T Nation

I'm Quitting Tomorrow.

Tomorrow I’m putting in my two weeks at my job. I work as a valet at a luxury hotel. The money has been amazing and it’s what has held me back from leaving earlier. I asked to move from full time to part time so I could work at the local airport and focus on my flight lessons. I told them they could have two weeks to make the change. My boss said it was no problem, we could schedule around it sooner.

That was two months ago. He scheduled me for 4 or 5 days per week every week, when he knows I work 2 days at the airport. I’ve decided I’m too young to be selling my soul for tips.

I’m going to work at the airport 3 days week and take as many flight lessons as I can. In June, I’ll start working at a summer day camp. I’ll be doing the hike leading, ropes course, and rock climbing. In the fall, I’ll start advanced flight training or the local junior college. I’m just passing this on because I’m rather excited.

Congratulations, I can see you won’t regret it.

Why bother with the 2wks? Just leave now.

I’ve done that before, thought it was the noble thing to do and in hindsight realised that if I hated the job, I should’ve just walked out the door.

But you’re making the right choice and you’re gonna do well with the lessons. Keep it up!

Congratulations on your decision! All the best :slight_smile:

[quote]Sxio wrote:
Why bother with the 2wks? Just leave now.

I’ve done that before, thought it was the noble thing to do and in hindsight realised that if I hated the job, I should’ve just walked out the door.

But you’re making the right choice and you’re gonna do well with the lessons. Keep it up![/quote]

because you don’t want to burn any reference bridges, especially if you are just starting out as it sounds like this guy is. he may need the reference for his next job and walking out won’t bring a good report.

I am thinking you are a good kid with a good plan and good intentions - best of luck.

I would agree put in the two week notice to save any unnecessary hassles in the future - its a small world.

sounds like you got a plan. good for you dude, and best of luck. Out of curiosity, how old are you?

[quote]texasguy wrote:
Sxio wrote:
Why bother with the 2wks? Just leave now.

I’ve done that before, thought it was the noble thing to do and in hindsight realised that if I hated the job, I should’ve just walked out the door.

But you’re making the right choice and you’re gonna do well with the lessons. Keep it up!

because you don’t want to burn any reference bridges, especially if you are just starting out as it sounds like this guy is. he may need the reference for his next job and walking out won’t bring a good report. [/quote]

F the references bridges. All they are supposed to do is verify dates of employment.

Seriously, though…Do your two weeks. It is the classy thing to do.

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
sounds like you got a plan. good for you dude, and best of luck. Out of curiosity, how old are you?[/quote]

I’m 18 years old.

I’m definetely giving two weeks notice. Work experience and good references are what I have going for me in getting a new job.

Thank you guys for all the support. I’m really surprised by it, I’ll let you all know how it goes.

Well, they weren’t too happy. Our department is already short staffed as it is, and they haven’t been able to get any new hires. A few other guys are considering quitting as well. Turns out when you have very high standards and pay minimum wage, people get a little resentful.
The airport manager was stoked when I told him I wanted to work 3 days a week. Seems it’s all going to work out.

[quote]jp_dubya wrote:

F the references bridges. All they are supposed to do is verify dates of employment.

Seriously, though…Do your two weeks. It is the classy thing to do.
[/quote]

It might vary from state to state but I am pretty sure, as the former employer you are only allowed to give the time of employment and wether or not the person would be eligible to be rehired. if you give anything else you can be in trouble. BB

[quote]biggieben wrote:
jp_dubya wrote:

F the references bridges. All they are supposed to do is verify dates of employment.

Seriously, though…Do your two weeks. It is the classy thing to do.

It might vary from state to state but I am pretty sure, as the former employer you are only allowed to give the time of employment and wether or not the person would be eligible to be rehired. if you give anything else you can be in trouble. BB
[/quote]

As a lawyer, allow me to point out that what the law is and what happens in reality are often very different.
Furthermore, the above is not the law in Georgia and several other states that I am aware of. As long as your former employer doesn’t lie to the new employer, they can give you a bad review. Besides, it just good practice to give the 2 weeks.

[quote]snewland22 wrote:
biggieben wrote:
jp_dubya wrote:

F the references bridges. All they are supposed to do is verify dates of employment.

Seriously, though…Do your two weeks. It is the classy thing to do.

It might vary from state to state but I am pretty sure, as the former employer you are only allowed to give the time of employment and wether or not the person would be eligible to be rehired. if you give anything else you can be in trouble. BB

As a lawyer, allow me to point out that what the law is and what happens in reality are often very different.
Furthermore, the above is not the law in Georgia and several other states that I am aware of. As long as your former employer doesn’t lie to the new employer, they can give you a bad review. Besides, it just good practice to give the 2 weeks.[/quote]

I was about to say the same thing. What is supposed to happen doesn’t always mean it will happen in the hiring process. People talk, especially when it concerns putting the future of their business in another person’s hands; all employees are representatives of their respective employers.

So no, don’t F the reference bridges.

To the OP, best of luck with your decision.

I took a $20,000/yr pay cut to take the job I have now and it’s the best thing I ever did. I’ll make up the difference in a few years but the big difference is that I won’t have a miserable job. You’ll adjust, you’ll learn how to deal with less money. In the long run you’ll be on top. Good luck.

What happens and what the law says should is definately not the same. I was just pointing out what the rules say for around here and what many large companies(chains/Corperate) may do so as to limit their responsibility. If you truly hate the job and you have already given the manager a two week time table to change your schedule and gave it a month to be done, you have alreay given a show of good faith.

You could simply tell him if he wants you to work he has to make the changes you asked for a month ago. However I have never left a job without giving at least 2 weeks notice, and always made sure to keep as good a relationship with the former employer as possible.

It is definately better in the long run to keep good standing with former employers and not burn bridges you never know when they will throw your name out there and you will be able to get another better job. BB

[quote]biggieben wrote:
What happens and what the law says should is definately not the same. I was just pointing out what the rules say for around here and what many large companies(chains/Corperate) may do so as to limit their responsibility. If you truly hate the job and you have already given the manager a two week time table to change your schedule and gave it a month to be done, you have alreay given a show of good faith.

You could simply tell him if he wants you to work he has to make the changes you asked for a month ago. However I have never left a job without giving at least 2 weeks notice, and always made sure to keep as good a relationship with the former employer as possible.

It is definitely better in the long run to keep good standing with former employers and not burn bridges you never know when they will throw your name out there and you will be able to get another better job. BB [/quote]

I agree with you it’s better for both parties to leave things on good terms, but I was under the impression that even if a past employer were asked their opinion of you(formally, like for reference checking)they legally cannot say anything bad.

[quote]travisimo wrote:
Well, they weren’t too happy. Our department is already short staffed as it is, and they haven’t been able to get any new hires. A few other guys are considering quitting as well. Turns out when you have very high standards and pay minimum wage, people get a little resentful.
[/quote]

Don’t be a teacher; your last line describes my ‘profession’.

Good luck!

Today my boss offered me to move to on-call status. That means I only work as often as I want to. I’d keep my discounts at the spa and restaraunt as well. It would only be for the next six weeks until the camp job starts. I’m considering it, but it means I’d have to stay up to their grooming standards.

I also know he’s going to ask me to work more than I’m willing. The main downside is I’ve heard of someone else doing this and getting scheduled way more than he bargained for. I may take the offer and if they don’t stay honest, drop them.

Dude, whatever your boss promises with the schedule, make DAMN sure you get it IN WRITING.
There is nothing worse than agreeing to things and then when you try to make them hold to it they claim, “I never said that”.
Take it from one who has been burned…several times…
Remember, if it isn’t written down it doesn’t count.