T Nation

Improvised Reverse Hypers

I’ve never had access to a way to do these; then today, looking at the leg curl station, it suddenly dawned on me: if I just move my body down one, so to speak, so my torso is where my quads would usually be, and my knees are almost touching the ground, then I can lower the roller on the station and effectively do a reverse hyper.

Effectively–this is the question. It feels like it’s hitting the right muscles. Anybody see any drawbacks, given that my other options are nil?

[quote]ritmo wrote:
Anybody see any drawbacks, given that my other options are nil?
[/quote]

You’ll look like a dork doing it?

[quote]ritmo wrote:
I’ve never had access to a way to do these; then today, looking at the leg curl station, it suddenly dawned on me: if I just move my body down one, so to speak, so my torso is where my quads would usually be, and my knees are almost touching the ground, then I can lower the roller on the station and effectively do a reverse hyper.

Effectively–this is the question. It feels like it’s hitting the right muscles. Anybody see any drawbacks, given that my other options are nil?

[/quote]

This seems like a really good idea. I’m going to try it out for myself and see how it feels.

Yes should be ok except you lose the statci hold of the hams when its near your ankles. pul youde better be one short S.O.B. good luck.

Id just do some RDL’s and back extensions and call it good Reverse Hypers are great I love mine but not an indespensible tool.

Phill

You also may not be getting the spinal traction/deloading you normaly would as well. Other options are: off the end of a tailgate or tall table with a DB between your feet. I used to use a decline bench that you could remove the leg holds from.

Otherwise, congrats on finding an option.

Swissball on a bench works for reverse hypers. I tried it today and it worked fine

I thought it wasn’t good to do hypers?

"Hyperextension

Frequent extension of the spine under loaded conditions is often the catalyst for damage to the posterior elements. Those with spinal instability will be particularly sensitive to lumbar extension due to the shear and compressive forces upon the damaged lamina and facet joints.

Even though most T-Nation readers are smart enough to know they should stay far, far away from any hyperextension exercise, for those with spinal instability, this is even more important."

That’s taken from the recent “Conquering Enemies of the Spine” article.

[quote]Fulmen wrote:
I thought it wasn’t good to do hypers?

"Hyperextension

Frequent extension of the spine under loaded conditions is often the catalyst for damage to the posterior elements. Those with spinal instability will be particularly sensitive to lumbar extension due to the shear and compressive forces upon the damaged lamina and facet joints.

Even though most T-Nation readers are smart enough to know they should stay far, far away from any hyperextension exercise, for those with spinal instability, this is even more important."

That’s taken from the recent “Conquering Enemies of the Spine” article.
[/quote]

They should be called reverse extensions. Keep the spine neutral, fire the glutes! Then its an awesome accessory.

[quote]gmantheman wrote:
Swissball on a bench works for reverse hypers. I tried it today and it worked fine[/quote]

How’d you set it up? The way I see this in my mind’s eye, you’re setting up for a glute/ham – heels under the bench, knees in the swissball, hike yourself over the ball.

What am I missing?

[quote]Fulmen wrote:
I thought it wasn’t good to do hypers?

"Hyperextension

Frequent extension of the spine under loaded conditions is often the catalyst for damage to the posterior elements. Those with spinal instability will be particularly sensitive to lumbar extension due to the shear and compressive forces upon the damaged lamina and facet joints.

Even though most T-Nation readers are smart enough to know they should stay far, far away from any hyperextension exercise, for those with spinal instability, this is even more important."

That’s taken from the recent “Conquering Enemies of the Spine” article.
[/quote]

That’s wierd.

I’ve always considered reverse hypers to be a flexion of the erector spinea, glutes, and hams.

Oh well. Wouldn’t be the first time that articles from different authors conflicted.

[quote]sdspeedracer wrote:
gmantheman wrote:
Swissball on a bench works for reverse hypers. I tried it today and it worked fine

How’d you set it up? The way I see this in my mind’s eye, you’re setting up for a glute/ham – heels under the bench, knees in the swissball, hike yourself over the ball.

What am I missing?[/quote]
Just place the ball on the bench and lie over the ball while holding on the edge of the bench.

Why don’t you just do heavy ass deadlifts?

[quote]gmantheman wrote:
sdspeedracer wrote:
gmantheman wrote:
Swissball on a bench works for reverse hypers. I tried it today and it worked fine

How’d you set it up? The way I see this in my mind’s eye, you’re setting up for a glute/ham – heels under the bench, knees in the swissball, hike yourself over the ball.

What am I missing?
Just place the ball on the bench and lie over the ball while holding on the edge of the bench.

[/quote]

Got it – makes sense with a smaller ball than I was imagining.

Cool, thanks.

I only give rev hypers to people who cant handle back extensions due to pain.

Do them over a swiss ball on a bench or even just on the ground in a really easy push up position.

No as good as on the roman chair, but will do the trick.

[quote]Fulmen wrote:
Why don’t you just do heavy ass deadlifts?[/quote]

Can’t do heavy deads all the time – too much damage potential. Also, if you’re following a Westside or Elite Deadlift/Squat index, dynamic days call for deads as a primary and Rvs Hypers as a secondary assistance exercise.

So the answer is to do Rvs Hypers to make your deads better.