T Nation

I'm 16. What Should I Do/Take?


#1

I’ve been a skinny kid all my life, meaning that I have had a super high matabolism all of my life. Over the last year I had wanted to get bigger. I did this by taking creatine, pre workouts, lots of eating/good carbs etc and lifting every day after school with great form and everything. But yet I only managed to gain 4 pounds within 1 year. I am currently 5’10’’ 135 ibs. I’m not sure what else to do… any suggestions?


#2

Eat slightly more food. What does your diet look like on a typical day?


#3

Supplements aren’t really necessary yet. Creatine isn’t a bad choice if you want to stick with it, though. The biggest advice I’d give is to eat. A lot. And by that, I mean, eat more than you think that you can fit inside you. If you think you’re eating enough, you’re probably not. Also, having a really fast metabolism, you don’t need to eat only clean foods – they’ll just be processed by your body too quickly. If circumstances allow, eat some cheeseburgers or pizza (or other unhealthy foods) from time to time.


#4

Keep at it. Tall skinny kids that keep lifting turn into beasts by their early-mid 20’s.


#5

It’s pretty clear your not eating enough, forget the super high metabolism stuff, that’s an excuse and very likely not true. Take a real honest look at what your eating, count the calories, don’t lie to yourself. You need to eat like a man on a mission. I’m speaking from experience, I used to use the same excuse, until I realised I was actually eating like a hamster. I can give you a few easy tips if you like.

Also you have not mentioned training. What does that look like? More detail the better.


#6

We still need you professor X.

Eat man, protein/fat/carbs eat them all.

Tell you what. Make a fat friend. Give her your cell phone number. Have her text you every time she is hungry or eating. When you get that text, you stop what you’re doing and eat.


#7

because one like wasn’t enough, I’m reposting this.


#8

Eat a shit ton and drop the preworkout. That stuff becomes way too much of crutch later on


#9

Track your caloric intake using the MyFitnessPal app or something of that nature. I literally have not eaten a food that I couldn’t find its nutritional information on there.

Start at a daily goal of 3500 calories goal and go from there. Hit that goal on every training day (which is five days per week for me) and just eat until you’re full on your rest days.

Do that for two weeks straight and see if you gain a pound or two. If not, bump up your caloric goal to 3800. Try that for a few weeks. Still nothing? Go to 4000 and above. Calories don’t lie. It’s simple, but too few people are disciplined about it.

As for training, make sure you’re squatting and benching multiple times per week and deadlifting at least once if you so choose. Train them between 3-8 sets and between 2-15 reps. Write down every workout and increase a variable every week for each lift (so increase number of sets or reps or weight or a combination thereof).

And most importantly, be patient. Strength is a marathon, not a sprint; a journey, not a destination. And while you might want to gain 20 pounds of muscle and increase your lifts more than anything in the whole world, keep in mind that you still want to be training 10, 20, 30 years from now.

Let me know if this is helpful and how you progress.

Will


#10

[quote=“devinnchs, post:1, topic:228460”]
lots of eating/good carbs etc[/quote]
What, exactly, did you eat yesterday?

If you’re lifting literally every day, that could be another issue especially if you’re not eating enough. Plenty of effective size programs “only” need three well-programmed days of lifting.

Training is the easy thing to fix. The main priority is getting the calories in.

And x2 on ditching the pre-workout. The last thing you need is a caffeine-based supplement to burn even more calories when training. On that note, I kinda hate that you chose to make the thread title “What Should I Do/Take?” instead of “What Should I Do/Eat?” Unless you’re open to hearing that you should take 600-800 calories, 4 or 5 times a day. Because that’d be good.


#11

@Basement_Gainz

The fat friend thing won’t work. She obviously will have a super slow metabolism.


#12

Train four days a week and eat like a horse.

When your dinner alone is over half a chicken, three or four potatoes and a couple of cups of vegetables and you’re eating three other meals of similar size per day you’re close to eating enough. Easy hacks to lots of calories: 375 gram jar of peanut butter per day; and/or a kilo/two and half pounds of minced beef (ground beef) per day.

For training start each day by working up to a top set of a squat, overhead press, bench press and deadlift variation. Focus on setting rep PRs, try to keep the same main lift for around six to eight weeks at least but don’t be afraid to change after that period of you want. Follow that with 50-100 total reps each of three exercises that help the main lift, one if which each day should be some kind of row or vertical pull. Do sprints on one or two other days of week.


#13

Being fat I would love for this to be true, that fat people like me have a valid excuse. It isn’t. if you overeat by 3,500 calories with no training you gain a lb of fat. Doesn’t matter what your maintenance level is. Overeatimg is happening if you gain weight.

My suggestion was serious. Skinny guys undereat. I know this because they are skinny. Unless OP has a tape worm or a wasting disease then he isn’t eating enough.

The skinny guys I know eat small portions, skip meals and don’t snack. Now you could either be intentional and change behaviors, or look to someone who already has the right behaviors for gaining weight. Just switch out better food choices and make sure you train.


#14

I was taking the piss, I mentioned in my initial post that the metabolism stuff was rubbish. I forgot to add a smiley face at the end. :wink:


#15

Take steak.