T Nation

Increase Deadlift


#1

Hello, I am 16 years old and have been lifting for a bit more than a year. I have done Starting Strength and I am currently doing a modified version of Madcow's 5x5 which has been working for me, for the most part.

I am having trouble increasing my deadlift. Right now my squat and deadlift are the same. Is there anything that could aid me in increasing my deadlift? As for now I am pulling sumo because it seemed like I was going no where with conventional.

16 years old
5'7" 181lbs
275lbs bench press
425lbs back squat (low bar), with belt
425lbs sumo deadlift, with belt


#2

My guess is that either you are squatting high or you have short arms. Just stick with one deadlift stance and keep training it, if you have only been lifting for a year then you don’t need anything too special to increase your lifts.


#3

In my experience when a lift stalls its usually due to form breakdown. Either because my form sucks, or I have a weak muscle group and or movement pattern.

Since your still in the beginner phase, you really haven’t had a chance to develop strengths and weaknesses. So this leads me to believe that your form is off on you pull or you squat high. Maybe its because you have short arms are small hands and cant grip it well, but without any more information, I’m leaning towards form. Really, its hard to say with just the info you provided.

Post a vid up of your squat and deadlift. From the side for each is best. If you can get video from the front or even the back of the squat, that would help too just to make sure the knees are tracking properly.


#4

As your squat goes up generally your deadlift will go up assuming you’re addressing technical issues and weak muscle groups.

As a few have said, post a video or three.


#5

Madcow provides a number of strategies for overcoming stalls. Which have you tried?

Also remember Madcow is a 12 week program. After the 12 week block, you reset and start from the beginning (ie. Go back 4 weeks from your max).


#6

Video please.

Also, there’s nothing inherently wrong with a matching squat and DL. Most people have a higher DL than squat, but if you’re squatting properly and it matches your DL don’t worry as long as both are going up. Not EVERYONE has a higher DL than squat.


#7

You need to switch up your program every 8-10 weeks. There are many out there, so I’ll let you find the ones you like. Also, make sure that you are taking a full week off every 8-10 weeks to allow your muscles to fully recover and to avoid over training. Proper sleep and nutrition will also help you avoid over training.


#8

[quote]yaavthikel34 wrote:
You need to switch up your program every 8-10 weeks. There are many out there, so I’ll let you find the ones you like. Also, make sure that you are taking a full week off every 8-10 weeks to allow your muscles to fully recover and to avoid over training [/quote]

This is quite possibly some of the worst advice I have had the misfortune to read on this forum.

Go tell any successful powerlifter or bodybuilder that every couple of months they need to change how they train. See what happens. Nothing wrong with switching exercise variations around a bit if you get bored easily. Definitely change assistance exercises regularly if you like. But switch programs every two months? How exactly are you supposed to get any stronger or bigger or better? If a program doesn’t work after three to six months of following it to the letter then of course changing to a different one makes sense, provided you’re sure your nutrition was on point and your recovery was too. But changing so often simply to change is so stupid it isn’t funny.

A deload every eight to 10 weeks I can just about buy, although it probably shouldn’t be a complete rest. More like reduced volume and intensity.


#9

[quote]MarkKO wrote:

[quote]yaavthikel34 wrote:
You need to switch up your program every 8-10 weeks. There are many out there, so I’ll let you find the ones you like. Also, make sure that you are taking a full week off every 8-10 weeks to allow your muscles to fully recover and to avoid over training [/quote]

This is quite possibly some of the worst advice I have had the misfortune to read on this forum. [/quote]

His only other post on the site is pretty bad too.

And agreed. If a program works, you don’t EVER have to change it. Most great lifters more or less run the same type of programming year in and year out.

THAT BEING SAID… there is the fact that this guy is 16 years old. At that age, I think it would be a good idea, in the first 5 years of lifting at least, to run a few different programs that utilize different training philosophies. Just for the experience.


#10

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
THAT BEING SAID… there is the fact that this guy is 16 years old. At that age, I think it would be a good idea, in the first 5 years of lifting at least, to run a few different programs that utilize different training philosophies. Just for the experience.[/quote]

Absolutely, the key here is a few programs in the first 5 years.

Newbs have the advantage that the need little specificity to progress. Shit, I remember getting guys to sprint alone would improve their deadlifts when they first started.

So this is the time when moving around won’t hurt as badly as when they have years of experience under their belt.

That said, I think it’s a shite load different to have someone plan 12 weeks of program A, 24 weeks of program B then 24 weeks of program C than jumping around haphazardly after they read an article - that just breeds the wrong attitude (to lifting and life)

10 years later, they post on here saying they have trained for 10 years and squat less than 3 plates.


#11

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
THAT BEING SAID… there is the fact that this guy is 16 years old. At that age, I think it would be a good idea, in the first 5 years of lifting at least, to run a few different programs that utilize different training philosophies. Just for the experience.[/quote]

You hit the nail on the head there. Maybe five to at most 10 programs in that first five years would be a great way to start out, because you’d get at least six months on each one.


#12

How about some time? These lifts are very good for a 16 years old.


#13

[quote]MarkKO wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
THAT BEING SAID… there is the fact that this guy is 16 years old. At that age, I think it would be a good idea, in the first 5 years of lifting at least, to run a few different programs that utilize different training philosophies. Just for the experience.[/quote]

You hit the nail on the head there. Maybe five to at most 10 programs in that first five years would be a great way to start out, because you’d get at least six months on each one. [/quote]

Yep. I ran a lot of different programs, mostly bodybuilding-oriented, in my first several years, before landing on 5/3/1 and dedicating myself to really building strength everywhere. I wouldn’t have found my niche if I had looked at 5/3/1 and said ‘nah, too much legs, not enough biceps’ (which was essentially how I lifted previously). Conversely, someone who starts out with basic powerlifting templates may eventually find that bodybuilding suits their mentality better if they give it a chance. I’m thinking of Shelby Starnes here, as well as Ronnie Coleman and even Arnold. Arnold competed as both a powerlifter and a weightlifter early on his career, before he dedicated himself 100% to bodybuilding. And Shelby was predominantly a powerlifter for several years, before he realized he simply liked the nuances of bodybuilding more than what he had previously done.


#14

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]MarkKO wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
THAT BEING SAID… there is the fact that this guy is 16 years old. At that age, I think it would be a good idea, in the first 5 years of lifting at least, to run a few different programs that utilize different training philosophies. Just for the experience.[/quote]

You hit the nail on the head there. Maybe five to at most 10 programs in that first five years would be a great way to start out, because you’d get at least six months on each one. [/quote]

Yep. I ran a lot of different programs, mostly bodybuilding-oriented, in my first several years, before landing on 5/3/1 and dedicating myself to really building strength everywhere. I wouldn’t have found my niche if I had looked at 5/3/1 and said ‘nah, too much legs, not enough biceps’ (which was essentially how I lifted previously). Conversely, someone who starts out with basic powerlifting templates may eventually find that bodybuilding suits their mentality better if they give it a chance. I’m thinking of Shelby Starnes here, as well as Ronnie Coleman and even Arnold. Arnold competed as both a powerlifter and a weightlifter early on his career, before he dedicated himself 100% to bodybuilding. And Shelby was predominantly a powerlifter for several years, before he realized he simply liked the nuances of bodybuilding more than what he had previously done.[/quote]

Wise, wise words. Even over a relatively short time I’ve found I see best progress doing the PL lifts (well, since I compete I have to) with more bb style work to complement them. I used to stick only to PL stuff but there was always something missing.