T Nation

I'll be Impressed if You Know. Olive Oil!

Lets say your stir-frying 200g turkey.

I put 4 teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil into the pan. 45 kcals per spoon. 180 kclas in total.

Question is: Is all of the olive oil being absorbed by the turkey, or is some of the oil evaporating because of the heat

200g turkey:210 kcals + 180 kcal olive oil = 390 kcal

                                     or

is it less???

most of the oil is being evaporated from the heat. Sometimes when I do add EVOO to my meal i put it in the last second or even AFTER its done cooking. I don’t know how effective this method is but its seems to make sense

i’d count it all

You shouldn’t be stir-frying with EV olive oil. Burn point is much too low, and the heat will destroy whatever goodness is in there. Use the cheap olive oil, or a peanut or safflower oil.

You destroy the health benefits of EVOO when you cook with it.

Use coconut oil to cook stuff.

Sound out! :slight_smile:

Still tho, even with the oils you mentioned, is all the oil being absorbed or is some evaporating and therefore reducing the calorie conent

Right, can i use just normal olive oil, but not evoo

[quote]paul496 wrote:
Right, can i use just normal olive oil, but not evoo[/quote]

no-

use butter.

[quote]orion wrote:
paul496 wrote:
Right, can i use just normal olive oil, but not evoo

no-

use butter.[/quote]

? ? ?

[quote]paul496 wrote:
Sound out! :slight_smile:

Still tho, even with the oils you mentioned, is all the oil being absorbed or is some evaporating and therefore reducing the calorie conent[/quote]

the cals are reduced because the cooking is b"buring off" the cals but its such a trivial amount that it really does not mater IMO.
so count the oil you use as fat and cal intake but do not count the nutritional aspect of the evoo.

I personly use a nonstick pan and use a small amount of water to cook then drink my evoo by the spoonfulls before I eat.

[quote]nichaaron wrote:
paul496 wrote:
Sound out! :slight_smile:

Still tho, even with the oils you mentioned, is all the oil being absorbed or is some evaporating and therefore reducing the calorie conent

the cals are reduced because the cooking is b"buring off" the cals but its such a trivial amount that it really does not mater IMO.
so count the oil you use as fat and cal intake but do not count the nutritional aspect of the evoo.

I personly use a nonstick pan and use a small amount of water to cook then drink my evoo by the spoonfulls before I eat.
[/quote]

Cheers.

I might just stop stir frying and just george foreman that shit… Lob the evoo on it after its cooked.

This was good, i learn something. Sound. :slight_smile:

[quote]paul496 wrote:
orion wrote:
paul496 wrote:
Right, can i use just normal olive oil, but not evoo

no-

use butter.

? ? ?
[/quote]

Butter, peanut oil, and coconut oil are about the three most heat stable substances you can use to cook with. You pretty much need to cook with a blast furnace to oxidize butter and peanut oil.

[quote]paul496 wrote:
I might just stop stir frying and just george foreman that shit… Lob the evoo on it after its cooked.

This was good, i learn something. Sound. :slight_smile:

[/quote]

Better to fry it, preferably with Coconut oil or butter, but even Olive oil would be preferable over the George Foreman grill. Over time, you absorb the metal from the damn thing. I mean, once in a while I guess wouldn’t be too bad, but don’t do it regularly.

[quote]entheogens wrote:
Better to fry it, preferably with Coconut oil or butter, but even Olive oil would be preferable over the George Foreman grill. Over time, you absorb the metal from the damn thing. I mean, once in a while I guess wouldn’t be too bad, but don’t do it regularly.

[/quote]

Thats extremely cool of you to point out bro.

fyi its actually 160cal for the amt you’re using.
1 tbsp is 120 calories + 1 tsp which is 40 = 160.
Not a huge difference, but if you’re worried about how many calories to count for the oil you use to cook with, then I guess it matters.

[quote]entheogens wrote:
Better to fry it, preferably with Coconut oil or butter, but even Olive oil would be preferable over the George Foreman grill. Over time, you absorb the metal from the damn thing. I mean, once in a while I guess wouldn’t be too bad, but don’t do it regularly.
[/quote]

Line up the grill with Al foil to avoid absorbing the carcinogens.

the higher your temp the less oil you absorb.

if you’re stir frying this means the wok is so damn hot you have to keep the product, in this case turkey, moving at all times or it will burn. stir frying 200 g of turkey should take about 15-30 seconds.

if you don’t have enough heat your turkey will

  1. not be seared

  2. be absorbing oil because of said lack of sear

  3. be absorbing even more oil as it sits for 2-10 minutes in oil that isn’t hot enough to cook it fast. this is also why the chinamen cut their meat flat and relatively thin like they do: more surface area and thinner product cook fast through hi-ya.

to get proper heat you need an oil that doesn’t burn at low temps. olive oil will turn to black smoke the instant it hits a hot pan. you need a wicked lotta b.t.u.'s. and some carbon steel or cast iron.

Grape Seed Oil hasn’t been mentioned yet, but it is another oil that has an incredibly high heat tolerance. It doesn’t degrade, even when frying at high temperatures. Plus, its really flavorful

[quote]analog_kid wrote:
Butter, peanut oil, and coconut oil are about the three most heat stable substances you can use to cook with. You pretty much need to cook with a blast furnace to oxidize butter and peanut oil. [/quote]

Exactly. I use coconut oil, and sometimes butter. Yes both are primarily saturated fat which is why they are stable.

Saturated fat does not cause heart disease:

"We don�??t know the ideal diet composition. We do know that saturated fat, unlike trans-fat, is a normal part of body chemistry and extreme avoidance is not justified by current scientific data. Removing some saturated fat to reduce calories is good, but adding back carbs appears to be deleterious. It appears that healthy, carbohydrate restriction will trump the effects of any kind of fat. "

http://www.dlife.com/dLife/do/ShowContent/food_and_nutrition/what_if_saturated_fat_not_problem.html