T Nation

Incline Bench: Where to Bring the Bar?

Doing straight bar incline…suppose to touch chest or bring it down to your chin…i heard its hard on your shoulders to bring it all the way down.

if u have any shoulder ‘issues’ you should avoid allowing the bar to touch your chest. some people say to stop a inch or two above the chest, others say to stop whe your arms hit a 90 degree bend at the elbows. you really have to see or yourself what feels comfortable.

S

you wont get different results??

[quote]tlydi23 wrote:
you wont get different results??[/quote]

it’s possible, but at the very bottom of the press it is mainly shoulders. it also isn’t worth hurting the shoulders with those extra 2 or so inches to touch the chest.

Far too many variables to offer a trite response like “Keep it at your clavicles”. Off the top of my head you might want to consider:

Shoulder girdle health
Mobility
Hydration
Neural concerns
Mechanical Considerations (Relative lever length)
Hand Positioning
Exact angle of bench relative to body position
Intention of movment

and the list goes on.

M.

I like the chest stretch I get if I bring it all the way down, but my right shoulder has been hurting lately and I find I have to stop at my chin at the moment.

Won’t you be able to really load the bar then? Then being called out by real pl’s?

You mean I shouldnt just load up a bunch of weight and only lower the bar a couple of inches?? What??

[quote]Big M. wrote:
Far too many variables to offer a trite response like “Keep it at your clavicles”. Off the top of my head you might want to consider:

Shoulder girdle health
Mobility
Hydration
Neural concerns
Mechanical Considerations (Relative lever length)
Hand Positioning
Exact angle of bench relative to body position
Intention of movment

and the list goes on.

M.

[/quote]

X2. I once trained with a buddy who used dumbells for incline. On the negative, his arm fell back and I heard his shoulder pop. He now can’t go all the way down on incline with the barbell. I think it really depends on your targeted area. Obviously,incline is for chest, but like it has been said before; it can also be a great front delt exercise. Just make sure you dont bounce it off of your sternum. Control the sonovabitch.’

Also, make sure you are training shoulders directly. Kind of basic sounding I KNOW. But more often then not, certain movement patterns are overtrained, (bENCH,) while others are undertrained (military press) this can really fuck with your range of motion.

you wouldn’t do a quarter squat would you?

do the whole movement if you have no shoulder issues. If your physical therapist tells you otherwise then follow that.

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
you wouldn’t do a quarter squat would you?

do the whole movement if you have no shoulder issues. If your physical therapist tells you otherwise then follow that. [/quote]

Why wouldn’t you do a quarter squat? If this is the range you are capable of displaying control at the time then it might be indicated.

A really simple technique to determine demonstrative control is to simply bend your elbows 90 degrees while externally rotating your humerus as far as you can held out at 90 degrees from your body. Assuming you achieve symmetry in both flexion at the elbow and ab/adduction (depending on planar movement) at the shoulder, press your hands up over your head then back again. Assuming symmetrical pain free motion internally rotate your humerus about 5 degrees and repeat the process all over again until you are “pressing” your hands and arms as close to straight down along the plane of your body (sagittal, for you physiology folks!)

As long as you move pain free through all of this you have established your movement limitations and you should make every effort to stay withing these limits, until such time as you address any imbalances or inefficiencies you may demonstrate.

Hope this helps.
M.

[quote]Big M. wrote:
Ct. Rockula wrote:
you wouldn’t do a quarter squat would you?

do the whole movement if you have no shoulder issues. If your physical therapist tells you otherwise then follow that.

Why wouldn’t you do a quarter squat? If this is the range you are capable of displaying control at the time then it might be indicated.

A really simple technique to determine demonstrative control is to simply bend your elbows 90 degrees while externally rotating your humerus as far as you can held out at 90 degrees from your body. Assuming you achieve symmetry in both flexion at the elbow and ab/adduction (depending on planar movement) at the shoulder, press your hands up over your head then back again. Assuming symmetrical pain free motion internally rotate your humerus about 5 degrees and repeat the process all over again until you are “pressing” your hands and arms as close to straight down along the plane of your body (sagittal, for you physiology folks!)

As long as you move pain free through all of this you have established your movement limitations and you should make every effort to stay withing these limits, until such time as you address any imbalances or inefficiencies you may demonstrate.

Hope this helps.
M.[/quote]

I’m just saying that range should be full if there’s no injurie. I don’t thinkop said he was injured…her was just going by what someone said, and yiu know how that goes, right?

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
Big M. wrote:
Ct. Rockula wrote:
you wouldn’t do a quarter squat would you?

do the whole movement if you have no shoulder issues. If your physical therapist tells you otherwise then follow that.

Why wouldn’t you do a quarter squat? If this is the range you are capable of displaying control at the time then it might be indicated.

A really simple technique to determine demonstrative control is to simply bend your elbows 90 degrees while externally rotating your humerus as far as you can held out at 90 degrees from your body. Assuming you achieve symmetry in both flexion at the elbow and ab/adduction (depending on planar movement) at the shoulder, press your hands up over your head then back again. Assuming symmetrical pain free motion internally rotate your humerus about 5 degrees and repeat the process all over again until you are “pressing” your hands and arms as close to straight down along the plane of your body (sagittal, for you physiology folks!)

As long as you move pain free through all of this you have established your movement limitations and you should make every effort to stay withing these limits, until such time as you address any imbalances or inefficiencies you may demonstrate.

Hope this helps.
M.

I’m just saying that range should be full if there’s no injurie. I don’t thinkop said he was injured…her was just going by what someone said, and yiu know how that goes, right?
[/quote]

Indeed I do know how it goes, and I’m not suggesting you were wrong per se. Rather I’m posing the question: Who can conclusively say what “Full Range” is, without the proper assessment? The above exercise is a very simple way to help determine what an individuals “Full Range” might be for him/her at that particular time under those particular circumstances.

See what I mean? I’m merely cautioning anyone from making assumptions before they go ahead and perform a movement just because “It’s supposed to look that way”. We are all unique and have our own variables to consider before attempting exercise, so always proceed with caution.

M.

[quote]Big M. wrote:
Ct. Rockula wrote:
Big M. wrote:
Ct. Rockula wrote:
you wouldn’t do a quarter squat would you?

do the whole movement if you have no shoulder issues. If your physical therapist tells you otherwise then follow that.

Why wouldn’t you do a quarter squat? If this is the range you are capable of displaying control at the time then it might be indicated.

A really simple technique to determine demonstrative control is to simply bend your elbows 90 degrees while externally rotating your humerus as far as you can held out at 90 degrees from your body. Assuming you achieve symmetry in both flexion at the elbow and ab/adduction (depending on planar movement) at the shoulder, press your hands up over your head then back again. Assuming symmetrical pain free motion internally rotate your humerus about 5 degrees and repeat the process all over again until you are “pressing” your hands and arms as close to straight down along the plane of your body (sagittal, for you physiology folks!)

As long as you move pain free through all of this you have established your movement limitations and you should make every effort to stay withing these limits, until such time as you address any imbalances or inefficiencies you may demonstrate.

Hope this helps.
M.

I’m just saying that range should be full if there’s no injurie. I don’t thinkop said he was injured…her was just going by what someone said, and yiu know how that goes, right?

Indeed I do know how it goes, and I’m not suggesting you were wrong per se. Rather I’m posing the question: Who can conclusively say what “Full Range” is, without the proper assessment? The above exercise is a very simple way to help determine what an individuals “Full Range” might be for him/her at that particular time under those particular circumstances.

See what I mean? I’m merely cautioning anyone from making assumptions before they go ahead and perform a movement just because “It’s supposed to look that way”. We are all unique and have our own variables to consider before attempting exercise, so always proceed with caution.

M.
[/quote]

ahh gotcha.

[quote]Big M. wrote:
Ct. Rockula wrote:
Big M. wrote:
Ct. Rockula wrote:
you wouldn’t do a quarter squat would you?

do the whole movement if you have no shoulder issues. If your physical therapist tells you otherwise then follow that.

Why wouldn’t you do a quarter squat? If this is the range you are capable of displaying control at the time then it might be indicated.

A really simple technique to determine demonstrative control is to simply bend your elbows 90 degrees while externally rotating your humerus as far as you can held out at 90 degrees from your body. Assuming you achieve symmetry in both flexion at the elbow and ab/adduction (depending on planar movement) at the shoulder, press your hands up over your head then back again. Assuming symmetrical pain free motion internally rotate your humerus about 5 degrees and repeat the process all over again until you are “pressing” your hands and arms as close to straight down along the plane of your body (sagittal, for you physiology folks!)

As long as you move pain free through all of this you have established your movement limitations and you should make every effort to stay withing these limits, until such time as you address any imbalances or inefficiencies you may demonstrate.

Hope this helps.
M.

I’m just saying that range should be full if there’s no injury. I don’t think op said he was injured…he was just going by what someone said, and you know how that goes, right?

Indeed I do know how it goes, and I’m not suggesting you were wrong per se. Rather I’m posing the question: Who can conclusively say what “Full Range” is, without the proper assessment? The above exercise is a very simple way to help determine what an individuals “Full Range” might be for him/her at that particular time under those particular circumstances.

See what I mean? I’m merely cautioning anyone from making assumptions before they go ahead and perform a movement just because “It’s supposed to look that way”. We are all unique and have our own variables to consider before attempting exercise, so always proceed with caution.

M.
[/quote]