of an exercise/diet related study.

This is starting to piss me off in a big way.[/quote]

They’re probably able to obtain funding (from federal sources at least) easier by using samples of diseased, elderly folks, etc. For example, the government may not find the idea of researching muscle gains in the average American very worthy of throwing money at. But, if a grant writer is clever and good at what he does, he’ll be able to spin it so that he’s doing the same study, but with an elderly sample, playing it off as investigating health in the elderly.

I have actually heard that NSAID’s reduce muscle growth.

Joe

[quote]Joe Brook wrote:
I have actually heard that NSAID’s reduce muscle growth.

Joe[/quote]

Maybe it was this study they referred too?

From the article above:"An earlier study from the laboratory, measuring muscle metabolism (or more precisely, muscle protein synthesis, the mechanism through which new protein is added to muscle), had looked at changes over a 24 hour period. This �??acute�?? study found that both ibuprofen and acetaminophen had a negative impact, by blocking a specific enzyme cyclooxygenase, commonly referred to as COX.

But that study looked at only one day. Over three months, says Dr. Trappe, the chronic consumption of ibuprofen or acetaminophen during resistance training appears to have induced intramuscular changes that enhance the metabolic response to resistance exercise, allowing the body to add substantially more new protein to muscle."

I’m not backing the study or the claims, just thought maybe the study you are thinking of was this one cited. I would agree with other posters that being elderly does skew it for younger trainees. Especially due to reduced pain and increased blood flow.

cueball

[quote]cueball wrote:
Joe Brook wrote:
I have actually heard that NSAID’s reduce muscle growth.

Joe

Maybe it was this study they referred too?

From the article above:"An earlier study from the laboratory, measuring muscle metabolism (or more precisely, muscle protein synthesis, the mechanism through which new protein is added to muscle), had looked at changes over a 24 hour period. This �??acute�?? study found that both ibuprofen and acetaminophen had a negative impact, by blocking a specific enzyme cyclooxygenase, commonly referred to as COX.

But that study looked at only one day. Over three months, says Dr. Trappe, the chronic consumption of ibuprofen or acetaminophen during resistance training appears to have induced intramuscular changes that enhance the metabolic response to resistance exercise, allowing the body to add substantially more new protein to muscle."

I’m not backing the study or the claims, just thought maybe the study you are thinking of was this one cited. I would agree with other posters that being elderly does skew it for younger trainees. Especially due to reduced pain and increased blood flow.

cueball[/quote]

OH Yeah! Probably! Interesting.

Joe

[quote]Brant_Drake wrote:
Why do they always do studies on the elderly, diseased, or somehow sub-healthy? I mean, fuck, I’m sure anyone here would happily agree to be part of an exercise/diet related study.

This is starting to piss me off in a big way.[/quote]

Probably because studies are conducted by doctors, who are trying to help “elderly, diseased, or somehow sub-healthy” people. Im pretty sure most doctors are more interested in helping an elderly person regain some daily functions, than they are in helping the small percent of people interested in body builidy.

Not an attack, just seemed like a question with an obvious answer.