T Nation

Increasing Work Capacity

Overview: Currently stationary job, moving to much more walking, hoping to not mess up my weight training by preparing before jumping into it.

I’m a student, so most of my time is spent sat down reading, which means I generally have quite a lot of energy for the gym. However, in about 2-3 months, I’ll be moving into the lab full time. I did some work experience, and full time lab work essentially means walking 4-5 hours a day, on my feet for 2 hours and cycling for about 30 minutes. I found it difficult to workout effectively.

Is there a way for me to increase my work capacity (sorry if this is the wrong terminology), so that when I start full time I can keep up with my weight training more easily?
P.S. Spending my whole summer on my feet is not really an option as I have a desk job at home.

I know many people on here don’t like it, but Crossfit is great for increasing work capacity. You don’t have to totally drop your program and go all in, and only do Crossfit, cause I do think it has a lot of holes in the program. But, they use EDT (Escalating Density Training), which I’ve seen praised on Tmuscle, and they use Complexes, like the new article “A Complex Solution for Quads/Hams”, so when you break it down, and identify a few workouts from there to be a “Finisher” for your normal workout, you will increase your work capacity without losing Strength/Size.

[quote]OrcusDM wrote:
I’m a student, so most of my time is spent sat down reading, which means I generally have quite a lot of energy for the gym. However, in about 2-3 months, I’ll be moving into the lab full time. I did some work experience, and full time lab work essentially means walking 4-5 hours a day, on my feet for 2 hours and cycling for about 30 minutes. I found it difficult to workout effectively.[/quote]

As long as your nutrition is adequate, you should adapt to being on your feet more in a week or two once you start the new job.

You could start doing daily walks to help speed your adaptation, but it shouldn’t be a big deal either way. There are plenty of people with far more physical jobs who still manage to make good progress, so don’t let this become an excuse for you.