T Nation

Insulin and Total Calories

I have been told that a lot of high GI foods taken at all hours of the day definitely isn’t a good thing as it relates to body composition. What I don’t understand is how this relates with total caloric consumption. For example, say your maintenance is 3000 kcal/day and you eat that much in high GI carbs and protein. I am guessing you wouldn’t gain any weight as that is your maintenance, right? Say you ate 3300kcal/day of high GI carbs and protein as opposed to an anabolic diet with high fat/low carb. Would the person on the high GI carb diet gain more fat/muscle than the high fat/low carb person. Isn’t all that matters total caloric consumption.
Is the purpose of insulin control only for appetite suppression?

energy balance = (calorie intake * absorption rate) - calorie expenditure

The key is the absorption rate. While calories ARE king, they’re not the only issue. Pick a person with a 3000 calorie maintenance level and try three diets:

  1. All protein, client will lose weight

  2. Mixed, client will stay steady

  3. All sugar, client will gain weight

Despite all three being at maintenance, the effects are different.

3000 Calories of Donuts ARE NOT the same as 3000 Calories of Steak.

You’re kind of asking two different questions here.

To first answer the question at the very end of your post, no insulin control is not only for appetite suppression. While that is part of it, another purpose served is preventing insulin resistance and the onset of type II diabetes.

While being “overly fat” (I use that term very loosely here) is a contributing factor in type II diabetes, it is not the only one. There are still “skinny” people out there who develop it.

As for the ratio of fat to muscle gained on the two diets you list, that will likely differ based on genetics more than any other factor. Some people react differently to high carb diets than others, the same with high fat diets. Trial and error is about the only way you can know for sure.

Yes but is that from the TEF, insulin, or both?

[quote]blue9steel wrote:
energy balance = (calorie intake * absorption rate) - calorie expenditure

The key is the absorption rate. While calories ARE king, they’re not the only issue. Pick a person with a 3000 calorie maintenance level and try three diets:

  1. All protein, client will lose weight

  2. Mixed, client will stay steady

  3. All sugar, client will gain weight

Despite all three being at maintenance, the effects are different.

3000 Calories of Donuts ARE NOT the same as 3000 Calories of Steak.[/quote]

This is from the TEF, not insulin, right?

[quote]markdp wrote:
blue9steel wrote:
energy balance = (calorie intake * absorption rate) - calorie expenditure

The key is the absorption rate. While calories ARE king, they’re not the only issue. Pick a person with a 3000 calorie maintenance level and try three diets:

  1. All protein, client will lose weight

  2. Mixed, client will stay steady

  3. All sugar, client will gain weight

Despite all three being at maintenance, the effects are different.

3000 Calories of Donuts ARE NOT the same as 3000 Calories of Steak.

This is from the TEF, not insulin, right?[/quote]

Man, you are just trying to oversimplify things way too much. No single mechanism is responsible for any major physiological processes in the body. The human body is a highly complex, synergistic machine.

Maybe a better way to go about this is to ask you: Why do you care? Or, more directly, what exactly are you trying to achieve? Are you just curious? Are you trying to justify eating lots of high GI carbs to gain weight? Or is it something else entirely?

[quote]blue9steel wrote:
energy balance = (calorie intake * absorption rate) - calorie expenditure

3000 Calories of Donuts ARE NOT the same as 3000 Calories of Steak.[/quote]

Source, article, evidence?

Do you really need a source to tell you that a 300 calorie doughnut will not affect your body the same way a 300 calorie steak will? all you need is the nutritional information which is common knowledge

[quote]Phate89 wrote:
blue9steel wrote:
energy balance = (calorie intake * absorption rate) - calorie expenditure

3000 Calories of Donuts ARE NOT the same as 3000 Calories of Steak.

Source, article, evidence?[/quote]

The TEF alone would make this true and that have been extensively studies and written about. A doughnut is loaded with calories and take little to no energy to digest and process. Then the steak is well MEAT very energy expensive to process Hell just the chewing alone would make the steak win out. Then were talking about the amino acids, the minerals and vitamins in the meat as opposed to the doughnut

yada yada.

Back to the original question, a problem you have to consider with the HIGH GI diet of 3000 cals, vs the say Anabolic diet of 3000 cals without even worrying about he macro break down is the speed at which the HIGH GI stuff is digested and stored. You body would be in a constant state of eat STORE!!! starve.

It would have non sustained food source coming in. You would JACK insulin, store what you consumed and burn a bit and be hungry wanting More. Blood sugar would crash, you would be groggy irritable, etc then JACK it up again. Just the energy or lack of would likely lead to fat gain or less intake used, then you have to think about he general health risks.

cheers,
Phil