T Nation

Inspiration in the Gym

When I first started lifting last year, there was this blind guy who felt his way around with his cane. I watched in amazement as he loaded barbells, adjusted machine weights, found the DBs he needed WITH PERFECT PRECISION.

This morning was the first time since that we’ve been in the gym together. There were two noticable changes: he now has a seeing-eye dog and HE’S FUCKING HUGE!

It’s amazing to watch him rack a barbell perfectly or to grab the plates he needs. It was just a really inspiring moment.

My admiration at his “handicapability” (fucking political correctness) turned comical when I politely asked him if I could pet his dog. He said no, never while the dog is in harness/on duty. Then I watched five people walk by and pet his dog and he had no idea because HE’S BLIND!

[quote]Takinguptheroom wrote:
When I first started lifting last year, there was this blind guy who felt his way around with his cane. I watched in amazement as he loaded barbells, adjusted machine weights, found the DBs he needed WITH PERFECT PRECISION.

This morning was the first time since that we’ve been in the gym together. There were two noticable changes: he now has a seeing-eye dog and HE’S FUCKING HUGE!

It’s amazing to watch him rack a barbell perfectly or to grab the plates he needs. It was just a really inspiring moment.

My admiration at his “handicapability” (fucking political correctness) turned comical when I politely asked him if I could pet his dog. He said no, never while the dog is in harness/on duty. Then I watched five people walk by and pet his dog and he had no idea because HE’S BLIND![/quote]

Damn, I’ll have to get myself a seeing-eye dog as well! Maybe that’s the secret we’ve all been looking for…

But on a serious note, that really is amazing. Sometimes life throws shit our way, but when we find a way to keep going - and even improve - with such a handicap, it really shows how sturdy and innovative we as humans are.

Are you sure he didn’t notice people petting his dog? Usually blind people are amazing at hearing/sensing things, so there’s a chance he may have very well noticed that someone stopped next to his dog (assuming his dog was close by).

That really IS inspiring! I normally don’t bitch to myself and make lame excuses since I look forward to going to the gym and giving my soul over to the iron. I’m going to pull this story up next time one of my lame-ass buddies makes a stupid excuse to not go. I REALLY fucking hate the “I’m still sore from last time; I think I should back off; My pussy hurts; today is my exercise bike day”. I hate whiners… Besides, if you’re going to bitch and whine, why even show up in the first place?

[quote]Takinguptheroom wrote:
Then I watched five people walk by and pet his dog and he had no idea because HE’S BLIND![/quote]

that’s funny stuff. laters pk

We have a guy that comes in our gym with a dog too, but it doesn’t seem like he’s blind, so I’m not sure what medical role the dog plays. but it’s cool nontheless!

When I was going to a different gym than I go to now, there was a guy in a wheel chair that worked out there. I’m not sure what affliction he had but he had a semi-normal sized torso and really tiny and underformed legs. Anyway, he was in there at least three times a week even though he had to ask someone passing by to assist him in getting cables, etc. for almost all his lifts. I helped this guy on more than one occassion and was just blown away by what it must take to go through what he has to go through just to work out. Everything required that much more effort, let alone having to ask strangers for help all the time. Needless to say, anytime I don’t feel like lifting or making some lame-ass excuse for myself I still think of that guy even though I haven’t been to that gym in almost a year.

Kind of makes most of our everyday obstacles and excuses seem pretty pathetic. Sometimes I need to remind myself that I have the PRIVELEGE of lifting or doing cardio or any physical activity, instead of having a “HAVE TO” attitude.

[quote]youngliver wrote:
I’m not sure what affliction he had but he had a semi-normal sized torso and really tiny and underformed legs. [/quote]

This happens to everyone who spend their lives in a wheelchair: atrophy. The opposite of what we’re trying to do in the gym.

[quote]Takinguptheroom wrote:
youngliver wrote:
I’m not sure what affliction he had but he had a semi-normal sized torso and really tiny and underformed legs.

This happens to everyone who spend their lives in a wheelchair: atrophy. The opposite of what we’re trying to do in the gym.[/quote]

No this was definitely a disease that he was born with. I’m talking small length-wise, not atrophied apendages.

Yea,I’ve read about dogs that guide blind ppl.If you disturb the dogs,they’ll lose their concentration or something.But it’s not like he’s crossing a street.

Although in this case,I don’t know why you couldn’t pet the dog.