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Info About Sheiko

Ok so I think that at this point in my training career(about a year and a half), westside isn’t the best program for me. I feel that I need more work just doing the main lifts instead of worrying about rotating variations. I’ve done the sheiko beginners program and enjoyed it.

I’d prefer to make my own program around the Sheiko principles, but it is so difficult to find resources on it. I’ve heard his book is available online, but its in russian. I know theres some stuff on EliteFTS, but most of that is poorly translated. Is there anyone that can help me with this?

Yes, there is a fountain of Sheiko information on EliteFTS.

Just two questions for you if you don’t mind? Why is it that you feel that Westside did not work for you and how did you come to the conclusion that the (Sheiko) translations were poorly done?

http://www.elitefts.com/sheiko/default.asp

thats the only place i could find Sheiko info on their site, if you know of any others id love to read them.

The first 4 chapters of his book look like a good read and is important for what im looking for.

As far as the poor translations, i was referring to programs #30-32

I came to the conclusion based on knowing i have some form issues, that I feel i can address best with the ton of practice i’ll have with the high volume program. I like sheiko because it focuses on the work with the big 3 lifts, and some minimal assistence work, I think that this is best for me at this point because of my inexperience.

I went from westside to sheiko successfully. I think westside is hard to do by one’s self and is more complicated that most think.

I have a log of my actual sheiko routine in the strength section that I have been doing since Summer of 07’ ( only logged through Nov. 07 to now).

Hanley also has a long that at least in the beginning describes it.

Personally (take this with a grain of salt), I don’t like the set up that elitefts does for sheiko. Just my preference.

This site has the original sheiko…

http://www.joeskopec.com/programs.html

[quote]confusedjake wrote:
http://www.elitefts.com/sheiko/default.asp

thats the only place i could find Sheiko info on their site, if you know of any others id love to read them.

The first 4 chapters of his book look like a good read and is important for what im looking for.

As far as the poor translations, i was referring to programs #30-32

I came to the conclusion based on knowing i have some form issues, that I feel i can address best with the ton of practice i’ll have with the high volume program. I like sheiko because it focuses on the work with the big 3 lifts, and some minimal assistence work, I think that this is best for me at this point because of my inexperience.[/quote]

http://asp.elitefts.com/qa/training-logs.asp?qid=54819&tid=138

If you want help with Sheiko programming and you are serious, then contact my coach Dave Bates at veggaman@verizon.net

The link that the other poster posted is for a CMS/MS program and that is for the sports mastery group or someone that is basically a top 20 lifter in their weight class in the United States or their respected country.

Good luck to you.

Eric

A quick note:

I’ve put up some -slightly- more polished versions of Sheiko programs at:

http://www2.norwich.edu/mfenner/training.html

I made a few “editorial” decisions on my own. If you want, email me with corrections and or arguments why something should be different. Arguments based on “becuase I say so” will be ignored unless your last name happens to be … yup … Sheiko.

I will also have an interesting “small” variation that I’m putting up soon (I’m doing the four weeks now, it will be posted when I’m done … if I survive laugh).

Regards,
Mark

If you are going from Westside to Sheiko you can do a little bit of “try before you buy” by swapping your D.E. work with Sheiko percentages. So instead of speed bench, you’d do bench with 50%x5,60%x4,70%x3(2 sets), 80%x3(6 sets). D.E. Lower would be replaced by squat or deadlift, same percentages but one less set on 80%.

It’s a simple way to get acclimatised to it without changing the rest of your training, and you’ll see if it’ll help you without having to jump in the deep end in terms of volume.

Westside and Sheiko can both work for a beginner. The key is that you preform the program correctly. Judging from your training log (in the training log section), it is no surprise westside didn’t work for you. You didn’t even preform 50% of the program correctly.

[quote]smokotime wrote:
If you are going from Westside to Sheiko you can do a little bit of “try before you buy” by swapping your D.E. work with Sheiko percentages. So instead of speed bench, you’d do bench with 50%x5,60%x4,70%x3(2 sets), 80%x3(6 sets). D.E. Lower would be replaced by squat or deadlift, same percentages but one less set on 80%.

It’s a simple way to get acclimatised to it without changing the rest of your training, and you’ll see if it’ll help you without having to jump in the deep end in terms of volume.[/quote]

I don’t see the need for that. Sheiko works. I think he should just jump on a 4 week program and do it pretty much exactly as described. If this produces good result, he should probably just continue to do the same program until it stops giving decent gains.

Pavel’s overview:
martygallagher.com/training/training_more/117_0_8_0_M/

could anybody tell me where to find the classes example: CMS/MS

[quote]Jakebambeeno wrote:
Westside and Sheiko can both work for a beginner. The key is that you preform the program correctly. Judging from your training log (in the training log section), it is no surprise westside didn’t work for you. You didn’t even preform 50% of the program correctly.[/quote]

Agreed. That was a massive clusterfuck of a fail.

[quote]lbjc1703 wrote:
could anybody tell me where to find the classes example: CMS/MS[/quote]

The CMS/MS classification standards are not for unequipped lifting and they are not permanent. They have changed at least five times over the years. The ones most people have seen (on EliteFTS and in Matt McGorry’s article) were the standards from 1989-1992.

Here are the current classification standards (since 2006): http://powerlifting.jino-net.ru/norms.html

Here is an article by Boris Sheiko discussing the classification system: http://www.russia-pf.ru/print/st-normativ-sheiko.html

Maybe someone intimately familiar with training Sheiko can help me with this.

I’m amping up for a meet in 8 weeks (Apr. 2). To date I’ve trained a variation of 5/3/1 with a PL coach and club. I’ve want more volume and have considered trying Sheiko but it has been suggested I don’t switch this close to a major contest.

I was looking at the Sheiko comp template and really like the look of it. For those with sheiko and comp experience, would you make the switch now or wait until there is more time to play with a new training method.

[quote]ouroboro_s wrote:
Maybe someone intimately familiar with training Sheiko can help me with this.

I’m amping up for a meet in 8 weeks (Apr. 2). To date I’ve trained a variation of 5/3/1 with a PL coach and club. I’ve want more volume and have considered trying Sheiko but it has been suggested I don’t switch this close to a major contest.

I was looking at the Sheiko comp template and really like the look of it. For those with sheiko and comp experience, would you make the switch now or wait until there is more time to play with a new training method.[/quote]

The competition/peaking templates will not help you gain strength. They are designed to help you peak for a contest after months of training. I would recommend that you continue training with your PL coach and club up until the meet. It can take a little time to figure out your training maxes for Sheiko and adapt to the volume.

If you want more volume in the mean time, you could try the “Boring but big” variation of the 5/3/1 where you do the primary lift for five sets of ten with 50-60% of your max as assistance work.

[quote]ChaseT wrote:
ouroboro_s wrote:
Maybe someone intimately familiar with training Sheiko can help me with this.

I’m amping up for a meet in 8 weeks (Apr. 2). To date I’ve trained a variation of 5/3/1 with a PL coach and club. I’ve want more volume and have considered trying Sheiko but it has been suggested I don’t switch this close to a major contest.

I was looking at the Sheiko comp template and really like the look of it. For those with sheiko and comp experience, would you make the switch now or wait until there is more time to play with a new training method.

The competition/peaking templates will not help you gain strength. They are designed to help you peak for a contest after months of training. I would recommend that you continue training with your PL coach and club up until the meet. It can take a little time to figure out your training maxes for Sheiko and adapt to the volume.

If you want more volume in the mean time, you could try the “Boring but big” variation of the 5/3/1 where you do the primary lift for five sets of ten with 50-60% of your max as assistance work.[/quote]

Thanks, that’s kind of what I thought. My current method has worked for me in past competitions but it never feels like enough. I’m constantly getting it in the neck for doing too much. Currently I add multiple sets of lighter weight squats on back day when I have time.

If I achieve what I hope to at the meet, I’ll have until September to my next one so that should give enough time to change methods.

[quote]lbjc1703 wrote:
could anybody tell me where to find the classes example: CMS/MS[/quote]

Basically, you should raw bench press around 2xbw for MS under 82.5 kg category, around 20 kg less for CMS.
Heavier lifters (90 to 140+) should bench 140-160 for CMS and 160-180 for MS.
That is a very generalized explanation, but it should give you the idea.

By the way, in Russia it goes without saying that Sheiko’s are designed for juiced lifters. The man himself wouldn’t deny it.

If anyone is interested, I can translate to you his program for bench press. It consists of 4 days of bench press per week with 2 bench sessions per workout (bench press twice, or something like bench and board press). Madness.